kype

trickle charger question

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might be a stupid question but my boat has a trickle charger on it. is this good enough to get the battery to a full charge or do i need to remove the battery and hook it up to a real charger. 

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1 hour ago, kype said:

might be a stupid question but my boat has a trickle charger on it. is this good enough to get the battery to a full charge or do i need to remove the battery and hook it up to a real charger. 

if it's a deep cycle battery they like a long,slow charge.

a car battery that's stone dead will take a week to fully charge.

I left my ignition on and 2 days later the battery was dead,stone dead,not even the radio would play.

I put it on my trickle charger for 3 days and it still was not charged enough to start my LTD.

think of a battery as a sponge,it needs to be fully saturated to work correctly.

hope this helps.

my trickle charger puts 2 amp per hr rate max.

HH

Edited by Heavy Hooksetter

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Trickle chargers are meant to be used on batteries that are being stored for a long time, typically during winter. If you can find a “smart” charger that will cut off and on to prevent overcharging that would be ideal.

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Does your boat motor have an alternator that charges the battery?  If so, then your battery (which I assume is a start/deep cycle AGM) only needs a maintenance charger,  If not, then you are best off with a Marine on-board battery charger with a bank for each battery.  The charger should monitor the battery temperature as an integral function - AGM batteries overheat when overcharged, causing hydrogen gas to form when the battery acid is boiled off.  If the cells are exposed by this loss of acid, a spark jumping between cells will ignite the hydrogen, and the battery will explode.

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I don't iknow the characteristics of your charger, but a lot of marine chargers will charge at a variable rate, providing a more rapid charge rate when your battery has been drawn down and a maintenance trickle charge otherwise.  As earlier posters noted, you want to avoid overcharging, and also want to avoid letting your battery water levels fall too low (refill with distilled water, not tap).

 

I've got four batteries on my boat, and have gone through a host of charger-related woes (some related to the chargers themselves, others to how the shop installed it), but the arrangement I described above is what works.

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thanks for the insight. will be getting more stuff together on the boat today, ill take a picture of the battery and trickle charger

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5 mins ago, Heavy Hooksetter said:

are you having problems with your batteries charging?

HH

i just bought the boat last weekend. just going over things. i should pick up a battery meter. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

38 mins ago, kype said:

i just bought the boat last weekend. just going over things. i should pick up a battery meter. 

oh,I see.

well,it should be installed correctly already.

the thing is when to use it.

not sure on that about boats myself.

not sure on when to plug it in,perhaps after a day of good use?

maybe you could ask in the boating forum.

HH

Edited by Heavy Hooksetter

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20 hours ago, Heavy Hooksetter said:

oh,I see.

well,it should be installed correctly already.

the thing is when to use it.

not sure on that about boats myself.

not sure on when to plug it in,perhaps after a day of good use?

maybe you could ask in the boating forum.

HH

Given the problems that I had with professionally installed battery chargers, it's never safe to bet that it was done right the first time; at best, one can hope.

 

I keep my boat plugged into shore power and the charger working 24/7.  If nothing else, it assures that the bilge pumps will have power should we get an unusually heavy rain, or some other problem that allows water to get into the boat.  

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yes,very smart move.

my uncles boat went down in the marina once,it was just 3 feet of water but,we got her up by running a cable to his truck and it worked the hand held pump he made,got her up in about 30 minutes,then the bilge was switched on and she came right back up to normal.

got a good cleaning at the same time too.

HH

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On 7/5/2020 at 1:58 AM, FlatWing said:

Does your boat motor have an alternator that charges the battery?  If so, then your battery (which I assume is a start/deep cycle AGM) only needs a maintenance charger,  If not, then you are best off with a Marine on-board battery charger with a bank for each battery.  The charger should monitor the battery temperature as an integral function - AGM batteries overheat when overcharged, causing hydrogen gas to form when the battery acid is boiled off.  If the cells are exposed by this loss of acid, a spark jumping between cells will ignite the hydrogen, and the battery will explode.

Most agm batteries are sealed.

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Kype, you have  a real charger a Minn kota automatic which will go to float mode when charged. What are you using is basically a starting battery  with a deep cycle rating also? If on a  outboard boat while motor is running it is charging, and plugging in the charger to be sure battery is fully charged  will be fine as it will not get discharged.  If using a trolling motor or sitting for long periods with everything on and a bait well  perhaps  then it comes  down  to needing a second or third battery , and possibly a larger charger with a higher amp rating to reduce  time to charge. My last two  boats were twin engine boats with duel battery  setup , with each motor having it’s own battery  but we have a starter  solenoid tying the two together in. All house circuits are on the one battery and second  battery is the backup if needed as there is no extra load on it.

Sort of depends what you are using the  battery for, but I always had two batteries on  my boats even single engine ones with a battery selector switch, batteries do fail, alternators do fail, cables break.....jack

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