flyangler

The CDC should be forced to focus on Disease Control and Prevention....

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....not bicycle safety, gender neutral bathrooms, grant money to China, agriculture, fat lesbians, drunk monkeys, curing the "gun disease" and all the other crap which does not threaten society writ large. 

So who thinks the CDC could be given less money, forced to focus on what matters and still be crappy? 

 

USAToday:

 

White House aide says CDC ‘let the country down.’:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention “really did set us back” in the early stages of the coronavirus outbreak by keeping testing within the bureaucracy and providing a faulty test, White House adviser Peter Navarro said Sunday.

 

“The CDC, which really had the most trusted brand around the world in this space, really let the country down,” Navarro, the national Defense Production Act policy coordinator, told NBC’s Meet the Press.

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Just as a reminder, the issues and problems at the CDC are not new. 
 

 

The Atlantic, 2018 

 

Is the CDC Losing Control?

The country’s flagship public-health agency is facing internal scandal and funding issues that will test its ability to respond to outbreaks on the horizon.

VANN R. NEWKIRK II

FEBRUARY 3, 2018

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was created, quite literally, to drain the swamp. In the not-so-far-off past, much of the southeastern United States was a malarial mess, with disease-carrying mosquitoes multiplying in the heat and moisture of the agricultural lowlands and wetlands that dominate the region. Before America became a superpower, the major threats to life and liberty weren’t terrorism or nuclear annihilation, but the annual scourge of fever diseases. When the CDC’s predecessor, the Office of Malaria Control in War Areas, was created in 1942, its mission was to knock down the remaining barriers to personal freedom these illnesses imposed. Or, to drain them.

 

Seventy-five years later, malaria and yellow fever have been all but eliminated in the continental United States. The morbidity and mortality burden for the worst infectious diseases has fallen tremendously over the last century, and average life expectancy has increased by over 10 years since 1942. At the center of it all is the CDC, now a major piece of both the public-health and national-security apparatuses, and a relative constant in times of great change. But as 2017 showed, few institutions are truly immune to the political upheaval the Trump administration brought to Washington—and now the stalwart CDC finds itself sinking into the swamp.

 

To say the agency has taken a step back in Trump’s first year would be an understatement. On Wednesday, the new secretary of Health and Human Services, Alex Azar, announced the resignation of CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald, citing “complex financial interests that have imposed a broad recusal limiting her ability to complete all her duties.” According to a recent report from Politico, some of those holdings included eyebrow-raising investments in companies directly related to Fitzgerald’s work, including thousands of dollars in drug and insurance companies.


Close ties with these industries aren’t unusual among Trump administration officials: Former Health Secretary Tom Price had stock in biotech and pharmaceuticals companies, and Azar is a former executive with pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly. But Fitzgerald’s financial activity went even beyond this new norm. Politico reported that she’d held stock in tobacco companies Reynolds American, British American Tobacco, Imperial Brands, Philip Morris International, and Altria Group before she took office in July. As director, she purchased over $1,000 worth of stock in Japan Tobacco. That means that before she dumped the stocks in October, Fitzgerald held ownership in four of the “Big Five” tobacco companies in the world....

 

W

hat’s more, facing a loss of funding for its international infectious-disease efforts—there appear to be “no new resources” on the horizon—the agency is set to cut back its global health-security program by as much as 80 percent. In a hotter, more connected world, when global pandemic seems all the more likely, the CDC is shrinking from the world.

 

Paradoxically, the failure of global diseases like Ebola and Zika to establish beachheads in the United States after sustained panics has often been used as rationale for pulling the agency back and slashing its proactive public-health funds. But renewed austerity, along with controversy in leadership, could set the CDC up for failure precisely at the moment when it is needed most.

 

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17 mins ago, tomkaz said:

Just as a reminder, the issues and problems at the CDC are not new. 
 

 

The Atlantic, 2018 

 

Is the CDC Losing Control?

The country’s flagship public-health agency is facing internal scandal and funding issues that will test its ability to respond to outbreaks on the horizon.

