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Best cut for roast beef?

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They sell a lot of spoon roasts at my local Market Basket.  Was talking with the Manager there one day and he said the spoon roast is a top sirloin  before it is cut additionally into steaks.  At least that is their version of it. It is quite tasty.

 

 

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On 5/17/2020 at 10:11 AM, JimW said:

I’ve never seen a spoon roast on any cut chart.  Always thought it was a marketing name for top sirloin roast.  Kind of like flat iron for a piece of blade. 

Cut names are very regional too. 1st time I ever worked in a store near NY and someone asked me for a shell steak. I was like WTF? The rest of the world calls it a strip or ny strip. And thats all I knew at that moment. 

 

Spoon should always come from the top butt. But I've seen roasts labeled top sirloin or sirloin that were cut from the sirloin knuckle.  Which kinda sucks as a roast. 

 

My advice. Top Butt "Spoon" roast.  

Depending on how big you want. I would have them face off the front side. Take off 1 or 2 steaks.  You should be past the the gnarly nerve in the center.  Trim the cap to 1/4in. Underside should have the knot of fat between the cap removed and the skin & fat on the underside trimmed off as well.  

 

Tie it nice and firm and your G2G!

Edited by PSegnatelli

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On ‎5‎/‎12‎/‎2020 at 2:42 PM, Steve in Mass said:

Gotta be careful when buying a 'rump roast" for roast beef. The rump roast comes from the bottom of the round, so it is a bit more tough than top round. While true rump roast can make a very good roast beef, if just plain old bottom round is passed off as rump roast, you will not be happy. Bottom round is best for stews or other braised dishes like pot roast. And is fairly good for smoking. But you would not want to make a traditional oven roast beef from it.

 In the background is a gooseneck. In the middle is a bottom flat , eye round removed and the heal removed ( rat still intact ) cleaned up. Foreground is the back rump roast , center cut roast and the bottom round roast.

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This is a hip also called a top sirloin. Cap has been removed and cleaned up. The cap with the fat intact, is the Brazilian picanha.  Note the three blood vessels , can't confuse with the tri-tip. If I was to remove the meat from the cap and thin out the cap fat to 1/4 inch and tie it back on to the creamed hip, it would be a spoon roast. Thanks.

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On 5/30/2020 at 5:28 PM, ribeye said:

This is a hip also called a top sirloin. Cap has been removed and cleaned up. The cap with the fat intact, is the Brazilian picanha.  Note the three blood vessels , can't confuse with the tri-tip. If I was to remove the meat from the cap and thin out the cap fat to 1/4 inch and tie it back on to the creamed hip, it would be a spoon roast. Thanks.

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Now that you mention it...the sirloin cap is one of the best cuts I have ever eaten.  I take the whole thing cover it in a rub (usually montreal seasoning) and indirectly cook it on a 500 degree weber charcoal grill to medium.   Let it rest and slice it up and you are in Heaven! Got a bunch of them in my freezer and am having fun cooking them up on the weekends lately during the current situation.

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The cut has been well discussed but I'm surprised no one has brought up dry brining the meat

Gives it flavor and tenderizes it

The key is the salt. 

 

It's a 16 to 18 hour process, I do it in two steps

 

First, dry the meat with paper towels and liberally salt the meat with kosher salt, wrap it tight in plastic wrap and put it in the fridge overnight. The salt will draw out juices, then over time will draw them back in with the salt, tenderizing and flavoring the meat.

 

Make a dry rub, you can use any herbs and spices you like but don't add salt since it's already doing it's thing on the meat, and do add some brown sugar. Avoid prepackaged rubs as they often contain salt and odd chemicals.

Coat the meat well, place in a container and put back into the fridge for a few hours (if you wrap it tight in plastic again a lot of the rub will come off when you unwrap it)

 

I've become a convert to the reverse sear method of cooking. You really need a digital thermometer to do it right, but you can get a decent one at an unlooted Target for about $15

 

Low oven, 225 degrees until the roast hits 110 degrees for medium rare (that's for a thick roast, for a thinner one like a filet, take it to 115 degrees). If you have a sous vide machine you're golden.

