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Lions Mane Jellyfish

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22 hours ago, MakoMike said:

Under 40 degree water? What about all the cold stunned turtles that turn up on our beaches every fall?

The cold-stunned turtles that show up on the beaches of the Cape are usually Ridley Sea Turtles or sometimes Loggerhead Turtles. The Leatherback is actually considered to be endothermic in that the core of it's body can be 15-20 degrees warmer than the surrounding water. It has been the one reptile some consider "warm blooded". Leatherbacks also feed almost entirely on jellyfish.

 

The Ridley Sea Turtles that get stranded are due to them following the Gulf Stream north and stay too long in Gulf of Maine. When the temp of the water in the Gulf drops quickly in the late Fall, these turtles will get pushed into CCB and then do not have the strength to swim out, and often get beached after a strong NorEastern blow.

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20 hours ago, MakoMike said:

Not according to NOAA. Check out this page turtle rescue efforts

That article doesn't really talk about the species that are typically found cold stunned ... it just listed the 4 species of sea turtles that visit the area during the summer.

 

This is from Mass Audubon

Leatherback 

The largest turtle species and heaviest reptile in the world. It is also the only sea turtle that can regulate its body temperature internally, unlike most reptiles that rely on their external environment for warmth. As such, leatherbacks do not cold-stun, but unfortunately can be killed by boat strikes, fishing gear entanglement, and ingestion of plastic. Adult leatherbacks can reach up to eight feet long and weigh 1,500 pounds!

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1 hour ago, jeffreyrichard said:

That article doesn't really talk about the species that are typically found cold stunned ... it just listed the 4 species of sea turtles that visit the area during the summer.

 

This is from Mass Audubon

Leatherback 

The largest turtle species and heaviest reptile in the world. It is also the only sea turtle that can regulate its body temperature internally, unlike most reptiles that rely on their external environment for warmth. As such, leatherbacks do not cold-stun, but unfortunately can be killed by boat strikes, fishing gear entanglement, and ingestion of plastic. Adult leatherbacks can reach up to eight feet long and weigh 1,500 pounds!

Interesting! I knew they were the biggest, I've seen some in the water that had to be pushing a ton. But I never knew about their ability to regulate their temperature. Thanks for the lesson.

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7 hours ago, jeffreyrichard said:

That article doesn't really talk about the species that are typically found cold stunned ... it just listed the 4 species of sea turtles that visit the area during the summer.

 

This is from Mass Audubon

Leatherback 

The largest turtle species and heaviest reptile in the world. It is also the only sea turtle that can regulate its body temperature internally, unlike most reptiles that rely on their external environment for warmth. As such, leatherbacks do not cold-stun, but unfortunately can be killed by boat strikes, fishing gear entanglement, and ingestion of plastic. Adult leatherbacks can reach up to eight feet long and weigh 1,500 pounds!

They can go bigger than 1500

I’m pretty sure one over 2000 lbs was caught.

 

”Voyage of the turtle” is a great book. Worth a read. 

Edited by west tide

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38 mins ago, BrianBM said:

The heaviest reptile? Bigger than a salty crocodile? Must check.

 

I think the biggest saltwater crocs push over 2000 lbs.

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