dmac95

Beginner boat buyer - need advice

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1 hour ago, dmac95 said:

how old are we talking for johnsons?

Just avoid the ficht models and you’re fine with the old 2 strokes. If they are taken care of those  95-00‘s have tons of life in them.

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1 hour ago, Captain Ahab said:

It is going to be a buyers market this year.  I am partial to a w/a mako they come with mercs usually but i would not be upset with yams

I think you’ll see a really nice buyers market come fall to early winter. I’m not to sure the summer will be a great buyers market just yet.

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There are a lot of good boat builders out there that few people have heard of.  These boats have lower resale values because of it.  I love Grady's, but the resale prices are outrageous.   

 

Based on your wants, a SeaPro 206 WalkAround model could be had in decent condition for under $20,000.  

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13 hours ago, Captain Tuttle said:

There are a lot of good boat builders out there that few people have heard of.  These boats have lower resale values because of it.  I love Grady's, but the resale prices are outrageous.   

 

Based on your wants, a SeaPro 206 WalkAround model could be had in decent condition for under $20,000.  

Other than cosmetics/comfort, is there any difference to reliability of a seapro 206 to a grady?

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21 hours ago, MakoMike said:

Try looking st sea ox, very similar to Grady, but built better and usually cheaper. Best bet is to find one that needs to be repowered.

Very solid boat.  I had the 20-foot commercial version, and did things with it that the maker never intended.  The boat handled it all in stride.

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2 hours ago, CWitek said:

Very solid boat.  I had the 20-foot commercial version, and did things with it that the maker never intended.  The boat handled it all in stride.

Alright, we are getting somewhere. Now how would u see me getting it for 10k?

Edited by dmac95

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When I was shopping for Grady's last winter there were older (think mid-late 90s) 208 Overnighters with 2-stokes to be found in the $10-12k range.  Same with Pursuit walkaround from similar years.   But as others have mentioned, plenty of other options like SeaPro, Proline, key west, sea ox where you might find newer options for the same $.   If you're trying to stick to a budget, I think it's easier to look at everything available and then do your homework on the motors, rather than looking for a specific boat/motor combo.     

 

Plenty of online resources (both from dealers, and person-to-person) to seach by style, length, and price, and start to get a ballpark idea of your options.  Plus just go walk around marinas and look at different setups.  In the 19-21' range, cabins do take up usable deck space, so some models are pretty tight for fishing and summer boating activities.  With curtains, some center-consoles and dual consoles can be buttoned up to keep you relatively out of the elements for winter boating.   I ended up with a walkaround cause my kids love the cabin and we occasionally overnight, but overall I prefer center consoles.  

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On 5/4/2020 at 10:49 AM, dmac95 said:

[EDIT] TLDR: I am looking to buy a boat. Is there a "toyota" of boats? Cheap, reliable, and bulky as a 4runner, but not as huge as a tundra? 

 

Howdy. I'm looking for a fishing boat to tow around with my truck, but since this is my first one, I don't want it too be too expensive, too big, too small. I'm thinking about a 20-21ft grady/parker with a cabin. I prefer to not get splashed with water and would like something to block wind during the colder season, hence my choice for a cabin.

The issue is that there aren't many of grady's parker's for sale at reasonable prices.

 

The only grady's that seem to be for sale are the ones with johnson motors are <10k, and that doesn't do well for me, because the motor is in my eyes the most important part - wouldn't like to swim to shore with the family in worst case scenario. 

 

Long story short, I would like an alternative to the two brands above. Is there any boat out there that is stable, 20-21 ft and an underdog/or is affordable? I prefer to come with Tohatsu, Yamaha, or Honda engine just for reliability sake.

A few thoughts:

- 20-21 ft boat you are going to get wet - every time you go out. Invest in some quality rain gear and a bean bag chair for the wife.

- You don't want a 21 ft boat with a cabin. 21 ft is just too small for a cuddy. Other than to store stuff, it's useless. The cuddy takes up way to much fishing room and you could never actually be inside it when the boat is moving unless you like taking rise in washing machines.  Every small cuddy cabin boat I have every rode in pounds.  Especially those Parkers. The only reason to get a cuddy is if it's a deal breaker for the wife.  After one boat ride she will realize cuddy's suck and a bean bag and some goretex is better.  There is a reason there are so few of these boats around.

- Your motor is as important or perhaps even more important that your boat.  There are lots of reliable brands out there.  If buying used, it all depends on how the motor was serviced and how it was used (abused).   It is also very important to choose a motor that can be serviced close to home.  Not as easy as you think on Long Island. For example, don't buy a Tohatsu if the closest Tohatsu mechanic is 75 miles away.

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2 hours ago, dmac95 said:

Alright, we are getting somewhere. Now how would u see me getting it for 10k?

The first thing you need to do is find one.  They stopped making them a few years ago, so you've got to search the various used boat publications to find someone who has one to sell.  Then you need to get a surveyor and make sure that it's still in decent shape.  Pay particular attention to the transom, wiring and fuel tank, which tend to be where older boats go bad.

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8 hours ago, dmac95 said:

Other than cosmetics/comfort, is there any difference to reliability of a seapro 206 to a grady?

