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Eff Eversource.

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And eff this effin state.

 

From the Hartford Courant.

 

Eversource says power restoration will take through next Tuesday, promises substantial progress by end of weekend while officials blast power company for ’epic failure’ after Tropical Storm Isaias


By DAVID OWENS and DAVE ALTIMARI
HARTFORD COURANT |
AUG 07, 2020 AT 6:35 AM

 

Eversource announced late Thursday night that it will take until midnight Tuesday to restore nearly all of the hundreds of thousands of power outages caused by Tropical Storm Isaias amid growing anger over the utility’s response to the storm.

The utility promised earlier in the day to have a “very large” number of customers restored by the end of the weekend but will have to work on smaller outages into the middle of next week.

 

Meanwhile, the Public Utilities Regulatory Authority said it would launch an investigation into how Eversource and United Illuminating handled Tropical Storm Isaias. With about 40% of Eversource customers still without power, hundreds of roads remain blocked by down trees and power lines across Connecticut.

 

On Thursday evening, about 545,000 customers remained out of power statewide — 472,000 Eversource customers and 73,000 customers served by United Illuminating, which serves coastal areas of the state. United Illuminating said Thursday it would restore power to most customers by late Saturday.

 

By 6:15 a.m. Friday, the number of outages across the state dropped to almost 470,000, with 411,782 Eversource customers lacking power -- about a third of them -- and 58,054 United Illuminating customers.

 

A total of about 1 million Eversource and United Illuminating customers lost power at the peak of the outages after the storm.

 

PURA chairman Marissa P. Gillett joined Gov. Ned Lamont and a growing chorus of local municipal leaders who say Eversource was unprepared for the storm that hit Connecticut on Tuesday.

 

“There has been a significant failure in communication here, leaving upward of 800,000 Eversource customers without even a clear way to report an outage from the outset of the storm event,” Gillet said in a statement released by PURA. “There are disturbing reports emerging about the coordination, or lack thereof, between our electric utilities and the communities which they serve. This is simply unacceptable.”

 

Eversource said Thursday there are 516 broken poles, 3,111 downed spans of electrical wire, 174 damaged transformers, 2,225 trees to be removed and 716 blocked roads.

 

Eversource President of Electrical Operations Craig Hallstrom said Thursday afternoon there would be 1,200 crews working to restore power by Friday.

 

“We know how urgently our customers need power and we will work tirelessly — with every crew and resource we can muster — until they all have power again,” Hallstrom said in a statement late Thursday. “With crews from Canada, Michigan and Massachusetts working alongside our Eversource crews, we remain laser focused on this restoration and are committed to staying on the job around-the-clock until every customer has power back. We are grateful to our customers for their patience and recognize the tremendous inconvenience that being without electricity presents during the ongoing pandemic and hot days of summer.”

 

Despite the criticism of Eversource, he said the company had “sufficient” crews working before the storm.

 

“Whether we’re going as fast as each community would like, that’s something we work hard at, but we cannot satisfy everybody’s needs all at once,” Hallstrom said.

 

Gov. Ned Lamont, who requested the PURA investigation, said Eversource’s effort thus far is “not that impressive.”

 

“I can’t have a senior who’s living alone with no electricity and no air conditioning waiting day upon day for support,” he said. “We’re going to have plenty of time to Monday morning quarterback this, but right now our priority is getting your power back as soon as we can … I’ve been told not to make any promises on behalf of others except for the fact that we’re going to be focused like a laser beam until each and every one of you gets your service back.”

 

Lamont said the state Department of Labor, already struggling with massive unemployment claims because of the pandemic, is running on a generator that could fail at any time. Several state police barracks and public safety centers are also still running on generators, he said.

 

‘We’re angry’


Since the storm struck Tuesday, line crews with Eversource and United Illuminating have made some progress restoring power to customers, but frustration continues to mount for state and local officials who say Eversource’s response has been slow and inadequate.

 

Eversource told municipal leaders on a call Thursday afternoon that they would almost double their number of crews on Friday and already have restored some 193 “critical facilities,” such as sewer treatment plants and town halls. They still have another 600 critical facilities to go, however, and town leaders lamented their response so far.

