Sngl2th

Flies you don't like/don't fish anymore

Rate this topic

43 posts in this topic

Clousers have never been a magic fly for me.  Part of the reason is I spent about 4 years tying them wrong.  Bob Clouser gave a presentation at one of my fly fishing clubs.  I brought one of my Clousers with me and showed it to him.  He told me "nice buck tail jig"  He showed me how to tie one correctly, but I still don't fish them.  I just don't have any confidence in them, besides I got hit in the back of my head with a large early one I tied up.  It hurt.

Woolly Buggers have not caught me a lot of fish.  I do carry three colors in my fly boxes.  I don't catch fish on the standard sizes.  I catch fish with size 16 or 18 ones, mainly trout and on ones tied on size 2 or size 1 4 XL hooks

Surf Candies-  They look good, just about indestructible.  Just haven't had much luck with them.  I do  well with bait fish pattern tied with flash blended Mirror Image or Senyo Lazer Dub. 

EP fibers or any other fiber I have to trim to shape are anathema.  Put a pair of trimming scissors in my hand and disaster results.  Sometimes it's not good to be OCD when tying flies.

I'm sure there are more fly patterns I don't like. 

 One thing I do like to do is add a new fly pattern to my fly boxes each year.  Either one I've come up with or an old pattern I've stumbled across.  Sometimes they don't make it through the season.  Others are still in my box.  The best one I added in the last couple of years has been the Calcasieu Pig Boat.  It's a 70 year old pattern.  I just updated it using modern materials, spinner bait skirts and skirt layers.  It's been deadly on warm water bass. Figure with the right colors it would make a great squid pattern.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, The Fisherman said:

Certainly, to each his or her own. Fish the way you like.

 

Very respectfully, if more anglers adopted a trout mentality and applied it to striper fishing, they would catch more stripers. And don't take my word for it. Ask @TheGraveyardShift about his experiences using smaller flies on a team of three, a very trouty approach...

 

:-)

 

Steve Culton

When river like conditions set up a "trout" approach can often be the ticket for sure.  I have also been applying the use of indicator fishing at night in those same scenarios which is very "trouty".  Leave no stone unturned is my current philosophy to fishing.  Trying new things and becoming more versatile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Jim H said:

:agree:

 

Graveyard, that's some great comments, and insight! :theman:

 

I don't care to fish deep with fly tackle. I've done it in the 20' to 30' range plenty, from a boat, but get below 30', I much rather fish with other tackle. I have sinking lines in a couple of sink rates for when I needed them in strong currents or deeper waters, but it's never been my favorite way to fish with fly gear. For the most part, I've also always been a shallow water angler with fly gear, because where I fished most was shallow, mostly under 10' in depth. When I've had to fish deeper, or stronger currents, I acquired what gear I needed an adapted. I don't think a lot of folks are willing to do that these days.

 

Casting Clouser Minnows or any heavily weighted fly doesn't bother me at all either, nor does using heavier fly gear to do it.

I've noticed a trend in that regard, that a lot of folks seem to have become wussies about what weight outfits they'll use and recommend to others. They worry about fractions of an ounce difference in the physical weight of their gear. Many make comments such as " it will wear you out if you cast a 8, 9 or 10 wt. all day". Well, it may, but I've been worn out before. That's what getting some rest afterwards should be about! It's not as easy on me as it was when I was younger, but so what! 

 

I've mentioned on here before, I use a 10 wt often for LM bass fishing. I use what I feel is appropriate for the fishing I'm doing, where I'm fishing and of course the flies I use. Not because I'm concerned about getting tired.

 

I have no problems casting even very heavily weighted Clouser Minnows, but for the waters I've fished, most of the time, they didn't need to be that heavy, and I used to tie some much heavier than was needed. I lost a lot of flies to bottom snags because they were too heavy. I really like your comment about having a variety, and I do the same thing.

 

My comments here may not apply to a lot of folks who regularly contribute here, but it does seem to me to be a common theme when folks start discussing fly fishing for some fish species other than trouts, that they want to use very light gear. Some say they use 4 & 5 wt's for bass as an example with "big" flies. I call that the trout mentality, and I have no issue with anyone who targets trout. However, other fish often require other methods & gear and certainly require adjusting the mindset and thought process. 

