fishfinder401

Fly fishing ri streams

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29 posts in this topic

44 mins ago, Zobi1 said:

oh, my apologies, I thought you were just starting out.  Have fun!

 

Fly fishing no(but I would say still a begginer) fly fishing for trout though I am completely new at

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Woolly buggers a great basic pattern.   It is my go to pattern.    I’d keep the fly’s simple.  Buy a couple of basic patterns and don’t get caught up buying a million flys.   Have a few basic nymph and dry fly patterns.  And streamers.    Learn to nymph fish.  I’m not very good at as I don’t trout fish much but it is clearly the most productive method.   

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1 hour ago, notime said:

Woolly buggers a great basic pattern.   It is my go to pattern.    I’d keep the fly’s simple.  Buy a couple of basic patterns and don’t get caught up buying a million flys.   Have a few basic nymph and dry fly patterns.  And streamers.    Learn to nymph fish.  I’m not very good at as I don’t trout fish much but it is clearly the most productive method.   

Ended up with success on an olive wooly bugger. Luckily thats a large part of what I throw for large mouth and panfish. In general I have been sticking to wooly buggers, clouser minnows of varying sizes. Some other baitfish imitators and poppers/gurglers... All fun and easy to tie, and they catch fish

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I'd reccomend a 3-5wt fly rod around the 7' mark for most RI trout streams.  8' would be a good option if you want to fish lakes too.  I'm not a fan of longer sticks due to the brush and overhanging branches we frequently encounter here. 

 

For fly line line, I just fish a rio trout now.   I used to have a Wulf long belly and really liked the distance I could get out of it.  Theres lots of tapers out there designed for small dries or big streamers, but the tapers on most intermediate lines seem to throw everything fine. Leaders can just be 20 lb mono that's blood knotted down to a tippet section of 4-6 lb.  I'd typically tie 6 ft for streamers and 9ft for dries, sometimes longer.

 

For flies, Wooly buggers are an easy way to get started.  Tie a few on size 6-10 hooks and you will be in business. Make sure to add a layer or two of wire or a bead to get them some weight. I use mostly olive, but white, black, and brown colors also work. I usually swing 'em or strip them in from a downstream perch.

 

For dry flies, size 10-22 work good.  I'd prioritize size, profile, and color over trying to match a specific pattern.  Also, I catch a decent # of fish on classic coachman flies, and there aren't too many bugs out there sporting bright red and green colors, so I'd prioritize having a range of sizes over a range of colors. 

 

You will find that freshly stocked trout will hit a wooly bugger no problem, but as the season progresses they become more picky.  This is when matching the insect hatch becomes more important.  No matter the season, I find wild browns and rainbows to be extremely picky eaters.   With wild brook trout, it depends on the day.  Also I've come to find browns will more readily take dry flies than rainbows.

 

For nymphing, I like the dry dropper technique.  First tie on a high floating fly.  Underneath that, fish a nymph, emerger pattern, or both.  The nymph should in most cases swing near the bottom.  Hairs ears, pheasant tails, scuds, caddis pupae,  and stone flies should be in your assortment.  Also do not leave out chironomid  larvae.  A small black simple chironomid imitation (like a size 22) fished off a dropper can sometimes be the difference between no fish, and a banner day.

 

-Also, a rubber net helps to make sure to get a healthy release on these fish and doesn't get caught up in thorns or errant flies.

 

-Flip over rocks and scan the banks to see what trout might be feeding on.

 

-Check the local stocking schedules and plan to show up within a week for easy bugger fishing.

 

-Insect hatches typically happen in the mornings and evenings, so fish dry flies and emergers accordingly.

 

-Move.  Reposition yourself on the stream to the optimal position to target an area before you make your first cast.  

 

-Wait.  If you spook a big fish with your fly, swing and miss, ect. Wait 5 minutes before throwing another cast. 

 

-Learn to fish different structure- Pools, riffles, runs, holes, and undercut banks.  They all require different techniques in order to pull fish out.  Approach each situation logically, and don't just carelessly slap a fly down.  Seasoned fish like natural presentations, and know when something isn't right.  Figure out the best approach to each situation before making a cast.