 

United Illuminating has not escaped criticism either and on Thursday afternoon the city of Bridgeport became the first municipality to the utility to court.

 

Bridgeport officials filed a motion in Superior Court asking a judge to compel the utility to hire more crews on its own dime, provide accurate restoration estimates to the city’s emergency operations center and expedite certain restorations involving public health, such as senior centers, according to the filing.

 

In Vernon, leaders from numerous eastern Connecticut towns lined up Thursday afternoon to blast the company’s handling thus far of the storm and the damage.

 

“We’re angry,” said Vernon Mayor Dan Champagne, who is also a Republican state senator for the 35th District. “All of our communities were prepared for the storm. They called for winds up to 80 miles an hour. Eversource should have been ready for this and they were not. We were. And all of our towns ... were ready.”

 

Cleanup efforts in Vernon have been hampered by having only one Eversource crew available to clear downed power lines, Champagne said.

 

“This is an epic failure,” Champagne said, adding many residents of Vernon and nearby communities rely on water from wells that require electric pumps.

 

In the aftermath of the October snowstorm in 2011, that devastated the state and knocked out power for a week for many customers, town and cities worked with the power company — then known as Northeast Utilities — to come up with protocols about communications and other matters, Manchester General Manager Scott Shanley said. And the system worked during storms since then, he said.

 

“In this storm it completely fell apart‚” Shanley said. “There’s just no communication and that’s the toughest part.”

 

Firefighters in Tolland had to wait more than an hour to respond to a call for live electrical wires that had fallen onto a car, Tolland Town Manager Michael J. Rosen said.

 

And in Coventry, Town Manager John Elsesser said a sewage pumping station in his town is running on a generator. If it fails, sewage will be dumped into Coventry Lake.

 

In other communities, public works and tree crews were standing by Wednesday night for an Eversource line crew to arrive, but none showed up,

 

In West Hartford, where more than half of the town is out of power, there was only one Eversource crew working Wednesday night, town officials said.

 

“The No. 1 thing we need is resources from Eversource — as many crews as we can get,” West Hartford Town Manager Matt Hart told Lamont at a briefing Thursday.

 

Asked at a press briefing if Eversource was should have erred on the side of caution in preparing to respond the storm, Hallstrom said the company did.

 

“We’re conservative in what we do and how we plan,” Hallstrom said. “We know we put our plan into place, we do the best we can to determine how many resources we need. You can’t hire thousands and thousands of crews based on ‘we just want to be prepared.’ Economically, financially, that just doesn’t make sense. We make the best prediction we can, and then we adjust accordingly.”

 

In documents filed with the state Public Utilities Regulatory Authority, Eversource said it had planned for a storm with as many as 375,000 outages. At its peak roughly 1 million customers in Connecticut were without power. PURA’s Gillett and Lamont say Eversource vastly underestimated the storm.

 

On Thursday, major thoroughfares in many communities remained blocked by fallen trees with electrical wires entangled in them. Until the wires are cleared, the trees cannot be safely removed, local officials say. Live wires also continue to crackle more than 24 hours after the storm moved through the state .

 

State Sen. Norman Needleman, D-Essex, chairman of the legislature’s Energy and Technology Committee, said Thursday that his committee will be holding hearings in the next legislative session to dissect the utility companies’ response to the tropical storm.

 

“It’s clear that at least Eversource was blind-sided by this storm,” Needleman said. “This was a failure a long time in the making and we plan to find out why they haven’t mustered together enough crews to deal with this storm.”

 

Historic devastation


Two men have been killed as a result of the storm, in addition to the immense damage to infrastructure and property across the state.

 

Raymond Schultz, a 66-year-old Naugatuck man, died just after 3:30 p.m. Tuesday during the height of the storm when he tried to remove branches from in front of his vehicle on Andrew Mountain Road and was struck by another falling tree, police said.

 

On Thursday, officials announced Stephen Caciopoli, a 33-year-old Newtown man, also died in the immediate aftermath of the storm. He was trying to help a neighbor remove a downed tree with a portable masonry saw when it kicked back and cut his neck, Newtown police said. He was transported to Danbury Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

 

The storm also caused “historic devastation and ranks among the most serious to ever strike Connecticut,” sparing no town in the state, Eversource said.

