Rob greenpond

Waders —stocking foot or boot foot types?

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Hello all,

In an earlier thread you all helped me select an all around beach rod for fishing all around Cape Cod beaches and Massachusetts south shore areas (sand, gravel, and sometimes rocky areas—or mix).  The Shimano Tiralejo 9’6”, 1-3 was the winner.

 

Now looking at waders and wondering what you all recommend for the “above described fishing terrain” (fishing mostly May —early Sept).  I currently have a 20 year old pair of Simms guide model gortex/breathable waders (very light use trout fishing and no leaks yet) and just need new wader boots.   Was about to buy some Cabelas wader boots ($80), then saw a pair of Cabelas boot foot neoprene waders, 3.5mm, w 200 gram insulated boots (light insulation) for $140.

 

I’m torn between just grabbing the boots and using my Simms waders or “switching to neoprene boot foot style waders.”  Thinking the boot foot might be just easier/simpler on/off and may better seal out sand, pebbles and junk from getting inside shoes.  

 

Any opinions between stocking-foot breathable waders “versus” neoprene boots foot (all one piece) for saltwater beaches and rock use?  Assuming felt bottom with either choice.

 

Thanks in advance for any opinions!!

Rob

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As I'm getting older, lazier and want to protect my bad back with less bending I prefer bootfoot.   Strictly a matter of convenience for me, so this is probably little help.     

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I have a pair of each and unless it's so cold that I absolutely need the neoprene for warmth I reach for the stocking foot every time.  I tend to do a lot of walking in them so that also plays a role.

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Hey MartyK —your opinion matters more than you think....I can do without unnecessary bending as well myself and that was one reason for thinking boot foot might be easier....just pull them on and go.   No fighting to get the neoprene bootie into the shoe...etc.  

Although admittedly the stocking foots are comfy once on.

Dilema?

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If you are planning on climbing over a lot of rocks, I think the stocking foot wader gives you more range of motion.  Much easier to hop up on a rock that is thigh or waist high.  If your areas are mostly sand beaches, then the boot foot keeps out the sand better. 

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Both.

 

Its a difficult decision and over my life their have been times where I preferred both styles. As of now I am using boot foot.   With he beaches you are fishing and the back bays I would go with boot foot.  When you go to the canal you don't need waders just good boots with ankle support.  

 

If I was fishing mtk or bolder fields I am going with stocking foot for the support. 

 

I love jumping out of the truck and having waders on in 30 seconds.  no need to tie  or have sand get in the boot.  

 

My big tip would be buy gel inserts and take them with you when you buy  the waders. 

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I have a new hole in the bottom of my stocking foot waders which I think is from sand getting in the boots and walking around on it. I think the abrasion ripped of the sand against my foot in the boot is what ripped the neoprene. Reached out to Redington but they are closed currently. Found out 4 days after the 1 year warranty ended too... Don't know if anyone else ever experienced that before but it really made me consider getting boot foot next time for sandy beaches.

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I use both. Mainly use stocking foot with sandals. I think they are more versatile as you can use them with sandals or wading boots.   

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I prefer stocking foot because I walk a lot and have bad feet but I’m always dealing with sand getting in my boots. I’ve tried everything to keep it out and nothing has really worked yet. Most people I know prefer boot foot for the sand reason and they’re faster to put on. I usually put mine on before I go and just drive with them on.

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Thanks for the input so far everyone!  Good idea on bringing some gel inserts along when trying boot-foot waders on.  Also, another good comments is that the boot-foot keep the sand out and I personally liked the 30 second slip on NO laces to deal with—especially no bending as I’m getting older/lazier too....to be honest!

 

Anyone else please feel free to chime in....

 

Rob

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Ps.  Yes at the canal I just use 16” neoprene lacrosse boots—good ankle support and traction on those deadly rocks.  No need for waders there unless you have a death wish lol!

Rob

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Twilson—copy that and thinking same thing.  The lighted neoprene boot foot is 3.5mm with min insulation boot is about 200 gram thinsulate.....think I’ll roast fishing early evenings in the summer months?  

 

Ya just a quick hour or two it’s nice to pull them on and just go....no fuss

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8 hours ago, TinyTrout said:

I have a new hole in the bottom of my stocking foot waders which I think is from sand getting in the boots and walking around on it. I think the abrasion ripped of the sand against my foot in the boot is what ripped the neoprene. Reached out to Redington but they are closed currently. Found out 4 days after the 1 year warranty ended too... Don't know if anyone else ever experienced that before but it really made me consider getting boot foot next time for sandy beaches.

Yep, it happens that's what usually kills mine. If I just fished sand I'd wear bootfoots. But, I'm on jetties and rocks to so the ankle support of wading boots is kinda necessary.

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4 hours ago, Rob greenpond said:

Twilson—copy that and thinking same thing.  The lighted neoprene boot foot is 3.5mm with min insulation boot is about 200 gram thinsulate.....think I’ll roast fishing early evenings in the summer months?  

 

Ya just a quick hour or two it’s nice to pull them on and just go....no fuss

Neoprenes are warm. The only time wear them is in the winter duck hunting. You would roast in the summertime.

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