DeepBlue85

Fat tire bikes

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Fat bikes are where it’s at for beach access.  For best sand performance, look for one with tires in the 4.8” size range.  For budget bikes, the Mongoose is ok, but also look at models by Framed https://www.framedbikes.com/

 

In salt air areas, corrosion is of course a concern.  I suggest looking for one with hydraulic brakes instead of cable actuated, as it's less of a maintenance issue with corrosion concerns.  If your only use is relatively flat beach riding, brakes may rarely be used.  
 

In short, the bikes perform very well on sand with 4.8”+ tires, and you can cover a lot of beach. 
 

Greg

Edited by GregO
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I picked up a Mongoose Hitch a couple years ago. I mostly use it to get to spots where parking is tricky apposed to riding miles on the sand. It was under $300 and can support me in my current fighting weight of  285. Threw a cheap luggage rack with a milk crate and rod holder and I'm good to go.

 

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4 hours ago, fatbikerjoe said:

Sorry, didn't mean to be a hater on the 'goose.  My background is a former XXC cross country racer so I was pretty hard on the mountain bike.  If it's working for you then that's great.  Didn't you replace a lot of the components though?

Discussion is in the link I posted above. That I can recall: 

Pedals

Lower bracket

Shifters

Handle bars and grips

Seat stem and clamp

Tires

 

Weight savings was around four pounds I think. 
 

The seat was adequate so I left it stock. 
 

I would have swapped out the brakes for hydraulics if I was doing trail work and stopping on a dime was important. They work fine on the beach or sidewalk. 
 

Again, the Costco bike would have solved most of the above and comes with an alloy frame and stem. 
 

The cheapest item at bikes.com and similar were 2-3X the WalGoose. For a concept ride, I couldn’t justify. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

****...I literally JUST started reading this thread and 'bike ads' are in the margin.

I'm not a conspiracy guy...but the GOOGLE WATCHES. :bigeyes:

SO....If I can buy a 'promo bike' (think no name brand) with 4 INCH TIRES for bout $325 -- Is it worth it? ....FOUR INCH TIRES IS STILL 'acceptable' to ride with... I weigh 180 (prob. more after #Budcanz last night)

Edited by granpappyofpork
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1 hour ago, granpappyofpork said:

****...I literally JUST started reading this thread and 'bike ads' are in the margin.

I'm not a conspiracy guy...but the GOOGLE WATCHES. :bigeyes:

SO....If I can buy a 'promo bike' (think no name brand) with 4 INCH TIRES for bout $325 -- Is it worth it? ....FOUR INCH TIRES IS STILL 'acceptable' to ride with... I weigh 180 (prob. more after #Budcanz last night)

I weigh 205 on a good day. I swapped out the Mongoose factory tires for a less aggressive tread and I pressure down to about 5-8psi with factory tubes. I have the stuff to go tubeless but just have not found the need for it. 

 

I have no axe to grind for Costco's bike but for the budget minded, who might not get all that much use out of it (a few rides per season), this is worth consideration, if you can find one. Unfortunately, I have not seen this in a local store since Christmas, but it was $329 when I saw it and almost bought it, just to upgrade from the Mongoose. Out of the box this bike is at least 10 pounds lighter than the factory goose. Since I already have two people who will buy the Walgoose in a minute, this would be an easy upgrade. Sadly, I got distracted, never bought it and have not seen one since and they do not have them online.

 

 

 

 

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FYI: if you live in NYC area -- check offerup - FAT TIRE BIKES are an 'inner city' bike 'crew' thing  -- cheaper purchase options if you are willing to 'deal' sight unseen in HARLEM and BROOKLYN.

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At 60 I’m not peddling through sugar sand anymore.  Closest to 5” as you can get and drop the pressure to under 10. Aluminum frame and good salt resistant spokes and chain are worth it up front.  Fat tires makes things doable, not easy ;)

 

But they are the only way to go, plus they look so cool.  And get the lowest drop tube you can get or one of them womens things, lol

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On 5/1/2020 at 9:18 PM, tomkaz said:

Discussion is in the link I posted above. That I can recall: 

Pedals

Lower bracket

Shifters

Handle bars and grips

Seat stem and clamp

Tires

 

Weight savings was around four pounds I think. 
 

The seat was adequate so I left it stock. 
 