Take it out and let it rest until the internal temp drops 10 degrees, It's going to go up before it goes down, this can take up to an hour

 

On a smoking hot pan (best done outside with cast iron) brown the outside. Build a good crust, the sugar in the rub will help with that. If the pan isn't smoking hot you'll cook the inside, you don't want that. Be careful not to burn it. This goes really fast.

 

Since you already rested the meat you can slice and serve right away. Should be pink from edge to edge with none of that grey looking meat between the crust and the pink we all grew up eating.

 

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A roast beef to me has always been a rib roast - ribs separated - salt pepper garlic all over everything, tie the ribs back on, salt pepper garlic all over again, then into a 450-degree oven for 20-minutes, then lower the temp to 250 and roast till meat thermometer reads 115, take out of oven cover with foil and let it sit at least 30-minutes, then slice, eat and be in heaven for a little while.

This method does not produce a great deal of pan juices to make gravy, but reasonable gravy can be made from the small amount of pan drippings and high quality beef stock.

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1 hour ago, The Zen Master said:

A roast beef to me has always been a rib roast - ribs separated - salt pepper garlic all over everything, tie the ribs back on, salt pepper garlic all over again, then into a 450-degree oven for 20-minutes, then lower the temp to 250 and roast till meat thermometer reads 115, take out of oven cover with foil and let it sit at least 30-minutes, then slice, eat and be in heaven for a little while.

This method does not produce a great deal of pan juices to make gravy, but reasonable gravy can be made from the small amount of pan drippings and high quality beef stock.

I love rib roast. In my cooking days I worked at a place in Lake Placid NY region that would do rib roast every weekend.  We would coat it in  garlic & rosemary paste. Then bury & bake it in rocksalt.  U got a giant head of broccoli with cheesewiz and a baked potato.   That place was awesome!

 

Then in my meatcutter days..

I used to have a couple of customers that requested sliced suet to be tied to the rib roast.   And one guy would get 2 full untrimmed bone in ribs usda prime every Christmas. 

 

If money & health was no option I could be pretty happy with rib. 

 

 

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You guys are making me hungry !  Going back to the OP's original question, I think I have an answer that solves both issues he raised. This is one of my family's favorite recipes, and one you will want to keep coming back to year after year.

It's more of a pot roast than a traditional roast beef ( prime rib ) , but it will melt in your mouth and give you the best tasting gravy .  Serve with mashed potatoes and you are in business.

 

Get a 3-4 pound back rump roast .  Season with salt and pepper. Put in slow cooker with a large can of Cream of Mushroom soup.  Cook 7-8 hours , or until very tender.  Meat will practically fall apart. It's that simple !  Use the liquid in the pan for gravy - nothing needs to be added. Wife will be happy since it looks well done, and you will be happy because it is moist and flavorful. I also add some butter on mine when I plate it for even more flavor.  My Mom used to make it in the oven by using a tent of aluminum foil, but unless the tent is perfect with no leaks, it won't keep the steam and liquid in which is the secret to keeping the meat moist.  Slow cooker is much easier, and guarantees gravy will stay in the pan.

 

Try it- you'll like it !

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16 hours ago, optimist said:

You guys are making me hungry !  Going back to the OP's original question, I think I have an answer that solves both issues he raised. This is one of my family's favorite recipes, and one you will want to keep coming back to year after year.

It's more of a pot roast than a traditional roast beef ( prime rib ) , but it will melt in your mouth and give you the best tasting gravy .  Serve with mashed potatoes and you are in business.

 

Get a 3-4 pound back rump roast .  Season with salt and pepper. Put in slow cooker with a large can of Cream of Mushroom soup.  Cook 7-8 hours , or until very tender.  Meat will practically fall apart. It's that simple !  Use the liquid in the pan for gravy - nothing needs to be added. Wife will be happy since it looks well done, and you will be happy because it is moist and flavorful. I also add some butter on mine when I plate it for even more flavor.  My Mom used to make it in the oven by using a tent of aluminum foil, but unless the tent is perfect with no leaks, it won't keep the steam and liquid in which is the secret to keeping the meat moist.  Slow cooker is much easier, and guarantees gravy will stay in the pan.

 

Try it- you'll like it !

Thanks!