 

There is no way to avoid making a fool of yourself in stream fly fishing. That's just because there is a lot to learn.  That's also why its such an interesting pastime.  Spend enough time out there and eventually you'll look less stupid.

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, gorkmonster said:

I'd reccomend a 3-5wt fly rod around the 7' mark for most RI trout streams.  8' would be a good option if you want to fish lakes too.  I'm not a fan of longer sticks due to the brush and overhanging branches we frequently encounter here. 

 

For fly line line, I just fish a rio trout now.   I used to have a Wulf long belly and really liked the distance I could get out of it.  Theres lots of tapers out there designed for small dries or big streamers, but the tapers on most intermediate lines seem to throw everything fine. Leaders can just be 20 lb mono that's blood knotted down to a tippet section of 4-6 lb.  I'd typically tie 6 ft for streamers and 9ft for dries, sometimes longer.

 

For flies, Wooly buggers are an easy way to get started.  Tie a few on size 6-10 hooks and you will be in business. Make sure to add a layer or two of wire or a bead to get them some weight. I use mostly olive, but white, black, and brown colors also work. I usually swing 'em or strip them in from a downstream perch.

 

For dry flies, size 10-22 work good.  I'd prioritize size, profile, and color over trying to match a specific pattern.  Also, I catch a decent # of fish on classic coachman flies, and there aren't too many bugs out there sporting bright red and green colors, so I'd prioritize having a range of sizes over a range of colors. 

 

You will find that freshly stocked trout will hit a wooly bugger no problem, but as the season progresses they become more picky.  This is when matching the insect hatch becomes more important.  No matter the season, I find wild browns and rainbows to be extremely picky eaters.   With wild brook trout, it depends on the day.  Also I've come to find browns will more readily take dry flies than rainbows.

 

For nymphing, I like the dry dropper technique.  First tie on a high floating fly.  Underneath that, fish a nymph, emerger pattern, or both.  The nymph should in most cases swing near the bottom.  Hairs ears, pheasant tails, scuds, caddis pupae,  and stone flies should be in your assortment.  Also do not leave out chironomid  larvae.  A small black simple chironomid imitation (like a size 22) fished off a dropper can sometimes be the difference between no fish, and a banner day.

 

-Also, a rubber net helps to make sure to get a healthy release on these fish and doesn't get caught up in thorns or errant flies.

 

-Flip over rocks and scan the banks to see what trout might be feeding on.

 

-Check the local stocking schedules and plan to show up within a week for easy bugger fishing.

 

-Insect hatches typically happen in the mornings and evenings, so fish dry flies and emergers accordingly.

 

-Move.  Reposition yourself on the stream to the optimal position to target an area before you make your first cast.  

 

-Wait.  If you spook a big fish with your fly, swing and miss, ect. Wait 5 minutes before throwing another cast. 

 

-Learn to fish different structure- Pools, riffles, runs, holes, and undercut banks.  They all require different techniques in order to pull fish out.  Approach each situation logically, and don't just carelessly slap a fly down.  Seasoned fish like natural presentations, and know when something isn't right.  Figure out the best approach to each situation before making a cast.

 

There is no way to avoid making a fool of yourself in stream fly fishing. That's just because there is a lot to learn.  That's also why its such an interesting pastime.  Spend enough time out there and eventually you'll look less stupid.

 

 

 

Wow I am going to have to go over your response a lot haha. I went there with a 7ft 5 wt and glad I didnt bring something longer. Had some luck on a wooly bugger but also saw what i think were brook trout that wouldn't even look at my fly haha, definitly going back though. The toughest part honestly was working around people kayaking past every 15min.

Next time I may gice dry flys a shot

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On 5/24/2020 at 1:24 PM, fishfinder401 said:

Wow I am going to have to go over your response a lot haha. I went there with a 7ft 5 wt and glad I didnt bring something longer. Had some luck on a wooly bugger but also saw what i think were brook trout that wouldn't even look at my fly haha, definitly going back though. The toughest part honestly was working around people kayaking past every 15min.

