iphish

Nfl Games this fall, limiting attendance.

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29 mins ago, paddie said:

I'd be surprised if he makes it to the season. No way he's humble enough to take Bill's ****

If he likes superbowl rings it might. I mean that worked out well for the last quaterback. TB12 has 6 superbowl rings and made 11 Superbowl appearances. That kinda mojo has meat on the bone. Those that play for BB understand there is a payoff to following the plan. Cam Newton just hit the NFL lottery. All he has to do is follow the plan.

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38 mins ago, flydog777 said:

If he likes superbowl rings it might. I mean that worked out well for the last quaterback. TB12 has 6 superbowl rings and made 11 Superbowl appearances. That kinda mojo has meat on the bone. Those that play for BB understand there is a payoff to following the plan. Cam Newton just hit the NFL lottery. All he has to do is follow the plan.

And that I don't foresee happening. Brady is one in a million. 6 super bowls rings and he continued to be coachable. Bellichick would single him out in meetings in front of the team  and we would say yes coach. 

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25 mins ago, paddie said:

And that I don't foresee happening. Brady is one in a million. 6 super bowls rings and he continued to be coachable. Bellichick would single him out in meetings in front of the team  and we would say yes coach. 

It wasn't just Brady, the premiss is the team is #1, not one player or players are any more important than anyone of the team

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19 mins ago, paddie said:

And that I don't foresee happening. Brady is one in a million. 6 super bowls rings and he continued to be coachable. Bellichick would single him out in meetings in front of the team  and we would say yes coach. 

I am not trying to change your opinion. I was just focused on the opportunity Cam has been given. He has proven abilities and achievements. In particular a heisman and nfl mvp. Those are given to people who understand sacrifice and have desire to overcome odds. Although he is coming off a shoulder injury. I was hoping in this point of his career he would be willing to reinvent himself. Allow BB to make him better. Why would he sign knowing who the coach is and what the mission statement is? We will know by game 1 that is for sure.

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Eagles emailed all SBL holders early last week offering a few mouse clicks to opt out of the 2020 season.  Could either have the $ applied to 2021, or get a refund.  They reserved the right to resell your 2020 tickets. 

 

Decent plan on their part, hoping to get x% of the fan base to bail on the season, and make it easier to do limited capacity.  Moot point in the end... there's not going to be any fans in attendance, and likely no season.  

 

We opted out w/o much hesitation.  I love going to games, but I have plenty of other ways to spend my Sundays outside of 12 hour all day trips to S. Philly.  

 

People are still getting their lady-parts chafed over kneeling?  Has anyone even done that since '18?

Edited by fishfood

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Its true TB is one in a million QB but the Patriots will come up with a better another way to cheat the game ...they always do .

How many times have x's has Belicheat been fined for doing the naughty ?   

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1 hour ago, Hook I said:

Its true TB is one in a million QB but the Patriots will come up with a better another way to cheat the game ...they always do .

How many times have x's has Belicheat been fined for doing the naughty ?   

I believe he was only find once in his career regarding a loosely worded rule on filming location. The other fines were team fines

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16 mins ago, iphish said:

I believe he was only find once in his career regarding a loosely worded rule on filming location. The other fines were team fines

If you don’t do anything wrong there are no fines ... to word  it loosely. 

Edited by Hook I

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32 mins ago, Hook I said:

If you don’t do anything wrong there are no fines ... to word  it loosely. 

Every team is penalized for cheating and breaking the rules too.

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18 mins ago, iphish said:

Every team is penalized for cheating and breaking the rules too.

sounds like the inmate doing hard time & complains why he is here & everyone else is doing it . Ha Ha 

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3 hours ago, Hook I said:

If you don’t do anything wrong there are no fines ... to word  it loosely. 

Just like the shirt grabs at the line. The pushes after the whistle. Only the ones called for it count. All the others just didn't happen. Then the penalized comes under scrutiny and is profiled and becomes a repeat offender. No other penalties occurred only the ones the refs called. At least we know the refs are not accused of taking bribes. Just the Patriots are cheating the entire NFL would be headline free from controversy. Well with TB12 gone they could only cheat half as much. So they are working on it!

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16 mins ago, flydog777 said:

Just like the shirt grabs at the line. The pushes after the whistle. Only the ones called for it count. All the others just didn't happen. Then the penalized comes under scrutiny and is profiled and becomes a repeat offender. No other penalties occurred only the ones the refs called. At least we know the refs are not accused of taking bribes. Just the Patriots are cheating the entire NFL would be headline free from controversy. Well with TB12 gone they could only cheat half as much. So they are working on it!

