Bobonli

Striper Rigs

Rate this topic

15 posts in this topic

Hello. This is my first post here and I thank you in advance for helping me get started.

 

I’d like some suggestions for a fly rod and line for striped bass. I live ridiculously close to salt water fishing on Long Island (North shore of Nassau County)  and never gave much consideration to it, focusing mostly on streams and ponds. Earlier this week I went wading off the local beach and it’s pretty cool though my 5 weight doesn’t quite have enough oomph to cast bigger flies. What a treat to fish 5 minutes from home and not have to drive 90 minutes to a river, or worry about snagging on branches and rocks.

 

I’ve made a couple of inquiries at stores and have variously been steered toward 8, 9 and 10 weight rods, with some suggesting a traditional floating line and others a sinking line. I suppose this is very salesperson-dependent. The #10 seemed excessive on its face, but then the shopkeeper spoke about the need to overcome wind. I don't want to rely solely on a shopkeeper's advice. Hoping to get some practical guidance from those who are actively fishing in the area.

 

Almost all of the application will be from the shore ( I don’t have a boat...maybe at some point I'll go out with a guide) on Long Island ( including Queens) maybe CT.

 

Thanks,

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob,

 

I would say you cant go wrong with either a 9wt or 10wt. I started off using an 8wt and a lot of people use 8wt as their primary rod, but once the wind starts howling, you'll be glad to have a 9wt or 10wt, and now use a 9wt the majority of the time. In regards to lines I would go with a striper coldwater intermediate (Rio and Airlo are what I use). Hopefully this helps. There's a couple of good chains about this topic that have way more detailed answers  (in regards to specific rods, rod wts, lines and reels. ). 

 

Good Luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks. The common theme I’m hearing from shops is “9 weight Is a good all rounder but the 10 would be nice in wind or if you eventually fish from a boat.”

This is a lot like asking “what car should I buy?” in that a shop might suggest the item they most want to sell you! I just want a good starting point for the places I’ll most often fish, and not be caught under or over lined for the fish and conditions. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bobonli said:

Thanks. The common theme I’m hearing from shops is “9 weight Is a good all rounder but the 10 would be nice in wind or if you eventually fish from a boat.”

This is a lot like asking “what car should I buy?” in that a shop might suggest the item they most want to sell you! I just want a good starting point for the places I’ll most often fish, and not be caught under or over lined for the fish and conditions. 

A shop doesn’t generally care if you buy a nine or a ten weight rod :) There’s no right answer, this isn’t a math problem. Would you tell someone they need a five weight to fish your favorite stream and tell them a four weight is too light and a six weight is too heavy? No...it depends on you, the rod, the line, the fish, the flies, etc, etc. There are nine weights that fish like tens and tens that fish like nines. Not a math problem - you can’t go wrong with either...find a good deal on a decent nine or ten weight and get started :)

 

A good compromise on lines is to get an intermediate line - very versatile. You’ll figure out what you like faster and better than some guy in a shop trying to answer vague-ish questions :) If you want someone to tell you which line would be best for something specific you have to give them all the specifics...and still they’ll only be able to tell you what they like,  it what you’ll like. Remember, it’s not a math problem - there isn’t a right answer, there are only opinions and you’ll always be the best judge of what you like :)

 

TimS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I reread the above - did I mention it’s not a math problem? ;) I bought that up so many times because I had a hard time convincing my nephew and brother when they first started fishing - they always thought there was one right answer - like ‘what size sinker should I use?’  or ‘what size hook?’ - when a wide range of either would be fine. Same thing with fly rods and lines and leaders - there’s a large range of right answers...you’ll be the best judge of what fits how you want to fish...but it’s going to take some time on the beach to figure it out - that’s the fun part :th:

 

TimS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 mins ago, TimS said:

A shop doesn’t generally care if you buy a nine or a ten weight rod :) There’s no right answer, this isn’t a math problem. Would you tell someone they need a five weight to fish your favorite stream and tell them a four weight is too light and a six weight is too heavy? No...it depends on you, the rod, the line, the fish, the flies, etc, etc. There are nine weights that fish like tens and tens that fish like nines. Not a math problem - you can’t go wrong with either...find a good deal on a decent nine or ten weight and get started :)

 

 

TimS

I couldn't agree more. It is unfortunate that rods are not labeled by grain window. This would really solve the  paradigm of what is a 9 weight really. Manufacturers of rods have already built in the ability to use lines a 1/2 a weight heavier to compliment the line manufacturers complicating this even further. Todays 10-12 weights are so light and depending on certain manufacturers are a joy to cast. It is really a matter of preference. Casting style and what grain window you choose to fish.  Strange so many different rods for each type of preference. The only sure thing is to try as many as possible and find that grain window of comfort. Like you said there are 10's and 9's that are so close you have to cast them to realize this similarity. Prices could be in your favor if you research what you decided for your self in exploring these options. Not being hemmed in to just one specific weight. Excellent advice. Wish some one told me years ago when I invested heavily in this craziness. It is almost like cheating at this point with lines  today being so versatile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

Reading the above it all makes sense. A good shop should care pretty passionately in helping you find the right rod. Happy first time customers become second time customers . But having said that some will unknowingly offer advice which is not quite on the money.

It is difficult to totally hit the nail square  on the head when beginning a new sport but you can get close enough and then it is a learning process where you will establish your preferences.

Some rod makers build rods pretty close to the ratings they inscribe on them.

