pogie_boy

Almost had to swim

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So it happened to me over the weekend.    

 

Wanted to fish a sandbar not far at all from shore in CCB.   I thought I had traced my path out successfully and knew my escape path and when I should start back. 

 

I was wrong.

 

There was a trough, just about a foot deep at the time I'm sure, just before shore.  Probably only 10 yards long.  Well as the tide came in I backed up bit by bit and figured it was time to head back to shore, you know, just in case there's a hole that's a little deeper I don't want to get wet!

 

Well as I waded back towards my landmark I got that "where am I?" feeling when a hole appeared in front of me and I couldn't see the bottom.  So I walked a bit to the left... nope!  walked a bit to the right... Nope!     So I called to my buddy and told him "I don't think I can get out of here without getting wet!"    He and another gentleman fishing nearby tried to see if there was a way  around, but there didn't seem to be.   

 

On my tip-toes the water was up to my armpits. I had my rod in one hand and my keys and phone in the other walking with my hands over my head.    If I had waited another 30 minutes, that water would have probably been over my head.  Feeling the air coming out from underneath my wading belt up my back was an added gift.  It was no more than 30 feet, probably less.  I'm just glad I'm not dumber than I am and didn't wade out to the next bar like I wanted to.

 

The one positive takeaway is I got to test out at least bobbing in waders, but didn't have to test out swimming in waders.

 

We got skunked anyhow.

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It’s happens. If current is present then extra safety needs to be considered.

A nice tight wading belt and not panic attitude will always get you out. 


It was hot at block and I didn’t feel like wetsuiting and went out on the rocks anyway. Plenty of waves knocked me down and I bobbed and swam back each time. Once the fear is lost and confidence gained you can go more places.
 

Don’t let confidence over rule safety. Know your own limitations.

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You guys go those incredible tides up there...ours is a max of 6' and usually more like 5'...a spot that is ankle deep on the way out will only be about waist high if you come back mid tide here. Up there, half a tide can easily be over your head :b:  Glad to hear you got outta there safely...

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Why not were a PFD next time you decide to go wading over your head?

:point:

Edited by flylikabird

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Just now, flylikabird said:

Why not were a PFD next time you decide to go wading over your head?

:point:

We actualy discussed maybe keeping a kiddie pool inner tube in a pouch or pocket of my waders.   
That's all that would have been needed to get me out dry!

 

... but then I'm also trolling for GWS!

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Yeah, I've taken a couple of dunks close to shore, and the initial feeling is "What the *#@%" but once I realized that I was only going to get a little wet I was able to continue on.

 

Once I was fishing the east end during a season where the sand had been moved around a lot by storms, and was fishing on a sand bar. When I started heading back I remembered that I had passed through a couple of troughs, and now these "holes" were just a bit deeper than I was expecting. I, also, did the "tip-toe" quick step, with water just cresting my wader tops.

All I got was a damp shirt and a story to tell.

 

My favorite "get wet" story was during a late summer eve trip to the east end. Plenty of anglers and fish to be had.

As I was fishing I noticed a cargo ship entering from CCB, and as it passed me I hooked up to a nice fish.

As I was fighting the fish I noticed the draught of the ship pulling water that was waist deep down to ankle deep.

I knew it was going to come back strong, but I didn't know from which direction until I saw the huge wave of water running down the jetty towards me. The wave was roughly 7-9" high from where I was standing, so as it reached me I (while wearing my neoprene waders) I jumped straight up.

The wave hit me, I bobbed for a few seconds and it dropped me almost in the same spot.

While this happened, I still had a fish on, and when I dropped back down I resumed to reel in the fish.

Again, ail I had was a damp shirt. There were plenty of shore-bound anglers scrambling to collect their tackle that got smacked by the wave.

 

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I use waders on the regular fishing a sandbar with a strong current going over it on the outgoing tide. About two weeks ago was fishing my spot, someone started chucking bait, landing their setup what felt like about 20 feet away from my three o'clock, and it was kind of stressing me out. So I decided to cross the small channel that separates the sandbar to the far side, to get myself a little more space, and there is often more fish on that side as well. But I was going a little early, I usually wait until I can tiptoe over, but thought I might have to just take a kick or two before being able to stand again on my tiptoes. Started across and realized I had underestimated how far it really was, and had to start doing a side swim, holding my reel above the water with one hand. I don't have a belt on my waders, started to feel the water trickling in, and thought to myself maybe this wasn't the best idea. Was worried I might not make the sand bar before getting swept out by the current. Kept my cool kept swimming and finally felt some sand under my tiptoes, was able to hustle up far enough to stop the flooding. Realized there was a fair amount of water in the old waders, and shuffled out to a dry spot to empty out. Luckily I had left my cell and keys in the car so I didn't get those wet, but was pretty soaked from my short swim. Need to get myself a belt before I try anymore wader swimming. 

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You guys are crazy. Once I got scared in waders (wth a belt) and I bought a wet suit. 

 

I would absolutly wear wear an inflatable PFD with my wetsuit if necessary. 

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4 mins ago, ged said:

You guys are crazy. Once I got scared in waders (wth a belt) and I bought a wet suit. 

 

I would absolutly wear wear an inflatable PFD with my wetsuit if necessary. 


I'm definitely getting one.    Not that I was scared in waders, It's just getting wet sorta put a DAMPer on my enjoyment of the skunking.

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....and, just remember friends, "it's just a fish",and not worth your life staying even MINUTES later than the tide. It comes in FAST! and you don't want to get caught wading back to shore with water over your waders! A PFD would be your best decision before you head out but , usually because of embarrassment over wearing one, most guys just take a chance even though we all know, if in danger, they will save us and, if we were in danger, we would have prayed that we had worn one! We all know, right? 

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I wear my kayak PFD to a lot of places I fish just because it feel natural to me while I fish.

 

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ccb flats is no place to delay your retreat..tide just comes up with no flow movement...your mind wonders out there...try going out then have the fog come in behind you at night....think compass always.

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glad u r ok.........we may make lite of it but if it happened at nite/fog and you were alone it would be pretty scary.........:(

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I recently read about "The Rule of Twelfths" and I'm glad I did.

 

"During the first hour, the water level rises by 1/12th of the total tidal range. In the second hour, it rises by an additional 2/12ths of the total. During the third and fourth hour, it rises by 3/12ths. Then the increase begins to slow down. In the fifth hour, the water only rises by 2/12ths, and in the sixth hour it rises by 1/12th. The pattern is 1,2,3,3,2,1."

--SailMagazine

https://www.sailmagazine.com/cruising/understanding-the-rule-of-twelfths-for-tide-prediction

 

Applying this, we see that 1/4 of the total tide change occurs in the first two hours.  (1/12 + 2/12 = 3/12 = 1/4)

 

BUT, ONE HALF of the total tide change occurs in the following two hours!  (3/12 + 3/12 = 6/12 = 1/2)

 

A simple example, using figures that most easily illustrate the point, is a high tide of +10' and a low tide of -2' for a total tide range of 12'.  

 

You start out at low tide ("HOUR 0" below) and the depth change/hour --- cumulative depth change look like this:

 

HOUR --- DEPTH CHANGE/HOUR --- CUM. DEPTH CHANGE

0 --- 0 --- 0

1 --- 1' --- 1'

2 --- 2' --- 3'

3 --- 3' --- 6'

4 --- 3' --- 9'

5 --- 2' --- 11'

6 --- 1' --- 12'

 

HTH

 

 

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