I would have swapped out the brakes for hydraulics if I was doing trail work and stopping on a dime was important. They work fine on the beach or sidewalk. 
 

Again, the Costco bike would have solved most of the above and comes with an alloy frame and stem. 
 

The cheapest item at bikes.com and similar were 2-3X the WalGoose. For a concept ride, I couldn’t justify. 

All of those swap outs puts you in striking distance of the cheapest framedbikes.com or bikesdirect.  The walgoose had to be about $250 and you put close to $150 in?  For another $150 you get into a better bike.  I hear you on the proof of concept idea.  I've done that too.  When the goose dies,  you'll get something better if you can justify the cost in your mind.  On a related note, I am just starting taking up golf.  I cannot believe the price of an "entry" level set of clubs.  I can barely hit the *******g ball.  No way that set will make me better....

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On 5/2/2020 at 5:41 PM, G8trwood said:

At 60 I’m not peddling through sugar sand anymore.  Closest to 5” as you can get and drop the pressure to under 10. Aluminum frame and good salt resistant spokes and chain are worth it up front.  Fat tires makes things doable, not easy ;)

yeah, if it do another, aluminum for sure. 

 

On 5/2/2020 at 5:41 PM, G8trwood said:

But they are the only way to go, plus they look so cool.  And get the lowest drop tube you can get or one of them womens things, lol

Yeah, i don't wear waders at all and it is still sometimes a chore to get the foot over the slant tube on the goose when on a sloped beach

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13 mins ago, Wheeler said:

$550 at wallyworld...

 

IMG-6190.jpg.ac4ef0be7ba7cb071ac1f28933a8928f.jpg

gas burner not very legal on many beaches, if you care....

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18 hours ago, fatbikerjoe said:

All of those swap outs puts you in striking distance of the cheapest framedbikes.com or bikesdirect.  The walgoose had to be about $250 and you put close to $150 in?  For another $150 you get into a better bike.  I hear you on the proof of concept idea.  I've done that too.  When the goose dies,  you'll get something better if you can justify the cost in your mind. 

yeah, I know. 

 

18 hours ago, fatbikerjoe said:

 

 

On a related note, I am just starting taking up golf.  I cannot believe the price of an "entry" level set of clubs.  I can barely hit the *******g ball.  No way that set will make me better....

Good luck with that. When clubs each cost the price of a mid-range fly rod, kill me first...

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Posted (edited) · Report post

On 5/1/2020 at 0:17 PM, DeepBlue85 said:

Any one have experience with these?  Curious how they actually go in sand, the firm upper beach or water line stuff.  Also if theres any one particular that stands out for the purpose..... currently looking at some mongoose models but any advice is greatly appreciated as iv lost access to a primary area.  Thanks 

Fat tire bikes are fun platforms to fish off but you should consider some things. first of all how much weight are you going to put on your bike?

 

A steel framed bike is far sturdier in terms of weight that it can hold and generally beach bikes are pretty much akin to pack mules. That said the heavier they are - all weighted down, the harder they are to pedal along the sand and it can be very tiring even going a short distance, for most people. That said I purposely went with steel for my beach bike.I also used carbon rims to keep the weight down while still being able to count on the sturdy and reliable steel frame. I also put aluminum racks on the bike.

 

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Generally speaking fat tire bikes don't perform well at all in loose sand, so you wind up riding down near the water line. Usually an hour or two above it in terms of the tideline.

 

Many of the cheaper bikes have components that just aren't suitable for beach use. 

 

I don't recommend carbon fiber bikes at all for beach riding because ultraviolet light breaks the carbon fiber down in a matter of a few years and generally it's a big waste of money because the frames begin to fail.

 

Beaches are very exposed environments and there's not a lot of cover in terms of shade. Then again if you only fish a few times a month it doesn't matter at all. But if you start liking it and get out on the sand regularly, the drawbacks with carbon fiber outweigh the positives in my opinion.

 

If you buy an aluminum framed bike you're going to have to travel light. If you can manage to do that then aluminum would be a excellent material to help keep the weight of the bike down.

 

In general I like steel framed bikes for outdoor sports  applications because most of the time I'm camping or weighted down significantly.

 

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The other huge advantage to steel is that you can repair it easily. If carbon fiber breaks or cracked you're completely out of luck and of course aluminum is one of the weaker materials out there. 