VANN R. NEWKIRK II

FEBRUARY 3, 2018

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was created, quite literally, to drain the swamp. In the not-so-far-off past, much of the southeastern United States was a malarial mess, with disease-carrying mosquitoes multiplying in the heat and moisture of the agricultural lowlands and wetlands that dominate the region. Before America became a superpower, the major threats to life and liberty weren’t terrorism or nuclear annihilation, but the annual scourge of fever diseases. When the CDC’s predecessor, the Office of Malaria Control in War Areas, was created in 1942, its mission was to knock down the remaining barriers to personal freedom these illnesses imposed. Or, to drain them.

 

Seventy-five years later, malaria and yellow fever have been all but eliminated in the continental United States. The morbidity and mortality burden for the worst infectious diseases has fallen tremendously over the last century, and average life expectancy has increased by over 10 years since 1942. At the center of it all is the CDC, now a major piece of both the public-health and national-security apparatuses, and a relative constant in times of great change. But as 2017 showed, few institutions are truly immune to the political upheaval the Trump administration brought to Washington—and now the stalwart CDC finds itself sinking into the swamp.

 

To say the agency has taken a step back in Trump’s first year would be an understatement. On Wednesday, the new secretary of Health and Human Services, Alex Azar, announced the resignation of CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald, citing “complex financial interests that have imposed a broad recusal limiting her ability to complete all her duties.” According to a recent report from Politico, some of those holdings included eyebrow-raising investments in companies directly related to Fitzgerald’s work, including thousands of dollars in drug and insurance companies.


Close ties with these industries aren’t unusual among Trump administration officials: Former Health Secretary Tom Price had stock in biotech and pharmaceuticals companies, and Azar is a former executive with pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly. But Fitzgerald’s financial activity went even beyond this new norm. Politico reported that she’d held stock in tobacco companies Reynolds American, British American Tobacco, Imperial Brands, Philip Morris International, and Altria Group before she took office in July. As director, she purchased over $1,000 worth of stock in Japan Tobacco. That means that before she dumped the stocks in October, Fitzgerald held ownership in four of the “Big Five” tobacco companies in the world....

 

W

hat’s more, facing a loss of funding for its international infectious-disease efforts—there appear to be “no new resources” on the horizon—the agency is set to cut back its global health-security program by as much as 80 percent. In a hotter, more connected world, when global pandemic seems all the more likely, the CDC is shrinking from the world.

 

Paradoxically, the failure of global diseases like Ebola and Zika to establish beachheads in the United States after sustained panics has often been used as rationale for pulling the agency back and slashing its proactive public-health funds. But renewed austerity, along with controversy in leadership, could set the CDC up for failure precisely at the moment when it is needed most.

 

Azar...Fitzgerald...Price...those were all Trump appointees. lol

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58 mins ago, patchyfog said:

Azar...Fitzgerald...Price...those were all Trump appointees. lol

The policies and distractions predate any of these people - they go back to Tom Friedan who was nominated by Obama and finally confirmed in June 2009 and stayed until he walked out of his office when Obama left the WH in January 2017. Friedan spent eight years in charge of CDC and is mainly responsible for the mission creep, mandate expansion and inefficiency that existed when he left three years ago. 

 

Price deserved to be fired for his spending abuses and I think I argued for that somewhere here before he resigned. 

 

Fitzgerald, shortest-lived CDC head in history and had no impact whatsoever on the waste and distractions I mentioned. 

 

You are suggesting that somehow the CDC went from world-class disease controlling and preventing agency in January 2017 to the confused, distracted and incompetent agency it is today in that short period of time? 

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2 hours ago, tomkaz said:

....not bicycle safety, gender neutral bathrooms, grant money to China, agriculture, fat lesbians, drunk monkeys, curing the "gun disease" and all the other crap which does not threaten society writ large. 

So who thinks the CDC could be given less money, forced to focus on what matters and still be crappy? 

 

USAToday:

 

White House aide says CDC ‘let the country down.’:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention “really did set us back” in the early stages of the coronavirus outbreak by keeping testing within the bureaucracy and providing a faulty test, White House adviser Peter Navarro said Sunday.

 

“The CDC, which really had the most trusted brand around the world in this space, really let the country down,” Navarro, the national Defense Production Act policy coordinator, told NBC’s Meet the Press.

That would be like saying that democrats should try to be honest, at least 2% of the time...

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3 mins ago, Stonesipher said:

 What’s the sense, if they came up with some facts or action plans and Trump doesn’t like him he’ll just fire them.

And if Trump stutters, you want him fired...

Democrat is a brain disease.

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