Bigfish25

Choosing Kayak Paddles

15 posts in this topic

Posted (edited) · Report post

My wife and I are new to kayaking and just bought a tandem kayak. It is 33 inches maximum width. I have looked about what to buy online but would like some personal suggestions. Since we are in our late sixties it will be recreational with some fly fishing. I am six feet 175 pounds DW is five foot six 130 pounds. Budget is around $140 each. Thank you.

Edited by Bigfish25

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I’m a big fan of aqua bound stingray and manta ray paddles. However I’m hesitant to recommend as I foresee a divorce in the not too distant future for you and the wife.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

There are some sales on paddles at a certain store in Austin Texas. Go with something as light as the budget will allow. They had Accent Hero's on the Water adjustable paddles for $100.

 

You might find some good light paddles used. If you want new, go name brand with less weight around 240-250cm long. 

Edited by Spazzoni

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Posted (edited) · Report post

10 hours ago, connman said:

I’m a big fan of aqua bound stingray and manta ray paddles. However I’m hesitant to recommend as I foresee a divorce in the not too distant future for you and the wife.

I think we'll be ok but you never know! :)

Edited by Bigfish25
changed my mind

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I think that was an attempt at humor. Tandem kayaks are known as divorce boats ? Sometimes

you end up paddling while your partner is enjoying the scenery. Most kayak sales people

recommend single person kayaks to avoid the conflict. This way you can each paddle

at your own pace and go in what ever direction you desire.  People say the same thing

about tandem bikes ? How do you decide who gets to ride in the front ?  Good luck with your new ride.

After 40 years  of married life I am sure you know more then most when it comes to relationships.

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Any paddle over 36 ozs starts to feel heavy for me. Aqua bound makes tough paddles, many outfitters use them. I have the aluminum handled model, its fairly lightweight, the fibreglass version is 6 ozs lighter. You never got back to us when you were looking for a kayak, which tandem did you get? 

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Cheech:

"You never got back to us when you were looking for a kayak, which tandem did you get?"

I apologize for not posting my choice.  We bought a Hurricane Skimmer 140 tandem. I like the weight 65lbs. and also was told it was very stable another plus.

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You need a blade that moves a lot of water. This will help you on size. 
 

 

859F25B7-AE8A-467B-8D7C-6784DE5FE0E0.jpeg

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Longer will be easier on your shoulders, go too short and you'll be in a high angle position which is a bit more taxing. You will want to check out 240 and 250 length paddles.

 

If I were you, I would get your wife the lightest paddle your budget will allow. 

 

The manta ray carbon would be worth looking at.

 

Lighter for her means more time on the water for you.

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Bigfish , yeh paddling inside joke about tandem kayaks . The last time I paddled In same boat with wife was 1987. After that I only ever tandem kayaked with my kids. 
Assuming  you are new to kayaking , you need two different length paddles for you and wife . A 220-230 probably for wife and 230-240 for you . You will be moving a lot of weight and a big boat and probably one person propelling kayak at times so a power blade/ higher angle style paddle like the Manta Ray blade style should work better than the longer touring/low angle blade like the Sting Ray. 
Have you given any thought to single person kayaks . The tandem is going to be a bear for your wife to lift onto a car top unless you have a trailer or live on the water. The tandem is going to be a tough paddle for you if padding alone for fishing. And wife is not going to enjoy a fly in the back of her head much either. If she fly fishes too great but I know my wife doesn’t like to sit in her kayak waiting on me when I fish from mine. I don’t fish when I kayak with her anymore, I go solo if I want to fish. I’m only married 33 years but getting the hang of it.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Congrats on getting a nice light tandem which weighs less then most guys single yaks. Check out Bending Branches, and Werner websites they all  have paddle selectors. Bending Branches is Aqua Bound, I have several Bending branches paddles , tough paddles very light . I started out in a tandem 16’ Wilderness Pamlico a long time ago, heavy yak, I paddled  wife around a lot and we also paddled together, I’ve always been a low angle paddler, never had a problem.  Most selectors recommend 240 for your wife and 240-250 for you .Do some website research on how to paddle and Paddles, get the lightest you can get, push the budget a bit if needed, you can get pretty light for reasonable  money but spend a lot more for just a little bit less weight.

Jack and Pat married 39 years and she is still my best friend!

Edited by Bulldog
Clarification!

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I missed your post about what kayak you bought , never mine most of what I said. Looked up your kayak , looks like a good choice. Personally I use low angle paddle most myself. For low angle you would need longer than I suggested above .

Edited by connman

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I would suggest to try a few paddles. Go to a shop that will let you try a variety of weights and lengths. The angle that you prefer to paddle plus the width of the boat will determine the length of the shaft and the size of the blade. High angle wide blade shorter shaft, low angle longer shaft thinner blade. It has been my experience that in wide tandem boats low angle works well and is less fatiguing, but is an individual choice. Years of paddling and instruction have taught me that light weight is very important. Go as light as your wallet will allow. Werner make a wide variety of paddles they are pricey but worth it. They have a wide variety  of blades  and shafts. Good luck and enjoy the voyage.

 

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