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foxfai

Blowing SW wind almost forever....

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Back in the 60's--70's when tin boats fished Chatham for biguns at night I recall spending the night at the --C-- buoy outside Chatham inlet in fog so thick your eyelashes had drops falling from them.

That light souwest breeze would carry the warmth from Nantucket sound water and mix it with the cold water on the Atlantic side of Monomoy and create the words greatest fog

If your coming in over the --bar--in fog without electronics, GOOD LUCK!

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Any wind in your face can be good for shore fishing. The issue is when the wind gets strong enough to muck up the water with silt and weeds. So yes and no...

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On 6/23/2020 at 8:22 AM, robc22 said:

2 kinds of SW winds around the cape.........Bermuda highs that sit off the continent pumping warm water and sw winds this way. Don't seem to see this nearly as much today as 25 years ago.

 

Local sea breezes........caused by the difference in temps between sea and land.  You could fish offshore all day in FAC conditions then as you headed back to the harbour you could see the wind line about 3 miles off the beach. A mile from port and it would be blowing 20-25 sw.

 

I'm sure rst could explain it much better than me but 40 plus years on boats and ships this is what I have observed.

 

I have caught plenty of fish while it blowing sw lol

As a former avid windsurfer, seeking the SW wind was high priority.

The Cape became famous for its SW windsurfing winds when MIT grads setup the "Wind Hot Line" with private reporting stations networked from a lot of Cape's popular beaches.

If you wanted to know exactly how much wind was happening, or could expect to build, this phone feature was most reliable to get out out of the office strategically.

 

As a result of collecting years of data, the Cape became a windsurf destination for the SW'erlies. This included Buzzards Bay and Nantucket Sound.

The data also showed the Cape region was one of the windiest locations in Summer for the entire US east coast.

That was back when the Bermuda High was firmly in place, for many years consistently. 

The thermals which normally occur for 'sea breezes' on a hot Summer day played a role as well, adding to the overall  SW strengths.

 

Over the last 20 years, the stationary Summer Bermuda High has fallen apart, and could be a direct result of Global Warming, and sea temperature changes.

The SW does not blow like it used to, and now are mostly due to frontal boundaries along with local thermals. But every once in a while the BH does settle in briefly!

 

The guys from MIT and the Wind Hot Line have decided to expand their clients, and now offer one of the best wind reporting on-line systems called "Fish Weather"

Its a free website and phone app., with all of the original private reporting stations , but now combined with all of the public buoy and airport stations operated by NOAA.

There are still pay-features which gives more updated data and history, but I get enough data reported  from all the public stations.

Its my GO-TO app for every boating & fishing excursion!

 

 

 

 

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On 6/22/2020 at 9:02 PM, Kones1 said:

I always believed what I was taught by people I believed knew what it took and they swore at the sou’westers. Sower winds. Those old timers knew a thing or two   No electronics back then. Radio and loran. 

Radio and loran are not electronics?

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2 hours ago, FishRatz said:

As a former avid windsurfer, seeking the SW wind was high priority.

The Cape became famous for its SW windsurfing winds when MIT grads setup the "Wind Hot Line" with private reporting stations networked from a lot of Cape's popular beaches.

If you wanted to know exactly how much wind was happening, or could expect to build, this phone feature was most reliable to get out out of the office strategically.

 

As a result of collecting years of data, the Cape became a windsurf destination for the SW'erlies. This included Buzzards Bay and Nantucket Sound.

The data also showed the Cape region was one of the windiest locations in Summer for the entire US east coast.

That was back when the Bermuda High was firmly in place, for many years consistently. 

The thermals which normally occur for 'sea breezes' on a hot Summer day played a role as well, adding to the overall  SW strengths.

 

Over the last 20 years, the stationary Summer Bermuda High has fallen apart, and could be a direct result of Global Warming, and sea temperature changes.

The SW does not blow like it used to, and now are mostly due to frontal boundaries along with local thermals. But every once in a while the BH does settle in briefly!

 

The guys from MIT and the Wind Hot Line have decided to expand their clients, and now offer one of the best wind reporting on-line systems called "Fish Weather"

Its a free website and phone app., with all of the original private reporting stations , but now combined with all of the public buoy and airport stations operated by NOAA.

There are still pay-features which gives more updated data and history, but I get enough data reported  from all the public stations.

Its my GO-TO app for every boating & fishing excursion!

 

 

 

 

thanks........:)

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On 6/23/2020 at 1:31 PM, Corpslave said:

Daignaults books always mentioned souwest winds.

You could probably count on your fingers the number of times that Daignault fished the Canal in his entire life. That applied to P-town. SW right in your face, and the fish would be almost at your feet. You didn't have to make a Canal cast to reach them. ;) 

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On 6/23/2020 at 3:24 AM, foxfai said:

Would you still fish South side of cape or North of cape side because of this? Why?

 

I've always had bad luck catching ANYTHING when it's blowing SW. Never see it blow this long.

South side, outside of the highway bridges (ie, east of the Sag, west of the Bourne). On the S-bends between the Bourne and Sagamore, SW is a crosswind on both sides.

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2 mins ago, Ditch Jigger said:

You could probably count on your fingers the number of times that Daignault fished the Canal in his entire life. ...

 

I saw Frank and his wife down at Pips years and years ago.  Just a few guys were fishing at the time.

 

He just caught a decent fish and had his wife snap a photo of him holding the fish with both hands.

 

Then, he takes off his jacket, and has his wife take another photo, this time with him holding the fish with one hand and from different angle with a different background.

 

:dismay:.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Joe G said:

 

I saw Frank and his wife down at Pips years and years ago.  Just a few guys were fishing at the time.

 

He just caught a decent fish and had his wife snap a photo of him holding the fish with both hands.

 

Then, he takes off his jacket, and has his wife take another photo, this time with him holding the fish with one hand and from different angle with a different background.

 

:dismay:.

 

 

Glad I wasn’t walking my dog that day :)

Edited by ged

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