jw

raising your kayak seat ?

6 posts in this topic

Seems like the latest up grade to kayaks is to raise your seat , much more comfortable  and dryer .

Any one here trying it ?

I was looking at ascend seats , they seem nice a bit of customizing is needed .

My main concern is raising my center of gravity  . 

Any thoughts ? or recommendations 

I have a Emotion fisherman 14 ft

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I tried placing a 5/8” pad under the seat of a narrow kayak that had a very low seat. It was very noticeable, and I promptly removed it while on the water. Would definitely have been drier, but I felt Too tall in the saddle. Last year when I tried a newer Outback for 5 days with the raised seat it was not noticeable, but it’s a much wider yak. You could try the same thing with different sized shims/pads and see if it will work before you spend on a taller seat.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

 I have been using the lawn chairs in the high position for close to 10 years and I thought I might be able to contribute to this thread. 

Riding tall is probably not for everyone, but it's absolutely right for me and I have enjoyed fishing more from the higher vantage. I am typically fishing rivers and creeks and the higher perspective lowers horizon lines and helps scouting without getting out of the boat. I am able to see more fish and I spook less when site fishing.  I get more distance and greater accuracy when casting and like fighting fish from the higher CoG.   Well, most fish.

The transition to standing is so much smoother and the lawn chairs all day comfort is becoming more important as I age. I have also fished lakes and salt in the elevated position with success. 

There are a few challenges.

I had to change from using a 230cm paddle shaft to a  260. Its a lot of paddle but its what works for me.  Without the extra length my catch phase was too close and any sort of strong brace could send me swimming.

There are a lot of duck and cover moments on some parts of my local water and riding higher sets you up to take the hit full on. It is not enjoyable. Anyway, I wanted to add something from the dude that believes in riding higher. Here are a few fish caught from the higher CoG and some moments when it would help to be lower..

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big marlin.jpg

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Edited by HydroSpider
grammatical error

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I have the hi/lo Max seat on my Wilderness Systems RIDE 115x and love the high position most of the time; but it does reduce stability quite a bit.  When the weather gets a little snotty I'm happy about how easy it is to lower that seat for more stability and paddle power when wind and current kick up.  High seats are great, but I wouldn't want one that wasn't easily lowered on the fly.

Edited by DanKing

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Mine has a high and a low position. When I’m on freshwater usually the seats in the high position but I generally keep it on the low one for salt water. The salt is pretty much always a low seat day. It makes surf launching and fighting wind and waves a lot easier. Sometimes if the bay is super calm I’ll keep it in the high position but then I’m always worried about getting waked by some moron in a jet ski. Then again I do love in jersey so that may be different in other places.

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