Up in New England it’s called “ illusion of Truth “ 

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Victor Davis Hanson-The NFL is limiting their future:

 

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

The National Football League celebrated its 100th anniversary last year. This should be a time of self-congratulation for the brutal sport, which has no similar counterpart outside the United States.

The NFL’s megaprofits dwarf those of other professional sports in the U.S. The Super Bowl, not the World Series, is America’s national sports event.

The league survived all sorts of crises in the past. It was one of the first professional sports to integrate its teams, doing so in the 1920s. But the integration unfortunately ceased, and the NFL didn’t reintegrate until the mid-’40s, becoming one of the last sports leagues to embrace fully a racially-blind meritocracy.

 

The NFL successfully absorbed the rival American Football league in 1966. So far, the NFL has avoided federal safety regulations that could curb the incidence of physical trauma inherent in the sport.

The league’s owners are a cross-section of America’s most successful entrepreneurs and old-money families — many of them politically well-connected.

Yet the NFL is in deep trouble like never before.

In 2016, San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick refused to stand for the national anthem. He claimed he was protesting the treatment of African-Americans.

 

Mr. Kaepernick was an odd revolutionary. His mother is White, his father is an African American of Ghanaian-Nigerian ancestry, and he was raised by a middle-class White couple. Mr. Kaepernick’s only prior controversy was being accused by another player of using the N-word. He denied it but was still fined by the league.

Mr. Kaepernick’s rejection of “The Star-Spangled Banner” eventually spread throughout the NFL. Even though he was a backup quarterback, Mr. Kaepernick became a resistance idol. Soon he was a corporate ad man, pitching Nike sneakers.

Then game attendance fell. So did television viewership. Apparently, lots of fans had no desire to spend their Sundays watching 20-something multimillionaires lecture them that the American flag was not worth honoring.

In 2018, the league belatedly banned players from kneeling for the national anthem. By then, Mr. Kaepernick had left football and become a megaphone for even more corporate sponsors.

 

Now the NFL is in the news amid national protests and violence following the killing of George Floyd at the hands of police.

The inspirational song “Lift Every Voice and Sing” — also known as the Black national anthem — will be played before every game of the first week of the season. The league is considering letting players wear protest insignia on their helmets or jerseys. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell apologized to players for not listening to them about racism.

Yet the NFL capitulation poses fundamental problems for the league. It has now essentially green-lighted the sort of activism that in the last few years has been eating away its profits.

Racial issues are often virtue-signaled in the NFL — but almost never in an honest way. New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees recently objected to players not honoring the flag. But he quickly caved when a media mob damned him. In contrast, Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver DeSean Jackson posted a series of anti-Semitic tweets last week, even falsely attributing a quote to Adolf Hitler. That disconnect posed a bizarre question for the NFL: Is it worse for a player to be pro-American flag or anti-Semitic?

NFL owners and head coaches are almost all White. But nearly three-quarters of the players are Black. Those who play the game obviously want to see more diversity in coaching and ownership.

 

In a culture so obsessed with identity politics, is it the players or the owners and coaches (or both) who do not “look like America”?

Given that about 13% of the U.S. population is Black, and given that the Black Lives Matter movement embraces concepts like proportional representation, today’s NFL teams hardly qualify as diverse. Social activists might argue that the league should mentor and recruit more Latinos, Asian-Americans and Native Americans to better reflect their percentages of our diverse national population.

Perhaps an NFL compromise could ensure that 30 percent of coaches and owners are non-White, thus reflecting current U.S. demography. But then, in reciprocity, the players would match such mandatory demographic diversity — leading to Native Americans, Latinos, Asians, Whites and those of mixed ancestry accounting for 87 percent of the player population. The NBA might also take note.

 

This progressive model of proportional representation could also apply to overrepresented White athletes in hockey, tennis, golf and swimming — sports faulted by identity politics groups as being unfairly overrepresented by Whites.

Obviously, such racial gerrymandering will not happen because fans value meritocracy over ethnic affiliations.

Or at least they did.

 

If the multibillion-dollar NFL decides that multimillionaire players have no obligation to stand to honor a collective national anthem, and that there will be separate anthems and politicized uniforms, then millions of Americans will quietly shrug and change the channel.

And that silent protest will make the 2016-17 anthem protest look like child’s play.

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The Ravens just announced that at least the for the first part of the season (whatever that means) there will be no fans allowed at the games. I do know that Miami as of yesterday was going to allow a limited number of fans. Not sure about any other teams.

Edited by jimmy1956
Speeeling

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