MaxKatt

Bikes for fly fisherman

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34 mins ago, saulean said:

Tubeless vs tubed tires. 

Oh, i get that, but in the sense that you were talking about food, not any type of food i have ever eaten. 

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31 mins ago, ridenfish said:

Lol.  
 

When I had a steel Independent Fabrication I bought frame fogger and treated it. There are little holes left over to let the gases out when they weld and you stick the tube in and fill the frame.  It’s a good idea if you’re fattie is steel. 

Actually, I had the bike upgraded at the LBS where I had shifters, bars, grips and lower hub replaced and had him fog the frame. I sorta forgot about that - out of sight, out of mind...

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I've been rigging up bicycles for fly fishing, surf casting & exploring hard to get to spots for years. Since the seventies. it always made sense because I kind of lived in a rural area growing up in Roscoe New York. 

 

We spent most of our summers out at Montauk or block Island back in those days and without a bike it was a lot harder to get wherever you wanted to go.

 

That still holds true today.

 

 

Get yourself a nice rack and a couple of baskets and there's just about nothing you can't do. My favorite fishing bikes really are nice, simple three speed beach cruisers. 

 

 

In the photo below I think I had rigged this up for the Cape Cod Canal one year but a lot of the time I would ride that bike without the front basket on it and I would just set up a stripping basket on the back of the bike or a milk crate. Beach cruisers are so easy to ride and so pleasurable to cruise around down that they're hard to beat. Obviously they don't cut it on sand but they'll generally get you where you want to go and most of the time when I'm out on sand I don't mind walking. 5ee23ab769e2b_FishingCruiserBike.jpg.eef737d671fe17bf1bd06aab3113b07c.jpg

 

Of course if I have to pedal 10 mi or something and get to a remote spot because blue fish are hammering small peanut bunker then, we go ahead and break out the fatty.

 

I custom built a Moonlander frame because at the time it was the only frame that would handle a 5-in tire. The photo below is a tubeless all-terrain tire setup which I ended up ditching in favor of a sand tire configuration which is markedly better on sand. 

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I found the knobby all terrain tires to be crappy in sand & especially terrible if you're riding all day and covering any kind of distance.Even Rhode island's sand which is pictured below is not that easy to ride on with those knobby tires. There's a reason most beach buggies use beach tires. Same concept applies to bicycles. In that photo below I was struggling and couldn't really ride very fast or smoothly even with the 5-in tires. You can always take more air out but then it gets harder and harder to pedal so the trade off is the effort factor goes way up. You have to carry a lot of water also which is a big problem when you're out on a remote beach. Water can weigh you down.

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what's nice about the all-terrain tire however is that it'll get you through the forest very nicely and in spots where you really don't have a ton of sand it makes sense to run the all-terrain tire. With fly fishing you really don't carry a ton of gear it's mainly just water you're stripping basket a nice assortment of flies and potentially waders..etc. 

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I use the bike up in the Catskills a lot and the knobby tires are awesome for that environment. I'd also recommend a frame bag they are incredibly good uses of space. My frame bags are usually filled with all kinds of needed things like pumps, water purification devices nalgene bottles, Plano boxes, surly gear straps..etc.

 

Having a good rack is also very important because you want the rack locked to the hitch mount and you want the bikes locked to the rack. This lets you stop off for a nice lobster roll or what not without having to worry. 1up USA racks are about 10 million times better than the garbage Thule puts out. In the particular rack below I added their fat tire bike spacer kit and those are 5-in moonlander tires fitting right through them very easily on the back of the rack closest to the vehicle. The tires on the cheap trek fatty are four and a half inches. 

 

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You can do whatever you want with a bicycle and your imagination is the limit. One year I showed up at the canal with a Coleman road trip grill pop up camping chairs a yeti cooler and I even installed a commercial laundry basket on a small flatbed trailer which I wound up upgrading to a model twice as long as the one in the picture below. It was hilarious and I could actually pedal that whole contraption at about 20 mph. Of course you're not getting out on any sand but having a trailer is nice for an all day trip providing the ride is fairly leisurely. 

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Riding on the beach is a great way to stay in shape. It certainly isn't easy especially in fluffy sand that often leads up to the beach. That's where the right tires make all the difference. 