 

“We’re still pressing on,” said Eversource spokesman Mitch Gross. “We have excellent weather conditions today. That will certainly help the crews in their efforts.” The crews are working with town crews to clear roads, he added.

 

The number of line crews swelled to about 700 by the end of Thursday and another 677 are scheduled to arrive Friday, more than triple the number of crews available on Wednesday, Eversource officials said.

 

Crews have been called in from Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Michigan and Canada to aid in restoration efforts, Eversource officials said.

 

“There are hundreds of utility poles that need to be replaced as well as extensive length of overhead electric line that will need to be rehung,” Gross said.

 

“Trucks and people are everywhere,” he continued. “It’s a non-stop 24/7 operation for as long as is needed.”

 

Also Thursday, Lamont activated the Connecticut Army and Air National Guard to help clear roads. Four teams will be assigned to clearing downed trees and other debris.

 

Trouble clearing roads


Some town officials across Connecticut say they have still not received word from Eversource on when they will begin to see restoration efforts.

 

Eversource serves 149 of Connecticut’s 169 towns, and the outages represent roughly 40% of its customers. United Illuminating outages totaled about 23% of its customers on Thursday.

 

In Avon outages declined from about 98% of the community to 70% as of Thursday morning, according to Eversource.

 

Jim Rio, the town’s director of police services, said Eversource crews are working in town and helping public works crews clear blocked roadways.

 

“Our big holdup is Eversource,” Rio said. “We can’t clear certain closures or precarious situations if it involves wires unless they’re present.”

 

Avon Town Manager Brandon Roberts said power was restored to busy Route 44, although many other roads remain blocked.

 

In neighboring Farmington, a combination of downed trees and lack of electrical service caused gridlock across the town on Wednesday. Route 4 was down to one lane near Brickyard Road because of downed trees. And westbound traffic was backed up nearly to I-84, police chief Paul Melanson said.

 

Melanson described the damage to trees and the electrical infrastructure in town as “massive.” About 70% of the town was out of power Thursday evening.

 

“We’ve been greatly impacted by this,” he said. “The majority of our residents are without power and there’s significant and extraordinary damage to the electrical system with large trees that are blocking roadways with power lines across them.”

 

Hours of pleading got an Eversource lineman and tree crew into Farmington Wednesday night and together with Farmington public works crews and police they were able to clear most blocked roads, Melanson said.

 

“They worked so hard and it was phenomenal,” Melanson said. “We’re really appreciative of that.”

 

 

 

 

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Regulator says Eversource misclassified Tropical Storm Isaias and was unprepared for huge number of outages; Gov. Ned Lamont requests investigation and utilities say power restoration will take days


By NICHOLAS RONDINONE, ALEX PUTTERMAN and ZACH MURDOCK


HARTFORD COURANT |


AUG 06, 2020 AT 8:56 AM

 

A top Connecticut utility regulator said Wednesday that Eversource misclassified Tropical Storm Isaias as it bore down on the Northeast, estimating it would cause half as many outages as it ultimately did, leaving the utility unready to respond to the scope of the devastation left in the storm’s wake.

 

Gov. Ned Lamont is now calling for an investigation into Eversource and United Illuminating’s handling of the storm so far, including their leaders’ preparation ahead of its arrival, while pressuring the utilities to immediately scale up the number of repair crews working across the state.

 

More than 720,000 customers were left without power immediately after the storm and, despite some initial repairs Wednesday, utility companies are telling state officials it could be between five and 10 days before power is fully restored given the severity of damage to wires, sources said.

 

The number of those without power has since dropped by about 100,000: By 8:50 a.m., Thursday, the number of customers in the dark was closer to 620,000; 540,417 of them were Eversource customers and 80,069 were in United Illuminating’s territory to the south.

 

“We’ve got to get this state up and operating again with a working electric system and I want that done overwhelmingly by the end of the week,” Lamont demanded outside Eversource headquarters in Berlin. “I’m going to try to hold people accountable as best I can.”

 

Lamont announced the request for an investigation by the Public Utilities Regulatory Authority after meeting with Eversource CEO James Judge while the company still grappled with more than 600,000 outages late Wednesday afternoon. The governor said he left the meeting wanting to hear more urgency from the utility.

