jjdbike

Vegetable garden: Plants for full sun vs partial?

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I know, all vegetables, greens fruit etc want full sun. Unfortunately only one of my boxes gets full sun all day. One currently gets filtered sun to partial shade in the middle of the day, with full in the morning and afternoon. I presume this will change throught the season. I pick up my plants today and they'll go into the gardens tomorrow (today's gonna be a rainout). My next project, after planting, is thinning some trees and shrubs.

That being said, which of these plants absolutely requires full sun all day and which might tolerate less sun?

From Plant

Big Beef Tomato

Cherry Tomato - Sun Sugary

Kentucky Wonder Pole Bean

Black Wax Pencil Pod Pole Bean

Sweet Yellow Banana Peppers

Jalapeños

Radishes

Sweet basil

Flat leaf Italian Parsley

Dill

Oregano

Thyme

Rosemary

Sage

Cilantro

Cucumber

Yellow Summer Squash

Sugar Baby Water Melon

Red Beets

From Seed

Radishes

Red Leaf Lettuce

Spinach

Kale

Thanks in advance!

JD

 

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Jim - My entire garden gets only perhaps 6-8 hours of sun per day, so no huge deal.

 

Greens can tolerate partial shade, in fact in the dead of summer, shade in the PM is actually better so they don't wilt and/or bolt. Oregano, thyme, rosemary and sage do well in partial shade.

 

The rest that you listed do well in full sun, but as I said can get away with 8 hours per day.

 

As to season, just remember that the sun starts to drop further and further south after June 21.

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Agree with Steve. I planted some herbs (chives, oregano, and sage for my wife in a small area before I built raised beds. It got 4-6 hours a day. These plants have survived 3 winters and come back well every year. So the leafy veggies can take more shade. The plants that want the sun are the tomatoes, cukes, melons,etc that are putting out large fruits. For them the more sun the better as it takes a lot of energy to  grow a large fruit. That said, most of us are not living on a 50 acre farm, we have buildings near us, trees that we can’t or don’t want to cut down and so forth so what I’ve always done is try different things. If it works, bingo! If not, try something different in that spot next year. Good luck and happy gardening! 

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26 mins ago, Steve in Mass said:

Jim - My entire garden gets only perhaps 6-8 hours of sun per day, so no huge deal.

 

Greens can tolerate partial shade, in fact in the dead of summer, shade in the PM is actually better so they don't wilt and/or bolt. Oregano, thyme, rosemary and sage do well in partial shade.

 

The rest that you listed do well in full sun, but as I said can get away with 8 hours per day.

 

As to season, just remember that the sun starts to drop further and further south after June 21.

Thanks a lot Steve. Appreciate it. As soon as I get my lesson plans together for next week, I'm heading out to prune, until the rain comes.

Best Regards.

JD

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1 min ago, Good2Go said:

Agree with Steve. I planted some herbs (chives, oregano, and sage for my wife in a small area before I built raised beds. It got 4-6 hours a day. These plants have survived 3 winters and come back well every year. So the leafy veggies can take more shade. The plants that want the sun are the tomatoes, cukes, melons,etc that are putting out large fruits. For them the more sun the better as it takes a lot of energy to  grow a large fruit. That said, most of us are not living on a 50 acre farm, we have buildings near us, trees that we can’t or don’t want to cut down and so forth so what I’ve always done is try different things. If it works, bingo! If not, try something different in that spot next year. Good luck and happy gardening! 

Thanks!

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1 hour ago, Good2Go said:

Agree with Steve. I planted some herbs (chives, oregano, and sage for my wife in a small area before I built raised beds. It got 4-6 hours a day. These plants have survived 3 winters and come back well every year. So the leafy veggies can take more shade. The plants that want the sun are the tomatoes, cukes, melons,etc that are putting out large fruits. For them the more sun the better as it takes a lot of energy to  grow a large fruit. That said, most of us are not living on a 50 acre farm, we have buildings near us, trees that we can’t or don’t want to cut down and so forth so what I’ve always done is try different things. If it works, bingo! If not, try something different in that spot next year. Good luck and happy gardening! 

 

1 hour ago, Steve in Mass said:

Jim - My entire garden gets only perhaps 6-8 hours of sun per day, so no huge deal.

 

Greens can tolerate partial shade, in fact in the dead of summer, shade in the PM is actually better so they don't wilt and/or bolt. Oregano, thyme, rosemary and sage do well in partial shade.

 

The rest that you listed do well in full sun, but as I said can get away with 8 hours per day.

 

As to season, just remember that the sun starts to drop further and further south after June 21.