 

Also fat tire bikes generally lack suspension and off the rack they're going to come with tubes in the tires. those types of setups actually are fairly comfortable and they ride pretty nice. When you go tubeless the ride is much worse but you have the advantage of being able to let a lot of air out of the tire and ride as well as you are comfortable doing based on not only your weight but how much gear you have with you. 

 

On some of my upper Delaware River trips I'll have a significant amount of gear on the bike including a tent and a whole little micro cooking setup.

 

Fishing bikes make you rethink a lot of things and generally it's best to try to travel as light as possible. However when you start talking about overnight rides and two or three day expeditions, usually you'll wind up loading your bike right up to capacity. For that reason the steel frames can be an asset. 

 

An exceptionally light carbon fiber fat bike would be very uncomfortable because they are generally not too friendly with racks and oftentimes those little tiny seats can be extremely uncomfortable. 

 

This is what always takes me back to the original 3-speed beach cruiser. For the money you can do a gorgeous beach cruiser & be very happy. The key is to set it up with the right racks and detachable baskets. it's also nice to have a drop in liner that has drainage that way you can throw smaller odds and ends in the baskets and not worry that they're going to bounce out.

 

Believe it or not a simple beach cruiser does a pretty damn good job as a serviceable fishing bike. Disadvantages are they are very heavy and obviously they can't ride on the sand. Also with only three speeds taking any kind of hills becomes even harder but honestly on a 20-speed fat tire bike if you have a significant hill you're going to be pushing it up the hill most likely.

 

That's where the e-bikes are starting to take over and as the prices start coming down on these things, we will be looking to see if there are any models that make sense for a beach situation. The problems are many with e-bikes. Battery weight significantly increases the weight of the bike which decreases your ability to carry gear. The trade-off is the electric power is an absolute lifesaver around hills or to cover long stretches when you're starting to tire and getting thirsty because water supply is low or worse yet you're out of water.

 

 

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9 hours ago, stormy monday said:

I've only just started looking at the bike option, I have a Kona Stinky Six and a long travel hardtail - do you guys run into a lot of corrosion issues with the salt? I was thinking of coating my entire hardtail with Boeshield before attempting to use it like this...

Stormy, yes, there are corrosion issues. A bike should be washed down with a hose after each over-sand ride.  I've never used Boeshield but I wonder if you can get it in all the crevices of the derailleurs, etc. . I bought my bike 2nd had from a bike shop that had it as a rental. I'm sure it was ridden in the surf wash. One day a spoke broke so I took the rim tape off and each spoke end was surrounded by a mound of salt. No wonder one of them broke. Best to stay out of salt water.

 

Mike

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The fat tire rims have gaps where the tube is exposed. This always struck me as weird, giving possibly less protection to the tire. I read about these occasionally and it sounds like punctures to the exposed tube are not a problem. 
However, what about sand? Any fat tire users noticing sand or salt build up inside the outer tire  or between tire and tube?

I understand tubeless tires and run them myself on a Scott CF 29” hardtail. However, I haven’t seen the tubeless tires on a fat tire bike and may not be understanding how the whole setup works. Either way it looks like those gapes in the rim would allow sand, water and debris to enter and possibly wear the tube form the inside, add unwanted weight, etc. 

Can anyone elaborate?

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27 mins ago, FlukeM said:

The fat tire rims have gaps where the tube is exposed. This always struck me as weird, giving possibly less protection to the tire. I read about these occasionally and it sounds like punctures to the exposed tube are not a problem. 
However, what about sand? Any fat tire users noticing sand or salt build up inside the outer tire  or between tire and tube?

I understand tubeless tires and run them myself on a Scott CF 29” hardtail. However, I haven’t seen the tubeless tires on a fat tire bike and may not be understanding how the whole setup works. Either way it looks like those gapes in the rim would allow sand, water and debris to enter and possibly wear the tube form the inside, add unwanted weight, etc. 

Can anyone elaborate?

It’s to cut down the weight on the extra material of the wide rim. If you look at the picture you’ll notice the rim strip bulging out of the rim. So much psi forcing on that tape/strip there isn’t a chance for foreign material. Haven’t had a flat issue due them being exposed. Ride mine frequently in the woods.

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Been riding fatbike tubeless for many years and I never had any issue with debris coming through thoses gaps... the summer use is not on beach but on mountain bike trails..

 

as mentioned, the air pressure on the rim strips makes the whole setup pretty tight..

I would be more concern with salt exposure than debris..

 

Regards
Dc

 

Edited by dcote

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