 

Several officials who participated in a massive emergency operations call earlier this week said Eversource officials were almost dismissive of the storm and regulators pointed out that United Illuminating was more prepared for the impact in advance based on paperwork filed Monday by each utility ahead of the storm.

 

United Illuminating filed that it was preparing for a so-called Level 3 storm, whereas Eversource filed paperwork that it was preparing for a lesser Level 4 storm event with no more than 375,000 outages, documents show.

 

“It’s clear it was on the high end of a Level 3 event,” PURA Chairwoman Marissa Paslick Gillett said.

 

Eversource President of Regional Electric Operations Craig Hallstrom said the utility did not have a specific estimate of how many outages could occur before the storm. He appeared alongside Lamont at a briefing outside the utility’s headquarters, without Judge, to answer questions about the response from the news media.

 

“We fully understand the magnitude of this event and the urgency we need to take in order to get our power back,” Hallstrom said.

 

Eversource officials defended their pre-storm classification late Wednesday night, which was based on guidance from external experts on the storm’s track late last week, Eversource spokesman Mitch Gross. The utility reclassified the storm as its track changed the models dictated, Gross said.

 

Lamont, who declared a state of emergency as he toured storm damage in central Connecticut, was unsatisfied with the response so far, however, and prodded both utilities to make faster work of the cleanup and repairs. His disaster declaration allows the state to take advantage of resources and assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Administration and the Connecticut National Guard.

 

With the destruction from downed trees and power lines in every community in Connecticut, Eversource was reporting more than 586,000 outages Wednesday night, while United Illuminating, which serves residents in southern Connecticut, was reporting more than 85,000.

 

Utility officials said Isaias ranks as the third-most damaging storm in recent memory. The total outages from Tuesday’s storm were higher than Superstorm Sandy in 2012 and just below Hurricane Irene in August 2011 and the subsequent October snowstorm.

 

Officials with Eversource said crews are still working to assess the extent of the damage to the electrical infrastructure, but it will take at least several days to restore power to all customers.

“We’re asking our customers to prepare for multiple days without power,” Eversource spokesman Mitch Gross said. Damage is “extensive, especially as you move further west.”

 

The company will work with towns to get essential services restored first, such as hospitals, fire stations and water treatment plants, Gross said. And the company will work to make repairs that will get service restored to the most people.

 

“We go to work with the goal of restoring the largest number of customers we can at a single time,” he said.

 

Eversource officials said the utility had 450 line crews working as of Wednesday, but that number will grow. State Sen. Bob Duff, D-Norwalk, reported that the company had told him it was bringing in 1,000 crews from Canada to assist.

 

United Illuminating was also warning residents that it could take several days to restore power.

 

“We saw damage across our electric system, in all of the 17 towns and cities we serve, with more than 1,600 outage-causing events and more than 1,000 wires down that for safety reasons crews must address,” said Tony Marone, UI’s president and CEO. “We planned for this storm and marshalled significant restoration resources ahead of its arrival. We appreciate everyone’s patience as our crews work diligently, putting safety first, to get power restored to every customer.”

 

Along with power outages, residents across the state were reporting cable and internet issues. In West Hartford, where about half the town still had power, many residents, working from home during the pandemic, were reporting that their internet connection was down, officials said.

 

“At this time, it appears most issues are commercial power-related, and services should be restored for our customers as power comes back on,” said Kristen L. Roberts, a Comcast spokesperson. “In some cases, there is damage related to high winds and fallen trees, and our technicians are working to restore services as quickly as it’s safe to do so.”

 

Local leaders criticize Eversource response


Elected officials and local leaders Wednesday were already finger-pointing at Eversource, the state’s dominant electric utility, saying they were unprepared for the storm. The criticism comes on top of customers’ and legislators’ outrage over recently approved rate hikes that have since been suspended while regulators investigate.

 

Sen. Norm Needleman, an Essex Democrat and chairman of the legislature’s energy committee, also called for an investigation into Eversource’s response to the storm.

Local leaders said communication with Eversource was lacking and that public works crews were standing by waiting to clear roads but could not do so until utility crews arrived to de-energize downed wires.

