walleyejoe

rod strength

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I guess this is an odd question, but hopefully someone here has an answer.  Rod and blank manufacturers put line weight recommendations on their rods, would the breaking point of the rod be in that range, or would you expect it to be somewhere else?  For example, a rod rated for 15 to 30 lb line, that rod should be expected to lift 17 lbs of dead weight off the floor without breaking, or fight a big fish using a reel set for 17 lbs of drag, but somewhere over 18 lbs you would expect it to let go.  

 

Or more likely, there's just no way to tell, the weight recommendations are just related to fishing performance.  Rods recommended for the same line could have, and do have, vastly different blank diameters and wall thicknesses, and their breaking points are more related to blank design and weight.

 

Tim 

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The line weight has nothing to do with physical weight.

For example, drag on 30 lb test line should be set to 1/3 the breaking strength Or 10 lbs. Therefore you would not be able to pick up 17 lbs of weight off the floor because the drag will slip.

This will protect your set up from failure. Rod, line, hooks ect.

You could still use heavier line or drag outside the recommendation as long as you don’t set the drag to tight. Example 50 lbs drag on a rod rated to 30 lb test.

Most quality rods will be able to handle much more than the line rating.

Check out “trying to break a GSB” on Lamiglas’ website.

 

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Remember fish don't weigh nothing in the water, they are suspending in it right? Your just fighting their strength, we catch 8 - 10 ft. long white sturgeon in the heavy current of the Columbia River on 15 lbs of drag on 80 lb braid with 3 lbs of lead sometimes.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Lamiglas also has a video where a 10 - 12 lb. line weight Si steelhead rod took 61.8 lb. of  load to break. It's all in the materials and how you use them. Check out the blank failure article from RodMaker magazine that is linked to the North Fork Composite's site. Some pretty extraordinary things had to be done to get the blanks to fail, even the high modulus ones. I was told by a rod designer many years ago, that after going through all their warranty materials their unexplained blank failure rate was .005%.

Edited by spoonplugger1

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