Reliability is word usually associated with engines.  You'll get a lot of opinions on engines, but the best advice I got was chose an engine with a good mechanic nearby who will service it quickly for you during the summer months.   

 

Most hulls are reliable.  Some are better in rough seas.  Marine manufacturers give warranties on hulls like the automotive industry gives warranties on drivetrains, because they are not going to fail in the first 10 years.  What does fail on a boat is the deck, gas tank, wiring, etc.  Stand on some 30 year old Grady's and you'll likely find a lot of soft spots.    

 

Grady is considered top tier manufacturing (although they use wood in construction - reason to use wood in this day and age) where SeaPro is considered mid-tier.   SeaPro has a reputation for being a solid boat, with an all fiberglass transom.  Some people in the industry considered them at the top of the mid-tier line.   

 

Good luck on your quest.  You could study this for years.  Take the plunge but don't get yourself into too much debt.  Eventually, you'll learn that there is no such thing as the perfect boat.  The best type of boat to buy is the one that you'll use often.  

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3 hours ago, Cpalms said:

A few thoughts:

- 20-21 ft boat you are going to get wet - every time you go out. Invest in some quality rain gear and a bean bag chair for the wife.

- You don't want a 21 ft boat with a cabin. 21 ft is just too small for a cuddy. Other than to store stuff, it's useless. The cuddy takes up way to much fishing room and you could never actually be inside it when the boat is moving unless you like taking rise in washing machines.  Every small cuddy cabin boat I have every rode in pounds.  Especially those Parkers. The only reason to get a cuddy is if it's a deal breaker for the wife.  After one boat ride she will realize cuddy's suck and a bean bag and some goretex is better.  There is a reason there are so few of these boats around.

- Your motor is as important or perhaps even more important that your boat.  There are lots of reliable brands out there.  If buying used, it all depends on how the motor was serviced and how it was used (abused).   It is also very important to choose a motor that can be serviced close to home.  Not as easy as you think on Long Island. For example, don't buy a Tohatsu if the closest Tohatsu mechanic is 75 miles away.

I'd go only with the cuddy solely due to that big bulge in the frnt blocking the wend when fishing from the rear of the boat, that and I like standing in the back as I get sea sick a lot. I'll only be going under 10mph wind in long island sound - so while I might get wet, the big deal breaker would be the wind. If I'm wrong here and running in circles, then what would be the best priced cc that is reliabile?

 

What I'm starting to look for is a good deal - which is hard to find near where I live -  so I guess I'll have to make a few distance trips. First comes the engine right? Yamaha, Tohatsu, honda, Mercury. Then hull and a tandem trailer. The most thing I've done so far with boat motors after visiting a few sellers is do a compression and spark test. I'm hoping that if I do land a deal on a good engine brand that has high and even compression, then I lower the chance if being skunked, who knows.

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31 mins ago, Captain Tuttle said:

Reliability is word usually associated with engines.  You'll get a lot of opinions on engines, but the best advice I got was chose an engine with a good mechanic nearby who will service it quickly for you during the summer months.   

 

Most hulls are reliable.  Some are better in rough seas.  Marine manufacturers give warranties on hulls like the automotive industry gives warranties on drivetrains, because they are not going to fail in the first 10 years.  What does fail on a boat is the deck, gas tank, wiring, etc.  Stand on some 30 year old Grady's and you'll likely find a lot of soft spots.    

 

Grady is considered top tier manufacturing (although they use wood in construction - reason to use wood in this day and age) where SeaPro is considered mid-tier.   SeaPro has a reputation for being a solid boat, with an all fiberglass transom.  Some people in the industry considered them at the top of the mid-tier line.   

 

Good luck on your quest.  You could study this for years.  Take the plunge but don't get yourself into too much debt.  Eventually, you'll learn that there is no such thing as the perfect boat.  The best type of boat to buy is the one that you'll use often.  

There was a boat I wanted but I quickly realized that there is a difference in motor quality brand more so than the difference in hull brands. That one was for 7k; I thought If I could get "that" boat just with a yamaha, i'd be comfortable in paying 2-3k more than the evinrude.

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5 hours ago, Cpalms said:

 

- You don't want a 21 ft boat with a cabin. 21 ft is just too small for a cuddy. Other than to store stuff, it's useless. The cuddy takes up way to much fishing room and you could never actually be inside it when the boat is moving unless you like taking rise in washing machines.  Every small cuddy cabin boat I have every rode in pounds.  Especially those Parkers. The only reason to get a cuddy is if it's a deal breaker for the wife.  After one boat ride she will realize cuddy's suck and a bean bag and some goretex is better.  There is a reason there are so few of these boats around.

-

This

 

My wife wanted a cabin.  Kept bugging me.  So I took her to the laundry room, opened the dryer and told her to climb in.

 

Yeah, I had to explain that too

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15 hours ago, CWitek said:

The first thing you need to do is find one.  They stopped making them a few years ago, so you've got to search the various used boat publications to find someone who has one to sell.  Then you need to get a surveyor and make sure that it's still in decent shape.  Pay particular attention to the transom, wiring and fuel tank, which tend to be where older boats go bad.

100 percent agree.  You get a steal with a bad tank and transom you now just bought something you will have to pay to throw away

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