fishfinder401

Fly fishing ri streams

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So recently I have been getting more and more into fly fishing, but haven't really gone for trout yet. Most of my trout experience has been going for stocked trout in lakes and ponds with powerbait, so wanting to fly fish some streams for trout I am at a little bit of a loss as to how to start and not make a fool out of myself haha. I do have one stream/ river i know of to try, so im not looking for anyone to give up any spots, but what are some do's and dont's with this type of fishing around here?

thanks for any tips

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1 min ago, fishfinder401 said:

So recently I have been getting more and more into fly fishing, but haven't really gone for trout yet. Most of my trout experience has been going for stocked trout in lakes and ponds with powerbait, so wanting to fly fish some streams for trout I am at a little bit of a loss as to how to start and not make a fool out of myself haha. I do have one stream/ river i know of to try, so im not looking for anyone to give up any spots, but what are some do's and dont's with this type of fishing around here?

thanks for any tips

I've been fly fishing the wood for years. Its a small stream so the biggest challenge is finding enough water to fish and not spooking the fish. Don't just walk down the middle of the stream to get around, hop up onto the bank and keep a wide berth from the pools as you are moving around. I usually hike until I see fish rising or find a nice pool; you will find that there are certain pools that always hold fish. I would just start out fishing streamers like wooly buggers and then move into dry flies after. Dry fly fishing can be very frustrating and if you don't know what you are doing you won't catch much or at all. Make sure your leader is as long and fine as possible and learn how to roll cast.

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1 hour ago, trwhite said:

I've been fly fishing the wood for years. Its a small stream so the biggest challenge is finding enough water to fish and not spooking the fish. Don't just walk down the middle of the stream to get around, hop up onto the bank and keep a wide berth from the pools as you are moving around. I usually hike until I see fish rising or find a nice pool; you will find that there are certain pools that always hold fish. I would just start out fishing streamers like wooly buggers and then move into dry flies after. Dry fly fishing can be very frustrating and if you don't know what you are doing you won't catch much or at all. Make sure your leader is as long and fine as possible and learn how to roll cast.

perfect, I already use wooly buggers a lot. what size range would you recommend?( i have mostly used them for bass and panfish so far)

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24 mins ago, fishfinder401 said:

perfect, I already use wooly buggers a lot. what size range would you recommend?( i have mostly used them for bass and panfish so far)

I think I usually use size 6. Trout love them, its an easy way to start catching them and see where they hide out

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1 min ago, trwhite said:

I think I usually use size 6. Trout love them, its an easy way to start catching them and see where they hide out

awesome, ill give that a try then!

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trout is methadone fishing meant for the winter. :laugh:

 

(ive gotten some fat boy rainbows in the wood..id always have a little spinning set up with a small jerkbait for the deeper pools)

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Try fishing with a streamer - Mickey Finn pattern.  Swing it and add darting action by using your fingers.  

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1 hour ago, DZ said:

Try fishing with a streamer - Mickey Finn pattern.  Swing it and add darting action by using your fingers.  

Ooh, ill check out that pattern

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This spring has been difficult fishing most streams like the Wood. The Wood gets feed from 5 different streams in the head waters.

So that's a lot of water flow accumulating along the way with all the rain we've had lately. Most streams are above their normal heights this time of year. In cases like that find the wider bends in the river where the currents might be a little slower and have deeper pools. Bead head and weighted nymph, and streamer might work with sinking lines. If you have the skill, casting up-stream with an indicator jigging the fly along the ripples at a constant depth works too. Most beginners cast across stream, mend, let the line get tight, and strip up the fly up-stream. That works sometimes but not the norm for an experienced fly angler.

 

I haven't fished it in a few years, but there is also Deep Pond, a fly fishing only pond close to the Wood near the high banks section.

I always enjoyed that pond, since most fish are returned. I've lost a ton of flies there too, with all the brush on the bottom.  

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2 hours ago, Capt.Castafly said:

This spring has been difficult fishing most streams like the Wood. The Wood gets feed from 5 different streams in the head waters.