 

Where carbon fiber bikes shine is climbing and in general pedaling fast. They are exceptionally light and exceptionally uncomfortable to ride actually as well - mainly due to the seats that people choose to use on these types of bikes.

 

For fishing purposes you're going to want the biggest most comfortable seat you can get your hands on and my advice is to not listen to any bike guy tell you otherwise. Most real fishing bikes have customized seats.

 

Aluminum bikes are nice and light also and they climb hills a lot better than steel bikes do. On flat sand a lighter bike doesn't sink in as much and if you are the motor, you'll appreciate a lighter ride on the beach.

 

I don't much care about lightness, I just plow along but I'm a former college cross country runner and I ran road races until I was in my 40s so I've got a lot of leg strength and I'm still somehow in okay shape. If you're concerned at all in terms of powering the bike, you will want to either build the whole concept fairly light except for the seat or just go motorized. I will tell you that riding on sand is absolutely not easy -but again the right tires can & do make a big difference.

 

Obviously a motorized fat bike would be phenomenal providing the e-bike was made of mostly corrosion proof saltwater grade materials.

 

Not sure the industry is really there yet but if I was you and you were really curious about fat bikes, I would definitely custom make a motorized one at this point in time because the electric motors are phenomenal. I would suggest having a reputable e-bike builder custom make you one.

 

As mentioned, your tires have a lot to do with success on the sand and typical knobby mountain bike tires work like crap - so definitely buy it with the right tires on it already.

 

Just like with beach buggies, you want to be able to deflate your tires. This means taking the inner tubes out of them & building your rims up with specialized tape and then using sealant in the tire every 6 months to a year.

 

This allows you to ride with only a few pounds of pressure in the tire and the more air you take out the better the bike rides on sand. the trade off is it rides like crap on harder surfaces. I love the ride of a fat tire with an air tube in it. But unfortunately I took my inner tubes out to give me the flexibility of riding on the sand.

 

There is of course a happy medium obviously one or two pounds of pressure is not going to perform very well in the fluff so to speak, so I usually ride with between five and eight pounds in a tire but my tires are massive. (5" bad boys, too wide to fit most frames).This means you need a very reliable hand pump with you at all times because you will definitely be reinflating once you're off the sand.

 

I have done some really really long rides and another big concern is carrying enough water. once you begin loading all the essential supplies onto a bike you're going to realize you are much heavier than you wanted to be. For actual fishing applications, steel frames are probably the best choice overall.

 

Once you figure out really how you're going to use the bike that will dictate what you buy. I use mine for backwoods hunting, I camp with it constantly, I access all sorts of beaches that are completely private thanks to the bike & I ride through streets and lawns and all sorts of places under the cover of darkness.

 

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I also just take the bike out and ride the hell out of it sometimes for fun. I wound up with a customized trailer, which I built from an existing and available bike trailer and then I added a giant laundry basket on it which I purchased through a commercial site. I then had a seamstress so me a gortex liner with drainage holes for the basket & I even have a mini Coleman grill lawn chairs a pop-up umbrella you name it and that's for when I want to ride and style and go post up somewhere.

 

I'll often have between 50 and 100 pounds of gear on my bike. You can make customized rod tubes from PVC piping and attach it to the bike frame with zip ties. 

 

Transporting a fairly heavy or a fairly expensive fat bike is also a big concern. Thule racks are among the worst made racks out there I definitely don't recommend them. In fact I started laughing when I saw the rubber straps they used to attach a bike. Hell no! Do you need a secure rack that not only holds the bike safely but lets you go into a diner or make a pit stop without worrying that your bikes going to get bumped.

 

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When I would recommend would be OneUp USA made in Minnesota. By far, probably the best bike rack out there. You can get a bike on and off in 2 seconds and you can actually lock it to the rack with something other than a chinsey wire. 

 

The rack folds up out of the way it can be down in a second and you can have a bike secured on it in about literally 10 seconds either on or off. Definitely buy the proper spacers and get it all figured out which of any help on any of that stuff I can easily guide you.

 

As far as a very inexpensive fat bike just to get started - I would just save your money to be honest with you & make an investment you can use for years to come.

 

Whatever you do wind up doing you will absolutely be customizing the bike so you might as well just customize the hell out of the whole thing in my opinion. 

Edited by CaryGreene

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