fishhappy

Composite interior door

Rate this topic

18 posts in this topic

We are getting rid of some old hollow core interior doors (about 1968) and thinking about replacing them with composites. So far, the Masonite is winning the conversation. Jeldwin is being considered to.
What are your thoughts and preferences on composite interior doors and composite door manufacturers?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think with composite moisture could be an issue, not sure how your local weather and such are. Did you consider good old raised panel wood doors. They will be quieter than hollow doors, and close more solidly. If kids are around those hollow ones can’t take too much abuse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 mins ago, giant basshole said:

I think with composite moisture could be an issue, not sure how your local weather and such are. Did you consider good old raised panel wood doors. They will be quieter than hollow doors, and close more solidly. If kids are around those hollow ones can’t take too much abuse.

Yes, we are also looking at some pine doors, my wife wants them painted white. I figured the Mdf would be easier to paint. I’m leaning toward solid pine, but there are some designs in natural wood that get pricey.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With the composite doors, take a little time. Purchase what ever paint, you are going to use. With a two inch brush, paint the top and bottom of the door.

Or take the door after it is installed, so you know the door is cut to size.

Lay it down  on a padded surface, and give it  two coats top and bottom.

They do sell solid doors, which are heavier, better at blocking sound.

They hold together, they are more money, and labor! Nothing  wrong with

Jeldwen and Masonite, they are good products.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, surfcast said:

With the composite doors, take a little time. Purchase what ever paint, you are going to use. With a two inch brush, paint the top and bottom of the door.

Or take the door after it is installed, so you know the door is cut to size.

Lay it down  on a padded surface, and give it  two coats top and bottom.

They do sell solid doors, which are heavier, better at blocking sound.

They hold together, they are more money, and labor! Nothing  wrong with

Jeldwen and Masonite, they are good products.

I wasn't looking for more labor.  Maybe I should stick with wood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fishhappy

 

"Composite" doors are usually fine if properly made and prime painted well (as surfcast said - an absolute must to paint top and bottom edges). Jeld-Wen makes good doors. Most composite doors are made of mdf, harder than pine and easier to paint usually. I'm pretty old school but solid wood doors and frames are not always as dimensionally stable as mdf, plywood. Yes - mdf will blow up easier if exposed to water. 

If you are looking to minimize labor - get the doors pre-primed from wherever you buy them.

 

Good luck

 

"recovering architect" Peter

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, for me nothing but solid wood works.

And I can tell you those are MF to break into, when keys get lost. But that is the least and last of the reasons for choosing only solid wood.

Interior also, all wood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure, but they have a way to go around that.

Something like these, not sure which ones are mine. All I know is that they are solidly heavy, and wooden.

Btw, to the OP, watch what kind of paint youre putting on, because if done with wrong kind, one of the problems is that they start making cracking noises, due to sticking when closed.

SOLID-TIMBERv2.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, fishhappy said:

I wasn't looking for more labor.  Maybe I should stick with wood.

When mentioned more labor, I meant they are a lot more heavy.

I would suggest contacting Jeldwen, see what type of paint to use.

I have used allot hollow doors, they are ok really nothing wrong with them.

The solid doors lessen sound a little better. And in your bathroom there is no

Mounting any hardware, to hold your robe. You could order your bathroom

door solid, and bedrooms. And all closets and nonessential doors, could be hollow core. You would save some money, for sure. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting conversation on this forum. I was a finish carpenter going on 50 years. Hung and seen thousands of doors. Those pine raised panel doors are old school not used much at all now. The center panels sweel  and contract with humidity which causes your paint to crack. MDF is not particle board. Does not get affected by moisture. Lower quality doors (hollow) are Masonite and may have partical board fillers. I worked on very high end houses and the best doors were poplar styles and rails and mdf panels. Iwould recomend a 1 3/8 solid panel door. By the way you can hang something on these doors. The style is the horizontal piece between the panels. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 mins ago, Prospector said:

Interesting conversation on this forum. I was a finish carpenter going on 50 years. Hung and seen thousands of doors. Those pine raised panel doors are old school not used much at all now. The center panels sweel  and contract with humidity which causes your paint to crack. MDF is not particle board. Does not get affected by moisture. Lower quality doors (hollow) are Masonite and may have partical board fillers. I worked on very high end houses and the best doors were poplar styles and rails and mdf panels. Iwould recomend a 1 3/8 solid panel door. By the way you can hang something on these doors. The style is the horizontal piece between the panels. 

What manufactures of the MDF do you recommend?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually all the brands are about equal. Try to buy a solid core 1 3/8. They are above and beyond the Best Buy. Don't forget while shopping for doors that no matter what you pick it will still be the same amount of labor! Then the fact the solids will last for years to come. Hollow are mounded of Masonite which doesn't absorb moisture but the structure inside in the hollow is cardboard in an accordion fashion on edge glued in for support. Hope this helps 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.