 

One central Connecticut municipal leader said Eversource didn’t even dispatch assessment teams until Wednesday morning.

 

The Eversource liaison with that community provided only spotty information all Tuesday night and was working from home without power or internet access, the official said.

 

The utility was not following its usual practice of coordinating with local public works departments about which transmission lines to repair and when, the official said.

 

A furious Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim said Wednesday that United Illuminated told him not to even call back when he complained about the lack of restoration to critical locations in his city, including senior living centers. He and other city leaders lambasted the utility at a briefing, calling the UI response criminally negligent and discriminatory.

 

Ganim said he has ordered the city attorney to coordinate with the state's attorney's office to consider whether the utility's lack of response might constitute racial discrimination, given the city's majority-minority resident demographics.

 

“It’s my obligation to fight for you and for them to say don’t call this line back ... that is unacceptable,” Ganim said. “It shows a reckless disregard for life.”

 

Streets like a battle zone


No towns or cities were spared damage as the powerful tropical storm sped through Connecticut, ripping down trees and shredding electrical wires in a few short hours Tuesday afternoon and evening. Almost 40 towns were reporting that more than 90% of homes and businesses were without power more than 24 hours later.

 

At least one person was killed during the storm by a falling tree. Raymond Schultz, a 66-year-old Naugatuck man, died just after 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, during the height of the storm, when he tried to remove branches from in front of his vehicle on Andrew Mountain Road and was struck by another falling tree, police said.

 

Five people were injured in Lisbon when trees landed on a city bus and on the road at the height of the storm, a fire official said.

 

The bus was headed from the Lisbon Landing shopping center to Norwich about 3:30 p.m. when it stopped short for a tree in the road, said John Cingranelli, deputy chief. At the same time, a large tree fell on the bus.

 

Of the 14 people on the bus, five suffered injuries from the bus’ sudden braking, Cingranelli said. They were taken to Backus Hospital in Norwich to be treated for minor injuries.

Jim Marpe, the first selectman of Westport, said Wednesday he believes the damage in his town of roughly 28,000 is among the worst in the state.

 

He saw a video of what looked like a waterspout at Compos Beach, a town beach, and fallen trees at the municipal golf course looked as though they could have been thrown to the ground by some sort of twister.

 

Westport Fire Chief Robert Yost, who also is the town’s emergency management director, said wind gusts were as strong as 63 mph in the Fairfield County town, and 97% of Eversource customers lost power, putting it on par with Superstorm Sandy in its effect on the town, minus the flooding.

 

Roads in Burlington looked like a battle zone Tuesday evening, and were only marginally better by Wednesday morning.

 

Just a couple of minutes away, Canton’s business district and the Colinsville village center were doing business as usual. Several shops and cafes even had lawn signs and outdoor restaurant seating in place.

 

But a few miles farther east on Route 44, the busy commercial corridor in Simsbury and Avon was dark, although the Big Y supermarket had generators and was open, Avon Town Manager Brandon Robertson said. Eastbound traffic backed up from Route 167 — where the traffic light was out — all the way to the closed La Trattoria restaurant.

 

Avon was hard-hit by the storm and 98.5% of the town remained without power Wednesday evening and about nine roads remain blocked by fallen trees while Avon public works teams waited for Eversource crews to deal with downed wires before tackling the tree work, Robertson and Jim Rio, the town’s director of police service said.

 

“Avon really got hammered,” Robertson said. Six houses had trees on them and a pickup truck was damaged by a falling tree, but no injuries were reported, Robertson said.

 

Farmington police Chief Paul Melanson described the damage to trees and the electrical infrastructure in town as “massive” and more than 78% of the town was out of power Wednesday afternoon.

 

“We’ve been greatly impacted by this,” he said. “The majority of our residents are without power and there’s significant and extraordinary damage to the electrical system with large trees that are blocking roadways with power lines across them.”

 

Outage numbers in each of those numbers barely changed throughout Wednesday, according to the utility’s public outage dashboard.

 

State parks were closed Wednesday and more than half will remain closed Thursday for cleanup.

 

 

 

 

 

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Blah blah blah. We’ve heard all this before. Politicians want an investigation. Utility companies making. 

 
Both sides just paying lip service and in another month this will be all forgotten. 

