JimKu

Fluke fishing tips from shore or jetty

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I fish from shore and jetty only. I started fluke fishing last summer and have caught some. I tried for the first time this year yesterday from a jetty and caught 5 in about an hour. I didn't measure them but I think they were slightly below legal size. I fish with a bucktail and 4" gulp mullet. Bucktail size just enough to keep it off bottom.

Sea Robins seem to like the fluke presentation. I also caught a sea robin yesterday on a smack it jr and sp minnow.

 

Does time of day have any effect on the bite? Is it typically better in the early morning or sundown or anytime during the day? Do they bite at night? 

To be honest I usually switch over to fluke if nothing else is going on with other fish. Nice to get some kind of bite.

 

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Any bite is better than no bite, except for mosquito and greenfly bites.

 

You're doing what you oughta do. Moving water is generally better .... but. Fluke will move around in slack conditions, too. If they weren't here on that tide, they may come within reach during slack and then bite on the opposite tide.

 

If the crowd permits, remember to fish the sides of the jetty before going out on the jetty. There is usually a hole one side or the other. The hole is full of weed, probably, but losing leadheads comes with the territory.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

P.S.  Now and then a fluke gets caught at night, usually in water that's subject to continuous illumination, but that's happenstance. Fluke are daylight feeders, though it doesn't need a lot of light to get them active. Generally, a fluke caught at night is a fluke.  :)

Edited by BrianBM
Stupid typo.

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If you DO have a patch of illuminated water handy, like the Shinnecock Canal or a dockside, give it a try, just for the halibut. :)  :)

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Fluke do bite at night. As Brian said, look for areas with dock lights or other types of lighting that reach the water. 
 

Fluke also enter the very shallow water (even a few inches deep) at night looking for easy meals and can be caught quite easily BUT you have to be stealthy. 

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Many think of fluke or flounder as  a fish of sandy open bottom, but like other fish they tend to congregate in transitional areas. Drop offs, edge of weed beds, eddies, etc.  If you are fishing jetties, focus on the area right where the sand meets the rocks. 

 

I have always had my best luck with flounder within the first hour or so after daybreak. To be honest, this may be self fulfilling. I have found the bite tends to slow at slack tide, even when casting/retrieving/trolling.

 

Bigger fish tend to like slower retrieves and bigger baits, but more so, the slower retrieve. This is where you have a slight advantage as a shore caster. You can slow the retrieve to increase your chances of bigger fish. 

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3 hours ago, wok167 said:

Many think of fluke or flounder as  a fish of sandy open bottom, but like other fish they tend to congregate in transitional areas. Drop offs, edge of weed beds, eddies, etc.  If you are fishing jetties, focus on the area right where the sand meets the rocks. 

 

I have always had my best luck with flounder within the first hour or so after daybreak. To be honest, this may be self fulfilling. I have found the bite tends to slow at slack tide, even when casting/retrieving/trolling.

 

Bigger fish tend to like slower retrieves and bigger baits, but more so, the slower retrieve. This is where you have a slight advantage as a shore caster. You can slow the retrieve to increase your chances of bigger fish. 

This reminds me ... the biggest fluke I ever saw caught from shore was taken in the early light of predawn by an angler fishing an eel, I think a live one, for striped bass. The fluke weighed ten pounds (he was carrying a small scale).  He didn't mind that catch at all .... who would?

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Great information. I tried the same spot today and only caught a sea robin. I couldn't move around on the jetty because it was wall to wall people. I was going to hit some other area's on my way home but there were just too many people out today which is not my style.

 

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Yes.  I avoid fishing on holiday weekends as a matter of course.

 

Many years ago, I fished Moriches west with friends on the Fourth. Not only was the place a madhouse, but we got pelted with spent fireworks.  Never again.

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if you are fishing inlets / jetties on the s side of long island (?) one thing ihave noticed with fluke is there tends to be a better bite on the incoming.  no science in this... just an observation over time.

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8 hours ago, nicknotsebastian said:

if you are fishing inlets / jetties on the s side of long island (?) one thing ihave noticed with fluke is there tends to be a better bite on the incoming.  no science in this... just an observation over time.

Sometimes, but not always IMHO.

Sometimes the warmer water of outgoing they are more active. Also, if you're near an bay, inlet etc., sometime outgoing washes food in the form of spearing, bay anchovies, mullet, peanuts etc., in which case they would be more actively feeding, sometimes.  

On the other hand, incoming can bring clean cooler water that is just what's needed in mid - late summer or after a blow that dirtied or weeded up the water. Again, sometimes.

JD

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3 hours ago, jjdbike said:

Sometimes, but not always IMHO.

Sometimes the warmer water of outgoing they are more active. Also, if you're near an bay, inlet etc., sometime outgoing washes food in the form of spearing, bay anchovies, mullet, peanuts etc., in which case they would be more actively feeding, sometimes.  

On the other hand, incoming can bring clean cooler water that is just what's needed in mid - late summer or after a blow that dirtied or weeded up the water. Again, sometimes.

JD

I find water temperature to make a big difference.

 

In the spring, around the inlet (if I fluke ifhs inshore, I usually fish around Fire Island Inlet, NY from a boat), the warmer water provided by the outgoing tide usually keeps the fish much more active than they are in the cold water brought in by the incoming.

 

But in the summer and early fall, when bay water temperatures can exceed 80 degrees (I had 82 on Friday in Babylon Cove), the cooler, clearer water of the incoming is generally much more productive, with the bite often dying an hour or so into the drop.  Often, there is a very clear color line where the clear, cool ocean water meets the warm, cloudy green water of the bay.  Fishing just on the clear side of the color line can be particularly productive.

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