Drew C.

Perdigons

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Bought a few to see if they work, the ones I have are a tad heavy - almost like dropping 

a depth charge in the stream.

Gonna let them swim tomorrow.

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I use them pretty often on the dropper of a euro rig. Quilldigon is my favorite so far. Provides a good contrast to attractors or stone flies as it suggests a small mayfly or maybe a midge.

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On 5/16/2020 at 9:59 AM, Marcel_Karssies said:

Bought a few to see if they work, the ones I have are a tad heavy - almost like dropping 

a depth charge in the stream.

Gonna let them swim tomorrow.

Perdigons are traditionally tied heavy. The body of the fly is tied very thin with either thread or tinsel, and with the addition of a tungsten bead, they sink like rocks. They make great anchor flies, but like everything else, they have their time and places. They work great in fast water, and deep pockets where you have a very short drift and need to get a fly down there quick. 

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The water I fish does not flow that fast but the pools that hold fish are short and relatively deep. I watched the perdigon go down rapidly so more time for any fish to intercept it.

Time to reserve some space for them in my fly box.

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Interesting that they are considered heavy. Other nymphs are tied with 3 mm tungsten beads and yet don’t get the same label of heavy.

If 3 and 4mm beads are good for fast deep water no reason to think that with a smaller bead they won’t work in shallower and less fast water.

Mike

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Posted (edited) · Report post

23 hours ago, Mike Oliver said:

Interesting that they are considered heavy. Other nymphs are tied with 3 mm tungsten beads and yet don’t get the same label of heavy.

If 3 and 4mm beads are good for fast deep water no reason to think that with a smaller bead they won’t work in shallower and less fast water.

Mike

It’s not that perdigons are “heavy”. They are tied with a slim thread or tinsel body, which makes them very streamline. They’re is no hair or other loose material on them to create any drag in the water. This is why they sink and hold near the bottom so we’ll. Perdigons can be tied in numerous weights. Some with a 2.0mm bead, and some the same size with a 3.5mm bead. You can also add a bit of lead to the hook shank for even more weight. So yes, with a smaller bead and no lead you can fish them in slower water. 

Edited by Matt7082

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I've been out a couple of times and I still haven't given them a god try - a few minutes here and there. I need to dedicate a day to sooner than later.

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