 

1 hour ago, Good2Go said:

Agree with Steve. I planted some herbs (chives, oregano, and sage for my wife in a small area before I built raised beds. It got 4-6 hours a day. These plants have survived 3 winters and come back well every year. So the leafy veggies can take more shade. The plants that want the sun are the tomatoes, cukes, melons,etc that are putting out large fruits. For them the more sun the better as it takes a lot of energy to  grow a large fruit. That said, most of us are not living on a 50 acre farm, we have buildings near us, trees that we can’t or don’t want to cut down and so forth so what I’ve always done is try different things. If it works, bingo! If not, try something different in that spot next year. Good luck and happy gardening! 

Okay, sooooooo:

  • Big fruits like tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, zucchini and melons need the most sun.
  • Greens and herbs can deal w/ less sun, especially in summer.
  • Can pole beans deal w/ a little less sun than say tomatoes, peppers, squash and melons?

JD

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Here's what may seem like a strange question.

 

Does anyone know if mounting a mirror on the roof of my pole barn (approx 20 ft. high) to direct the afternoon sun's rays to a shaded area work to provide "sunlight" to growing plants?

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7 mins ago, BARhopper said:

Here's what may seem like a strange question.

 

Does anyone know if mounting a mirror on the roof of my pole barn (approx 20 ft. high) to direct the afternoon sun's rays to a shaded area work to provide "sunlight" to growing plants?

I can feel the heat of sun reflecting into the garden off coated windows so I’m going to guess at least some.  Problem is you need it to track the sun to follow the arc or it will just swept across your plants for a short period each day.  

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1 hour ago, BARhopper said:

Here's what may seem like a strange question.

 

Does anyone know if mounting a mirror on the roof of my pole barn (approx 20 ft. high) to direct the afternoon sun's rays to a shaded area work to provide "sunlight" to growing plants?

Forgive my ignorance as this will be my first pole beans. Your pole bean is 20’ high?

What it is trained onto, a tree?

So you’d need a ladder to harvest?

Am I misunderstanding?

JD

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10 mins ago, jjdbike said:

Forgive my ignorance as this will be my first pole beans. Your pole bean is 20’ high?

What it is trained onto, a tree?

So you’d need a ladder to harvest?

Am I misunderstanding?

JD

Hahaha yep I think you misread.   Pole barn not pole bean!

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9 mins ago, jjdbike said:

Forgive my ignorance as this will be my first pole beans. Your pole bean is 20’ high?

What it is trained onto, a tree?

So you’d need a ladder to harvest?

Am I misunderstanding?

JD

His BARN is 20' high!  Good luck with your beans, I'm waiting for mine to germinate. Rattlesnake heirloom purple spotted beans, been growing em for many years.

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Yes, the pole barn is 20 ft. Lol!

I'd need some seriously magic beans to need a 20 ft. bean pole.

I've got some good size mirrors laying around so I might give it a shot.

Assembling a 10' X 20' greenhouse for my wife this weekend though, so it will have to wait a while. At least until I get some more fishing in.

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Pole beans I grew last year were from some guy Jack.  Poles were 10 feet high and they were growing several feet past the tops. Used a 6ft step ladder to pick.   Cut 3 feet off the damn poles this year. 

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1 hour ago, JimW said:

Pole beans I grew last year were from some guy Jack.  Poles were 10 feet high and they were growing several feet past the tops. Used a 6ft step ladder to pick.   Cut 3 feet off the damn poles this year. 

Grow them one trellis..........Set up two tall stakes as far apart as you need. String just twine every foot or so horizontally between them, Then come back, tie twine to the top string, weave it vertically thru  thru the others, and secure it to the bottom string. do this about very foot. You now have a grid for the pole beans to climb.

 

Plant the seed in double row, spacing perhaps every six inches, At first you may need to train them onto the grid, but after that, they will cover the entire thing.

 

 

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19 mins ago, Steve in Mass said:

Grow them one trellis..........Set up two tall stakes as far apart as you need. String just twine every foot or so horizontally between them, Then come back, tie twine to the top string, weave it vertically thru  thru the others, and secure it to the bottom string. do this about very foot. You now have a grid for the pole beans to climb.

 

Plant the seed in double row, spacing perhaps every six inches, At first you may need to train them onto the grid, but after that, they will cover the entire thing.

 

 

I did that with 3 stakes year before.  Works well.  I think I over fertilized last year.  I have 3 stakes set up and planted for twine again this year but I was thinking of using a sheet of 6 inch concrete mesh.  Have excess bought for cages. I planted a couple hills of honey nut squash in the same bed which I hope wasn’t a mistake but I can kind of contain that with more mesh. Stuffing everything I can into small space backfires occasionally. 

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