 

Then the next storm hits and we replay it all over again. 
We all know nothing will come of this.

 

I don’t know why either side even bothers to talk about it. 
Wait and see how fast the rates go up! That will be done in the blink of an eye.

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12 mins ago, The TideRunner said:

Blah blah blah. We’ve heard all this before. Politicians want an investigation. Utility companies making. 

 
Both sides just paying lip service and in another month this will be all forgotten. 

 

Then the next storm hits and we replay it all over again. 
We all know nothing will come of this.

 

I don’t know why either side even bothers to talk about it. 
Wait and see how fast the rates go up! That will be done in the blink of an eye.

Couldn’t have said it better myself! Every time a storm hits it the same dam thing. Oops we underestimate it. Wish I had a job were every time I effed up thousands of people were affected by it and I could just shrug my shoulders and said my bad.

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A lot of this damage could have been avoided by preventive maintenance by property owners as well as the towns. Most of those trees that fell across roads and power lines were in poor condition to start with, but no one wanted to spend the money to take the trees down onshore them up. So all these trees get blown over and we expect the electric company to be responsible? I'd wager that every tree that took out a power line was owned by the towns or private property owners.

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On ‎8‎/‎8‎/‎2020 at 2:23 PM, MakoMike said:

A lot of this damage could have been avoided by preventive maintenance by property owners as well as the towns. Most of those trees that fell across roads and power lines were in poor condition to start with, but no one wanted to spend the money to take the trees down onshore them up. So all these trees get blown over and we expect the electric company to be responsible? I'd wager that every tree that took out a power line was owned by the towns or private property owners.

Should towns/state mandate that all trees be cut back to 100ft from street power lines?

 

That's what it would take to be effective.

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5 mins ago, Gotcow? said:

Should towns/state mandate that all trees be cut back to 100ft from street power lines?

 

That's what it would take to be effective.

That would be one way to address the issue, but in CT with its dense woods, it would be very difficult to get cooperation. A better way might be for someone to determine if the tree owner is liable for the cost of repair if they negligently fail to inspect and remove defective trees. I see lots of obviously dead trees sitting right next to the road when I drive the back roads. Notice that a tree falling onto an interstate is pretty rare, even though there are lost of trees around, that's because the state highway Dept. inspects the trees and removed potential problems before they start.

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3 hours ago, MakoMike said:

That would be one way to address the issue, but in CT with its dense woods, it would be very difficult to get cooperation. A better way might be for someone to determine if the tree owner is liable for the cost of repair if they negligently fail to inspect and remove defective trees. I see lots of obviously dead trees sitting right next to the road when I drive the back roads. Notice that a tree falling onto an interstate is pretty rare, even though there are lost of trees around, that's because the state highway Dept. inspects the trees and removed potential problems before they start.

It's a regular occurrence on the Wilbur Cross hwy............

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16 hours ago, Gotcow? said:

It's a regular occurrence on the Wilbur Cross hwy............

Just to state the obvious, the Wilber Cross is NOT an interstate highway.

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I’ve taken to calling them Neversource. A new nickname. My power went out last Tues around 5 pm, just came back on Mon at 9:30 am. In fairness to NS, there were a lotta trees down. And most of the ones I saw were not dead trees, they had full canopies, which is probably why they were blown over, they were like sailboats catching the wind. But it begs the question of what policy should be regarding the removal of trees close to the lines. Because the next storm may not be a tropical storm but a cat 2-3 hurricane. The state authority looking into this should not just cast blame on NS, but should also work to develop a policy regarding promoting the burying of power lines (infrastructure upgrades), cutting back trees to a reasonable distance (distance tbd) from overhead power lines, improving communications to customers, prioritizing which areas get fixed first, etc. I also think municipalities should be thinking about what they can do to alleviate future problems. Our town’s work crews had most of the roads cleared pretty quickly, but they didn’t touch anything with live wires. Engage NS to provide training to town people to  identify impacted areas so NS can shut the power down, let the town’s clear the trees, then NS can come in and repair the lines if needed.  

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I'm all over the state and there are too many power lines running through or near trees. 

It's gonna happen, but the repair time in some areas has been unconscionable :howdy:

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