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foxfai

A cold snap that shut down the bites?

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I've heard of this phrase many times but never understood why?

 

Can someone explain to me after a storm rolls through and a cold fronts rolls in(here in the northeast), all the bites gets shut down and fish doesn't eat anymore? 

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I’m still learning myself but more so than the immediate cold air temperatures which hardly has an effect on the water temps this time of year, you’re dealing with barometric pressure that’ll put the fish out of whack. I have most of my luck before the storm hits and then the bite is off after the storm. Besides the more obvious factors, I personally have been keeping track of everything this year just so I can eventually start finding the little nuances.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

In my opinion based on past experiences cold snaps usually occur later in the season and typically meant a major wind change affecting inshore water temperatures which shut down the bite after a redistribution or movement of bait. Depending on how late in the season it occurred the shutdown was usually temporary after the immediate influx of colder water had a chance to dissipate after a few tidal exchanges. Any major change during a major bite is unwelcome but did a good job of reducing efforts by the masses of casters. Current charts indicate the most likely times warmer water may work to your advantage afterwards. 

Edited by SC

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I always attributed this to spring fishing, when the water is cold.  Cold fronts in the fall and late summer i think can help kick up a bite, bringing in cooler water when the inshore temps are high.  But always learn something new

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Coastal and ocean born storms create currents that push warm surface water toward the direction their moving and then leave an up-welled wake of cold water stirred up from deeper water in the void of warm surface water as they pass.  Pressure or unrelated winds are secondary, though significant of shore winds after a storm passes will keep that cold water on shore.....however hard on shore winds for a few days usually settle water temperatures and clean things up as well, quicker on the moons with stronger tides.

Edited by DeepBlue85

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2 hours ago, DeepBlue85 said:

Coastal and ocean born storms create currents that push warm surface water toward the direction their moving and then leave an up-welled wake of cold water stirred up from deeper water in the void of warm surface water as they pass.  Pressure or unrelated winds are secondary, though significant of shore winds after a storm passes will keep that cold water on shore.....however hard on shore winds for a few days usually settle water temperatures and clean things up as well, quicker on the moons with stronger tides.

This make much more sense. Fish doesn't like warm waters. Per se if they want "stable" water, they will have to go deep to avoid difference in temperature that the storm sturred up and just go deep. 

 

Another question this brings up, where would the bait go? Assuming after a storm there is a lot of junk in the water. Will water temp effect them? Do seaweed in water provide them with shelter? Do they go deep too where big fish goes?

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That's interesting, given the current storm in New England, shall we stop fishing until early next week when the storm ends?

I was thinking the lower temperature would be better for fishing, anyone tried fishing in these two days? How was it?

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Sometimes with fronts you get wind, rain, heavy currents, temperature and barometric swings. Runoff from rain dirties the water, changes PH, adds chemicals, raises levels, etc, all of which can be wind or current driven. From the smallest bait on up, weather affects most feeding.

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3 hours ago, foxfai said:

This make much more sense. Fish doesn't like warm waters. Per se if they want "stable" water, they will have to go deep to avoid difference in temperature that the storm sturred up and just go deep. 

 

Another question this brings up, where would the bait go? Assuming after a storm there is a lot of junk in the water. Will water temp effect them? Do seaweed in water provide them with shelter? Do they go deep too where big fish goes?

 

 

 

Depends on the bait your talking about, bunker being filter feeders will congregate around areas of nutrient rich upwelling an often times show up thick on browned out beaches the morning after a storm blows through and the off shore winds generally associated with post storm conditions help to draw them to shore.  Squid an small bait usually get completly blown out and in some cases small bait patterns can change for the rest of the season as a result. It really depends on the intensity of the storm,  It's always a gamble but some of the best bites have been the morning after a storm, sometimes during and often times right before.  Just go out an fish an enjoy the unpredictable.

Edited by DeepBlue85

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