joe0306

Asian Green Crabs for Stripers

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Look under a rock and you'll find one, or maybe a few. I'm wondering how effective these are for stripers. Does anyone have any experience in using them as bait. Since they are pretty small, I imagine I could put two on a 6/0 sized circle hook, but might have to add some weight for casting distance. I know Elias V uses them frequently in NC for redfish, but have not seen much info on them for stripers.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

before the era of seal overload on the outer cape, green crabs were primo bait for big bass in bays and estuaries.  would fish them on a  circle hook with a 3 or 4 ft leader to a bobber to keep them suspended and off the bottom.  caught many many big bass that way. 

 

(PS this was using european green crabs, not asian shore crabs)

Edited by Kookermonga

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16 mins ago, Kones1 said:

Floating jig heads were maid for those ! 

Would I be allowed to use jig heads with the crabs given that they are live bait? Wouldnt they have to be on circle hooks as of the recent regulation change?

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My interpretation is if you're going to bait and wait, you need to use circles. If you were going to cast and retrieve, you could at least make the argument you were attempting to comply with the law.

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Before the seals really moved in I use to hammer big bass rite out of Chatham harbor on two baits . One being a green crab with a hook placed under a rubber band . The second being as weird as it sounds baby dog fish . Not just any baby dog fish but the ones with the yoke sack still hanging . They would be falling out as the boats unloaded their catch and 20-40 pound bass could be seen slurping them down . Most captains or mates would give you a pale full if you just asked . Those were the good ole days prob 2000-2005

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3 hours ago, Wilgabeast said:

Before the seals really moved in I use to hammer big bass rite out of Chatham harbor on two baits . One being a green crab with a hook placed under a rubber band . The second being as weird as it sounds baby dog fish . Not just any baby dog fish but the ones with the yoke sack still hanging . They would be falling out as the boats unloaded their catch and 20-40 pound bass could be seen slurping them down . Most captains or mates would give you a pale full if you just asked . Those were the good ole days prob 2000-2005

I remember doing the same in scituate harbor with the baby dogs.

 

As for crabs, check out how they fish blue crabs for tarpon in the Florida keys. I have to imagine the same techniques would work here. I’ve seen plenty of bass sucking down crabs and small lobsters when hauling traps.

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They are deadly on big permit  site casting to individual fish on top   We spot them by looking for the dorsal fin slicing along the surface. They are real spooky and fight like mad. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

When I was commercial lobstering in CCB stripers eating lobsters could be a issue.    This was especially the case on Scorton Ledge.     The bass will follow the trap as it's being hauled up to the boat, and pick off the loose crabs or riders falling off it.      Once the trap was on board the boat,  my sternman and I started to go through it and cull the lobsters.  The bass would do any unusual thing.      It was almost a pavlovian response.     The bass would hide under the shadow on my lobster boat, sit there and pick off the lobsters my sternman and I would throw back.  Either because they were under sized or eggers.   It was cool watching 30-50 pounders feed, but not on my lobsters.     They would actually follow my boat from pot to pot and  do the same thing the entire string until I left the ledge area.     

In order to resolve this we stopped throwing back the shorts and eggers right there.    We'd temporarily store them in a couple totes and cover them in wet burlap.   Then we'd steam off to my next string.  When we got away from the area we'd dump them overboard and away from the bass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by bob_G

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1 hour ago, bob_G said:

When I was commercial lobstering in CCB stripers eating lobsters could be a issue.    This was especially the case on Scorton Ledge.     The bass will follow the trap as it's being hauled up to the boat, and pick off the loose crabs or riders falling off it.      Once the trap was on board the boat,  my sternman and I started to go through it and cull the lobsters.  The bass would do any unusual thing.      It was almost a pavlovian response.     The bass would hide under the shadow on my lobster boat, sit there and pick off the lobsters my sternman and I would throw back.  Either because they were under sized or eggers.   It was cool watching 30-50 pounders feed, but not on my lobsters.     They would actually follow my boat from pot to pot and  do the same thing the entire string until I left the ledge area.     

In order to resolve this we stopped throwing back the shorts and eggers right there.    We'd temporarily store them in a couple totes and cover them in wet burlap.   Then we'd steam off to my next string.  When we got away from the area we'd dump them overboard and away from the bass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your post made me think of this article. The author, a diver for lobsters, speaks about one experience he had with a bass that followed him for an hour looking to get a free lobster. It even tried to lure the diver to rocks where lobsters were located, but just out of reach for the bass. These fish are definitely smarter than I thought.

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You don't need a permit to harvest them, but you do need "permission", which can be obtained from the F&G marine office.

I think you need a permit in order to sell them as bait.

 

They are also good tog bait.

 

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16 mins ago, FishermanTim said:

You don't need a permit to harvest them, but you do need "permission", which can be obtained from the F&G marine office.

I think you need a permit in order to sell them as bait.

 

They are also good tog bait.

 

You need permission to flip rocks for crabs? In what state? I've never heard of that here in CT.

 

A friend of mine told me a story about catching a big bass while togging, but I think it was on a green crab not an asian.

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3 hours ago, nateD said:

You need permission to flip rocks for crabs? In what state? I've never heard of that here in CT.

 

A friend of mine told me a story about catching a big bass while togging, but I think it was on a green crab not an asian.

I said "in order to sell them"

I think (in MA) they need to get some idea of what you are doing with them and a rough idea of how many/much you take.

The topic was "Asian GREEN crabs". Now if it was Asian orange crabs......

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3 hours ago, FishermanTim said:

You don't need a permit to harvest them, but you do need "permission", which can be obtained from the F&G marine office.

I think you need a permit in order to sell them as bait.

 

They are also good tog bait.

 

Guess I am reading that wrong

 

3 mins ago, FishermanTim said:

I said "in order to sell them"

I think (in MA) they need to get some idea of what you are doing with them and a rough idea of how many/much you take.

The topic was "Asian GREEN crabs". Now if it was Asian orange crabs......

No such thing as an asian green crab, pretty sure he's talking about asian crabs not green crabs.

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