Frede

Self-Rescue Experience and Questions

53 posts in this topic

Practiced self-rescues with my Hobie Compass.  I flipped it a few times after hrs fishing/fighting currents....wanted to be tired.  I'm unhappy with how I had to right the yak.  I found climbing up the sides of a capsized Compass impossible - hands slipped right off.  I finally grabbed the mirage drive and climbed on from the bow.  Once on top I grabbed the molded handle to perform the "lean back" move.....nope, my arm was so far under the yak I had zero ability to lean back.  I tried grabbing the sides but my hands slipped off.  Would up grabbing the seat which started pulling off as I leaned back but it worked and the yak righted.  Though fairly tired I then practiced re-boarding the Compass from all sides multiple times in a row with no problem. 

 

I want to be able to climb on top the my capsized/righted yak from all sides.  There's ladders but I'll get tangled in the damn thing so looking for alternatives.  So I'm ordering "Hobie Compass Side Handle Kit" below to solve the issue.  I'm thinking carry a piece of cordage in my PDF to attached to the handle.  If capsized I could then loop cordage through the handle, throw it over the yak, make my way around and use the cord to pull myself up.  The yak may even right itself before I got all the way on it.  Thoughts or suggestions? 

 

                   

handle.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good on you for even doing that!  That said, I looked at some images of the Compass and I'm flummoxed that there's no actual handles, just that indent inside the gunwale. How do you carry it? All 4 of my SOT boats have gunwale handles. I don't know how I'd get them on top of the car without them.  They're pretty useful too, I attach my drift sock and paddle leash to them. If I were over I suppose either could serve as an aid to righting the boat like the piece of line you propose. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s great you practiced and have a plan, most don’t go that far. The side handles should work well for rescue, and also for  lifting and moving the yak. Some guys pull the kayak upright with that rope toss, swim around method. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 mins ago, gellfex said:

Good on you for even doing that!  That said, I looked at some images of the Compass and I'm flummoxed that there's no actual handles, just that indent inside the gunwale. How do you carry it? All 4 of my SOT boats have gunwale handles. I don't know how I'd get them on top of the car without them.  They're pretty useful too, I attach my drift sock and paddle leash to them. If I were over I suppose either could serve as an aid to righting the boat like the piece of line you propose. 

Yeah they are molded handles (indents) and not ideal to say the least....carrying it is not easy.  The accessory handles should be in my possession next week so I'll test the line solution to righting the yak. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good move on adding straps.  If you have a crate in the back consider coming in from the bow during practice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fred, as far as righting your kayak, once you install handles,  try reaching under the kayak & grabbing the far side handle & pulling it under instead of over to right it.

 

I don't have a Hobie but that's is the way i do it even with a loaded kayak, super fast & easy to do, takes zero energy..... I tried marking up an internet pic to show how it flips. 

 

kayak.jpg.ff314625a60029f88902bd78c95d615b.jpg

 

 

We had this conversation a few yrs back, mentioned this, some said they'd try it but never heard back from anyone. Some speculated a Hobie is too heavy to do it this way but i don't think anyone even tried it...give it a shot & report back. 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depending on the yak, and how loaded it is you may also be able to pop it back upright. Pull down hard on the gunnel, then as it pops back up you thrust up your palms from below while unleashing your best frog kick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 mins ago, cheech said:

It’s great you practiced and have a plan, most don’t go that far. The side handles should work well for rescue, and also for  lifting and moving the yak. Some guys pull the kayak upright with that rope toss, swim around method. 

Guys on here suggested self rescue practice from all sides....I'm listening lol 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Solid handles will be far more useful than those flexible ones you’ve shown .... don’t know where to source them but I think it was KingHong who got hold of a suitable set.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good on you for practicing self rescue. Its always a good idea to have some type of cord you can use as leverage incase you need it to right the kayak. Anyone who has sailed and fliped hobie cats knows how easy it is to right them with the proper leverage. 

Getting back into your kayak can be even a bigger challenge especially if you have tons of accessories attached to the sides. On my Viking its so low to the water that coming in over the side is very easy however on my PA14 I have to come in over the back. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, The Riddler said:

Good move on adding straps.  If you have a crate in the back consider coming in from the bow during practice.

I was able to board with the crate on but required additional energy.  In an emergency where had had no choice but to board from the stren I'd chuck the crate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Africaster said:

Solid handles will be far more useful than those flexible ones you’ve shown

Yeah, but they can get in the way and stick out much more. I have the ones like he showed on several boats and they're OK. Eddyline was pretty clever with the built in tubular ones on their boats. 

 

5f20d8e231b3a_C14handles.png.d9677bae7ed51290090fc5b9473ebcea.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, BillZ said:

Fred, as far as righting your kayak, once you install handles,  try reaching under the kayak & grabbing the far side handle & pulling it under instead of over to right it.

 

I don't have a Hobie but that's is the way i do it even with a loaded kayak, super fast & easy to do, takes zero energy..... I tried marking up an internet pic to show how it flips. 

 

kayak.jpg.ff314625a60029f88902bd78c95d615b.jpg

 

 

We had this conversation a few yrs back, mentioned this, some said they'd try it but never heard back from anyone. Some speculated a Hobie is too heavy to do it this way but i don't think anyone even tried it...give it a shot & report back. 

 

 

 

 

 

5 hours ago, cheech said:

Depending on the yak, and how loaded it is you may also be able to pop it back upright. Pull down hard on the gunnel, then as it pops back up you thrust up your palms from below while unleashing your best frog kick.

Interesting techniques I never thought of but will attempt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Africaster said:

Solid handles will be far more useful than those flexible ones you’ve shown .... don’t know where to source them but I think it was KingHong who got hold of a suitable set.

We'll see how they work out.....at worst they'll serve as place to loop cordage for self rescue.    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 mins ago, gellfex said:

Yeah, but they can get in the way and stick out much more. I have the ones like he showed on several boats and they're OK. Eddyline was pretty clever with the built in tubular ones on their boats. 

 

5f20d8e231b3a_C14handles.png.d9677bae7ed51290090fc5b9473ebcea.png

That is a great design.  Btw love the weed-wacker leash....made a coupe myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.