Sometimes I do very strange setups that people don't understand.  For example I make floating eel flies to fish on a 500 grain 9 ips sinking line.  People see the floating eel and think its a surface lure, but its actually designed to be fished near bottom structure in shallower inlets with fast current.  You want enough float that the sinking line never buries the fly in the bottom but it looks like a live eel which will try to swim down to the bottom in an inlets current.  You need different flotation levels so as current slows down or speeds up you can alter bouyancy to get fly to hang down in the bottom third of water column during the mend and stays there during the swing.  That head down tail undulating towards surface position near bottom has been the key.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, The Graveyard Shift said:

Sometimes I do very strange setups that people don't understand.  For example I make floating eel flies to fish on a 500 grain 9 ips sinking line.  People see the floating eel and think its a surface lure, but its actually designed to be fished near bottom structure in shallower inlets with fast current.  You want enough float that the sinking line never buries the fly in the bottom but it looks like a live eel which will try to swim down to the bottom in an inlets current.  You need different flotation levels so as current slows down or speeds up you can alter bouyancy to get fly to hang down in the bottom third of water column during the mend and stays there during the swing.  That head down tail undulating towards surface position near bottom has been the key.  

That's actually why the Crease Fly was designed as it is. It started as a subsurface fly, but most folks use it on the surface. The flat sides cause it to dart about. This is no different than fishing a floating lure with a dropper rig to get it down & allow it to work in the current without snagging bottom. The first lure i remember fishing that way was a 5" Rebel Minnow back around the early 80's.

 

Great information! Shows that you're really thinking about the use & matching the forage based on it's movement and not just tying a "different" fly to do the same thing. :clap:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of good info here. Thanks TGS for your thoughtful post on how flies have their purpose.

 

I've had a lot of luck with crease flies above and below the surface. I have also been trying a lot of new tactics this year, and that means new flies. Just tied up this lobster pattern with a reversed popper body as the head. Going to use my 30 foot T-18 head to sink it and hope it rides just above the rocks. Looks like RM Soft Short. 

 

I should add that a number of flies I don't like/use include little experiments of mine from past seasons. There's a lot to be said for the classics. 

IMG_7439.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One big style change I've made is I no longer fish poppers, crease flies, or anything with a big fat head with it tied to the hook like snake flies - all are now tied on tubes.

 

So I mount a foam cylinder on a tube and tie bucktail and estaz on a hook for a Bob's banger or the crease part of the crease fly on the tube with a dressed hook behind it.  Even the spun deer hair for a snake fly goes on the tube (its easier to spin too)

 

No more tippet twist, much better hook ups, and they last a lot longer for pike or blues... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been afraid to get into to tube flies, with all the stuff I'd need to buy.

 

I should have included in this thread underappreciated flies. I think the Seaducer is a killer fly that seems to have been somewhat forgotten.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess for me it’s a lack of interest in learning an encyclopedia’s worth of tactics because I only want big fish on the fly rod and I don’t want to spend a ton of time or energy getting them. I use the fly rod early in the season till early July when there are lots of huge bass around, then later in the season for albies. When big bass are around in numbers I know where to look and I know what to throw, and I do very well. Once those fish move on I set it down until albies show. Sure, I could get a 25-pounder here and there amidst countless schoolies, but I’m just not into it anymore. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Seadogg said:

I guess for me it’s a lack of interest in learning an encyclopedia’s worth of tactics because I only want big fish on the fly rod and I don’t want to spend a ton of time or energy getting them. I use the fly rod early in the season till early July when there are lots of huge bass around, then later in the season for albies. When big bass are around in numbers I know where to look and I know what to throw, and I do very well. Once those fish move on I set it down until albies show. Sure, I could get a 25-pounder here and there amidst countless schoolies, but I’m just not into it anymore. 

Out of curiosity how do you spend your time between stripers and albies?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

2 hours ago, The Graveyard Shift said:

Out of curiosity how do you spend your time between stripers and albies?

The last few years, after the big fish move on my motivation declines big time. The gear (spin and usually fly) is on the boat, but it’s mainly used to kill any extra time, which isn’t much because of how busy I am this time of year. There are a few areas that currently have decent fish I can produce on fly and topwater, but I only have time to hit them occasionally this time of year. Also, the daytime fishing in Buzzards Bay drops off significantly by mid-July, and I spend so much time out here I’ve lost the desire to fish at night anymore, which can still be productive at times. I used to wetsuit a ton years back. I usually see bonito during August so I’ll keep an 8-weight on board just in case, but I don’t start wielding the fly rod as a primary tool until albie season, which for me starts in September. At that point I don’t put it down. I guess I’ve gotten lazy over the years, but I have things very dialed in when the jumbo bite is hot. I put a lot of time in when the stakes are highest. “Minimum effort, maximum results” is my mantra when it comes to fishing these days. 

Edited by Seadogg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I still like candy flies made with natural materials, I'm no longer a fan of the original versions made with the stiff synthetic hair (the exception being the softer craft fur synthetic hair)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, albacized said:

While I still like candy flies made with natural materials, I'm no longer a fan of the original versions made with the stiff synthetic hair (the exception being the softer craft fur synthetic hair)

They need to "swim".Agreed.On a few occaisions fishing outflows on the flats I've encountered fish in holes that would not take anything unless the fly was dead drifted along the bottom to the fish.Any other method of movement just spooked the fish right out of its holding place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.