I'll try this this week.

JD

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19 hours ago, optimist said:

You guys are making me hungry !  Going back to the OP's original question, I think I have an answer that solves both issues he raised. This is one of my family's favorite recipes, and one you will want to keep coming back to year after year.

It's more of a pot roast than a traditional roast beef ( prime rib ) , but it will melt in your mouth and give you the best tasting gravy .  Serve with mashed potatoes and you are in business.

 

Get a 3-4 pound back rump roast .  Season with salt and pepper. Put in slow cooker with a large can of Cream of Mushroom soup.  Cook 7-8 hours , or until very tender.  Meat will practically fall apart. It's that simple !  Use the liquid in the pan for gravy - nothing needs to be added. Wife will be happy since it looks well done, and you will be happy because it is moist and flavorful. I also add some butter on mine when I plate it for even more flavor.  My Mom used to make it in the oven by using a tent of aluminum foil, but unless the tent is perfect with no leaks, it won't keep the steam and liquid in which is the secret to keeping the meat moist.  Slow cooker is much easier, and guarantees gravy will stay in the pan.

 

Try it- you'll like it !

That is fine, but I do not consider that "roast beef"....it is pot roast or stew, entirely different meal.

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On 6/14/2020 at 0:26 PM, optimist said:

You guys are making me hungry !  Going back to the OP's original question, I think I have an answer that solves both issues he raised. This is one of my family's favorite recipes, and one you will want to keep coming back to year after year.

It's more of a pot roast than a traditional roast beef ( prime rib ) , but it will melt in your mouth and give you the best tasting gravy .  Serve with mashed potatoes and you are in business.

 

Get a 3-4 pound back rump roast .  Season with salt and pepper. Put in slow cooker with a large can of Cream of Mushroom soup.  Cook 7-8 hours , or until very tender.  Meat will practically fall apart. It's that simple !  Use the liquid in the pan for gravy - nothing needs to be added. Wife will be happy since it looks well done, and you will be happy because it is moist and flavorful. I also add some butter on mine when I plate it for even more flavor.  My Mom used to make it in the oven by using a tent of aluminum foil, but unless the tent is perfect with no leaks, it won't keep the steam and liquid in which is the secret to keeping the meat moist.  Slow cooker is much easier, and guarantees gravy will stay in the pan.

 

Try it- you'll like it !

 

On 6/15/2020 at 7:52 AM, Steve in Mass said:

That is fine, but I do not consider that "roast beef"....it is pot roast or stew, entirely different meal.

Sooooo here's what I did.

Got a 4lb rump.

Cut into 1/4s.

Marinated it in bourbon, low sodium Montreal Steak seasoning (next time I'm making my own), extra  onion powder, extra garlic powder, parsley and smoked paprika for two days.

Dried and and re-applied Montreal Steak seasoning.

In sauce pan, butter, chopped onion, chopped mushrooms, garlic, parsley... sautéed.

In cock pot on low, contents of sauce pan, large can of cream of mushroom should and one rounded tablespoon of beef better than bullion and a large can of mushrooms.

In hot skillet w/ Ghee, quickly browned beef sections on each side & then into the cook pot.

On slow for 8 hours.

Served w/ mashed potatoes, green beans sautéed w/ bacon.

Pretty good flavor but over cooked and way too salty. Gravy seemed fatty even though I skimmed off much of the fat. Wife really liked it which surprised me. She's very sensitive to salt and isn't a fan of roasts. I think she enjoyed how tender it was (just barely short of falling apart) and the implication of well doneness due to the browning. 

Next time I will omit the better than bullion (makes things too salty), make my own seasoning blend and only apply once, cook shorter, use more fresh mushrooms and none from can.

When I get time I'll make more stock.

Pic below isn't pretty, there's a glare on the plate that makes it look smeared up, it's not.

Thanks gents.

JD

 

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Always interesting to experiment and modify the recipe to " make it your own " , but in this case, I think you would be more than satisfied if you try the  "original " recipe .  It's very simple, with less steps, and I guarantee it will be one of your family favorites once you try it.  Just about foolproof, too, with the exception of cooking time.  If you don't cook it long enough, it won't be fall apart tender .

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