vinnyb

UV resin durability issue

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Hi all - figured I’d post this here since you guys have the most experience with this stuff. I’ve been using Loon UV resin (flow) to finish the heads on my dressed siwash hooks lately - mainly due to speed of curing. But I have noticed issues with durability - the stuff just doesn’t seem to hold up. Anyone else having this issue? The pic below is after one outing & an encounter with a cocktail blue. 
 

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I haven't had any issues but the only thing that I've caught with teeth in the last year has been chain pickerel.  Blues have better teeth.  I've had blues do a number on epoxy flies.  I don't know whether a thicker coat on the threads would help or maybe a longer shank hook.  The flies below had an epoxy coat over some flex tubing.  A bunch of snapper blues did the damage.

 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Thanks for the reply Philly. Do you find the finish to be hard? The loon resin feels hard after curing but I can literally take my thumb nail & with moderate force I’m able to split & break the finish. I’m using a good UV light as well - the Loon brand. 

Edited by vinnyb

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Try using the loon (thin) resin. You shouldn’t need too much. I like to let the sunlight cure it thoroughly after zapping it with my bench light. Makes it very durable.

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2 hours ago, Mike Oliver said:

Try Bug Bond

 

mike

Thx Mike - assuming this is more durable than loon flow?

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1 hour ago, FPhaney said:

Try using the loon (thin) resin. You shouldn’t need too much. I like to let the sunlight cure it thoroughly after zapping it with my bench light. Makes it very durable.

I think I have some thin so I’ll give it a shot. The things I like about the flow version are its ability to penetrate the tread & the fact that it doesn’t cure tacky. 

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If you need to make these more indestructible (blues are savages though) then you may want to use zap a gap  on the thread wraps.  You want the super glue to wick into the threads but not run into the buck tail so just a drop at a time or brush on the thread before winding the last dozen wraps. If you have a rotisserie I'd go with top coat of 30 minute epoxy even though it is old school. Stripers show more respect for gear.

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I don't feel any of the UV's penitrate as well as epoxy. Coating the tie with 5sec product before applying the UV will help.

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1 hour ago, JohnDe said:

If you need to make these more indestructible (blues are savages though) then you may want to use zap a gap  on the thread wraps.  You want the super glue to wick into the threads but not run into the buck tail

Yup - this is how I did it before I started using UV resin & with good results. The thin zap a gap penetrates the tread & creates a hard, waterproof head. The downside is cure time but I may have to go back to this method. 

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1 hour ago, XBMX said:

I don't feel any of the UV's penitrate as well as epoxy. Coating the tie with 5sec product before applying the UV will help.

I always felt that epoxy, with its inherent thickness, doesn’t penetrate but does create a superior hard finish. The obvious downside is cure time. 

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We all expect to much from UV's. Multiple layers each cured separately would probably turn out a superior product. 

 

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Don’t know if anyone else does this, I coat thread with nail polish. Soaks in and gets hard. It also give you color if wanted. Then I use epoxy to coat head and dry, slowly. Unfortunately you have to let it harden

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