Next time I may gice dry flys a shot

If they were Brook Trout, they were probably wild since it is very unusual for states to stock Brookies. Usually, they react pretty well to white/yellow dry flies like a sulphur or cahill if you fishing small creeks and pools. Personally, I've never had much fun on RI streams due to what you already know - the overhang. If you really want to get into this, go to Farmington in CT - world class...but it's a bit of a hike for you says the guy who drives 4 hours roundtrip to fish 2 hours of the evening hatch in the Catskills. 

 

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1 hour ago, Zobi1 said:

If they were Brook Trout, they were probably wild since it is very unusual for states to stock Brookies. Usually, they react pretty well to white/yellow dry flies like a sulphur or cahill if you fishing small creeks and pools. Personally, I've never had much fun on RI streams due to what you already know - the overhang. If you really want to get into this, go to Farmington in CT - world class...but it's a bit of a hike for you says the guy who drives 4 hours roundtrip to fish 2 hours of the evening hatch in the Catskills. 

 

that was my guess, either that or they were the smallest stocked raibows i have ever seen by a large margin. good to know to try those for them next time.

hmm, ill have to give it a try there some day, maybe hit a few places along the way and make a worthwhile trip out of it

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5 mins ago, fishfinder401 said:

that was my guess, either that or they were the smallest stocked raibows i have ever seen by a large margin. good to know to try those for them next time.

hmm, ill have to give it a try there some day, maybe hit a few places along the way and make a worthwhile trip out of it

if they were really small, could likely be wild brookies ... which are, in fact, the only native species to North America. Further, they are actually not in the trout family. They are genetically more related to Salmon! Easy to identify since they have white running along the bottom of their fins.  You can find lot's of good images online. For purists, catching a tiny wild rookie is more of an accomplishment than big stockers.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Zobi1 said:

if they were really small, could likely be wild brookies ... which are, in fact, the only native species to North America. Further, they are actually not in the trout family. They are genetically more related to Salmon! Easy to identify since they have white running along the bottom of their fins.  You can find lot's of good images online. For purists, catching a tiny wild rookie is more of an accomplishment than big stockers.

 

 

Sounds like that was what it was then. Only caught a few small wild brook trout years ago in a river up in mass... Wish I knew what I was doing better back then haha! I miss thay river.

Thats interesting... Didnt know they werent true trout. What about wild browns I hear about? Are those introduced too?

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45 mins ago, fishfinder401 said:

Sounds like that was what it was then. Only caught a few small wild brook trout years ago in a river up in mass... Wish I knew what I was doing better back then haha! I miss thay river.

Thats interesting... Didnt know they werent true trout. What about wild browns I hear about? Are those introduced too?

All browns in North America are introduced. They are native to Europe and sometimes called "German Browns." The definition of a "wild" trout is imprecise. If a stocked brown spawns, then you have wild browns. Some browns go out to the ocean and return to their river to spawn, but they don't die like Salmon. They can get very large. Not super common, but you can find them in at least one river on Long Island. Obviously, because they survived the ocean, they are "the smartest." You'll also find large browns that run from lakes to rivers. Same concept. If there are sea-run browns in RI, that would be news to me....but you never know what's in the mind of a fish!

 

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1 hour ago, Zobi1 said:

...Some browns go out to the ocean and return to their river to spawn, but they don't die like Salmon. .

 

Just Pacific salmon. Atlantic salmon don't die after spawning and are more closely related to brown trout that to the pacific salmon. :rav:

 

 

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Get yourself some caddis flies. Never met a trout that wouldn't go for a nice caddis. 

 

Also a map. There are some excellent rivers to fish in RI if you are willing to bush whack a bit and find where the fish are holding. 

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This is the biggest trout I’ve taken in the wood. Nothing for context but she was a fatty. 
 

I have a buddy that caught two salters In the pawcatuck. That bastard. 

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