So that's a lot of water flow accumulating along the way with all the rain we've had lately. Most streams are above their normal heights this time of year. In cases like that find the wider bends in the river where the currents might be a little slower and have deeper pools. Bead head and weighted nymph, and streamer might work with sinking lines. If you have the skill, casting up-stream with an indicator jigging the fly along the ripples at a constant depth works too. Most beginners cast across stream, mend, let the line get tight, and strip up the fly up-stream. That works sometimes but not the norm for an experienced fly angler.

 

I haven't fished it in a few years, but there is also Deep Pond, a fly fishing only pond close to the Wood near the high banks section.

I always enjoyed that pond, since most fish are returned. I've lost a ton of flies there too, with all the brush on the bottom.  

Thanks, I really appreciate those tips, im used to fly fishing mostly still waters so those tips will be very useful 

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I'm not knowledgeable about RI rivers, but here's some things to consider.

 

First, fly fishing is a very diverse style of fishing and I am of the firm belief that you have to enjoy the journey of learning in order to really get the most out of it. It can be very frustrating for beginners since catching can be far more elusive when you're not chucking bait.

 

I fished for 30 years much the way folks here have already described. Then, I started to get into "Contact Nymphing" which is also called Euro Nymphing and a few others names. It opened an entirely new journey of learning.

 

When you see a trout rising taking bugs on the surface, it's quite intoxicating to then hunt for that fish.  However, the fact is, those fish make up maybe 10%-20% of the total fish population that are feeding. The rest are all subsurface feeding on nymphs. I like the math of nymph fishing.

 

Contact Nymphing is a particular technique which once mastered, and it doesn't take long, you'll catch more fish, more often - period. I still dry fly fish occasionally, but I also like catching fish - again, the math says it all.

 

Youtube is your friend ... search for "Contact Nymphing" and "George Daniels" ... you'll discover another world of fly fishing that is highly productive.

 

If you enjoy the journey, you'll love it. 

 

ps ... stripers on a fly rod are quite something. But that's a different discussion for another day.

 

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4 hours ago, Zobi1 said:

I'm not knowledgeable about RI rivers, but here's some things to consider.

 

First, fly fishing is a very diverse style of fishing and I am of the firm belief that you have to enjoy the journey of learning in order to really get the most out of it. It can be very frustrating for beginners since catching can be far more elusive when you're not chucking bait.

 

I fished for 30 years much the way folks here have already described. Then, I started to get into "Contact Nymphing" which is also called Euro Nymphing and a few others names. It opened an entirely new journey of learning.

 

When you see a trout rising taking bugs on the surface, it's quite intoxicating to then hunt for that fish.  However, the fact is, those fish make up maybe 10%-20% of the total fish population that are feeding. The rest are all subsurface feeding on nymphs. I like the math of nymph fishing.

 

Contact Nymphing is a particular technique which once mastered, and it doesn't take long, you'll catch more fish, more often - period. I still dry fly fish occasionally, but I also like catching fish - again, the math says it all.

 

Youtube is your friend ... search for "Contact Nymphing" and "George Daniels" ... you'll discover another world of fly fishing that is highly productive.

 

If you enjoy the journey, you'll love it. 

 

ps ... stripers on a fly rod are quite something. But that's a different discussion for another day.

 

Oh I am definitly enjoying the journey. I started like 10 years ago when I was in niddleschool with a cheap combo and over time it has slowly become more and more of my freshwater fishing for bass, bluegill and perch. This year ot has kind of taken over as my main method and i relaised I should expand to othwr species

 

I will deffinitly look that technique up and give it a try!

 

And yeah... Strippers and some shallow water fluke are next on my list to try haha, already have some tackle to use for it and some ideas of locations, but thats a conversation for another thread haha

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15 mins ago, fishfinder401 said:

Oh I am definitly enjoying the journey. I started like 10 years ago when I was in niddleschool with a cheap combo and over time it has slowly become more and more of my freshwater fishing for bass, bluegill and perch. This year ot has kind of taken over as my main method and i relaised I should expand to othwr species

 

I will deffinitly look that technique up and give it a try!

 

And yeah... Strippers and some shallow water fluke are next on my list to try haha, already have some tackle to use for it and some ideas of locations, but thats a conversation for another thread haha

oh, my apologies, I thought you were just starting out.  Have fun!

 

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