A 9 wt that really is a nine weight will happily cast a 9 wt and 10 wt line that are made to AAFTM standards.

I don’t get to cast every rod out there and models change so fast it’s hard to keep up. In your position I would place my trust in Scott at the Bears Den. You can easily google up the Bears Den to get the phone number.

I suspect that Orvis May have a rod within their line up which would fit your initial needs. They cover most price points. Scott gets to see a lot of rods and gets to cast them to on the shops casting court so will have a good handle on what’s what.

Apart from the gear learning to use it well is pretty fundamental. Whilst it is possible to get some kind of cast from self teaching it is by far the worst way and you can be stuck with a poor cast for life which kinda makes the sport less fun. I think that most guys ignore the suggestion to get some professional casting lessons but it is about one of the best steps you can take .

Enjoy the journey it is riddled with fun ,humour and the making of many great new friendships.

 

Mike

Edited by Mike Oliver

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone for suggestions and feedback. Yes, I know there's no one-size-fits-all for most things in life. I was just hoping to validate/verify some of the information I was getting before making a purchase. 

 

To Mike's point about getting instruction, I completely agree particularly since my line of work involves coaching. Better to learn right the first time (and get follow up coaching) then to start with bad habits. I'd say I'm a mediocre to average fresh water caster based on what I see from other people where I fish. I know I'll need different and better skills on the beach and I intend to get some help.

 

I'm open to suggestions if any of you know of a good casting instructor within a reasonable drive of western Long Island. PM me if sharing publicly violates  forum rules. I'm always willing to learn something new, which is what brought me to salt water in the first place: new skill set to learn and experiences to have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got to a shop and test cast a few rods in your budget in 9 and 10 weights with 2 or 3 lines.  I think river bay outfitters isn’t to far from you, I’m sure Paul could hook you up 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wind keeps many fly fishermen home throughout the season.  I always recommend go heavier so 10wt.  Personally I would say you are better off with a cheap 8wt and a cheap 10wt than buying one mid priced 9wt.  

 

I routinely fish a 12wt and will fish wind over 20mphs.  The only weather that keeps me home is extreme waves or lighting.  

 

I will admit I did not initially learn on a 10wt, but I did not really notice any difference the first time I had to cast a 10wt or 12wt from casting my 8wt.  The mechanics are all the same, but now that I have should problems I can feel the difference casting the heavier rods.  That is why I know use two hand overhead casting as it avoids the shoulder pain on the heavier lines.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I settled on a 9 weight after casting rods at the not-so-local shop. For what I'll use it for, 9 was the best starting point. And being able to compare rods was worth the car drive to the shop because not only did one rod stand out as easier to cast from my perspective, the shop keeper saw the difference and said "you definitely cast that better." 

 

Thank you all for your assistance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would have told you to start with a two hand rod lol. Wind is almost always a factor, and a heavy two hander makes life a lot easier. I wish I had switched years ago. Fortunately I never invested heavily in single hand in rod and reels, always using used stuff that I scrounged up. Seriously, look into spey before you go too far! Single hand is great for sight fishing flats, but everywhere else I will take the two.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Bobonli said:

I settled on a 9 weight after casting rods at the not-so-local shop. For what I'll use it for, 9 was the best starting point. And being able to compare rods was worth the car drive to the shop because not only did one rod stand out as easier to cast from my perspective, the shop keeper saw the difference and said "you definitely cast that better." 

 

Thank you all for your assistance.

Good for you. Most guys spend too much time dithering around. A 9 wt will make for a very nice rod.

 

To start off with I think single hand rods are a really good choice. I moved to a Two Hand rod for a lot of my fishing these  days on open beaches but I am glad I kicked off with the shorter rod to learn the ropes. I fish both and enjoy both a great deal.

I hope you find our sport as addictive as so many of us do on SOL.

My spin tackle does not see much daylight these days. Fly can have that effect on you.

Enjoy.

 

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/9/2020 at 9:08 PM, Bobonli said:

Hello. This is my first post here and I thank you in advance for helping me get started.

 

I’d like some suggestions for a fly rod and line for striped bass. I live ridiculously close to salt water fishing on Long Island (North shore of Nassau County)  and never gave much consideration to it, focusing mostly on streams and ponds. Earlier this week I went wading off the local beach and it’s pretty cool though my 5 weight doesn’t quite have enough oomph to cast bigger flies. What a treat to fish 5 minutes from home and not have to drive 90 minutes to a river, or worry about snagging on branches and rocks.

 

I’ve made a couple of inquiries at stores and have variously been steered toward 8, 9 and 10 weight rods, with some suggesting a traditional floating line and others a sinking line. I suppose this is very salesperson-dependent. The #10 seemed excessive on its face, but then the shopkeeper spoke about the need to overcome wind. I don't want to rely solely on a shopkeeper's advice. Hoping to get some practical guidance from those who are actively fishing in the area.

 

Almost all of the application will be from the shore ( I don’t have a boat...maybe at some point I'll go out with a guide) on Long Island ( including Queens) maybe CT.

 

Thanks,

Bob

reed the tred 

Two handed rod,lot of good information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started on an 8wt and settled on a 10wt.  My decision to move up was dictated by wind and fly size.  There wasn't a huge difference in casting either until a breeze kicked up and I started tossing larger squids where the 8 struggled. In my opinion there is no substitute to actually casting the rod though.  Might feel nice at the shop but you won't know until you toss it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.