dlaurend

Hauling too early

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Been trying to practice double hauling and find way too often I’m hauling way to early on my back cast.  Now I know the easy answer is wait longer before I haul but for some reason I can’t train myself to do that.  Any suggestions on how to delay my haul on my back cast will be appreciated. 

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No - just keep your line-hand glued to your reel until rod tip passes vertical.

Are you sure you're not hauling too early on forward cast also?

Are you drifting forward instead of back at end of backcast?

Herb

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Thank You.  I'll try that.  I usually don't .  For some reason I'm able to delay on the forward cast.  I don't believe I'm drifting forward on the back cast.  (I'll check next practice session )

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You might try leaving your hauling hand stationary on your backcast - it will naturally pull some line as your reel and rod come back.  You'll feel the line pull at your haul hand - that's when to haul.

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I have just returned from a casting lesson with Jim Fearn a world class caster and teacher. I thought I could haul and I can in terms of getting the job done. But I found there is a world of difference between hauling Ok and doing it technically correctly. With the haul there also needs to be a straight line rod path and accurate tracking. The line also has to go over the top of the rod tip. That’s easy on an over head but a side cast not easy at all.

I am back to base zero.

You starting creeping and hauling hard then look forward to tailing loops.

Honestly trying to learn how to cast by the written word is almost Impossible.

Invest a few bob in some lessons and you will never regret it.

 

mike

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It’s important to begin your back or forward casts just as your loop unrolls completely. If you begin your cast before this, some of your stroke is wasted while the line continues to unroll, depleting energy in the line. With proper timing and mechanics, you’ll be shooting 80-90 feet of line without much effort or hauling. 

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14 hours ago, Seadogg said:

 With proper timing and mechanics, you’ll be shooting 80-90 feet of line without much effort or hauling. 

To be clear, I think you mean "casting" 80-90' of line.......not shooting that much.  

 

 

 

 

 

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6 mins ago, numbskull said:

To be clear, I think you mean "casting" 80-90' of line.......not shooting that much.  

 

 

 

 

 

Right. 

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Read George Roberts' three part series in Tail magazine about distance casting in saltwater.  Hauling is necessary at times, but is overrated.  Straight line path, longer casting arc, shooting a little line on the back cast and most importantly a hard stop will get you 70 to 80 feet without a haul.  His lessons begin with a long belly floating line, with 40 feet out of the rod tip and no hauling.  I've taken a lesson with him and it made a huge difference in my single hand rod casting.

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Most  guys are going to struggle to put 40 feet of line into the air thanks to the popularity of these over weighted short heads of 30 feet.

I don’t think a well timed haul is over rated at all. It is an intrinsic part of salt water fly fishing. It is immensely useful when the casting arms tires towards the end of a session. On the days you need max range you won’t get there without a decent double haul.

It is very helpful to in keeping a lot of line in the air especially long belly lines which happen to be my favourite lines.

 

Why make life harder than it need be.

 

mike

 

 

 

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Wish I could help but can't offer much written advice.Purpose of hauling is to load rod tip even further and increase line speed but it must be timed correctly so the extra pull comes just as rod tip stops. Too soon and the extra bend you put in the tip unloads before the stop, causing tailing loops on a backcast and slack line forward cast which leads to line piling up instead of turning over. Much has been written about proper hauling techniques but it's difficult to learn from print. Practice or some hands on critique from a good caster is the only way to master it. Proper haul is a must learn technique for a saltwater flyrodder, the ability to carry 40ft of line and a good size fly in the wind is sometimes very critical to a successful day on the water.

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Why not take a casting lesson ? Your local flyshop should put you on to the instructor or perhaps they offer them. It will be money well spent. FishHawk

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I took lessons last fall.   Helped a lot.  Practiced some after but not a lot.   Now practicing a lot and making sure I’m doing it right.  

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I just "bumped" a hauling discussion to the top of Fly Fishing that took place in 2010 amoung some very good casters - very technical but worth a read.

Herb

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Herb,

 

Thanks for the input.  That 2010 discussion is indeed very good, especially for experienced single hand casters.  My very brief summary of the Roberts' method above, which George goes into in much greater detail in his Tail magazine series than my blurb does it justice, is probably a better starting point for the less experienced.  Without a good foundation and understanding the basic building blocks of the cast, a haul won't add much in terms of either distance or line speed.  That's all I was trying to say.  What I learned from George in a nutshell is that the line hand can help reduce some of the work that the rod hand does and with proper timing can add both line speed and distance, after the fundamentals of loading and unloading the rod are well learned.  But...and the experienced casters should take this with a grain of salt...far too much emphasis is placed on hauling, to the point that it can become a crutch for poor technique.

 

Mark

Edited by 02807Fish

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