codfish

Lures that imitate multiple forms of bait fish

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There is a lot of talk about "Match the hatch" why not use a lure that mimics multiple types of the food Stripers look to eat, here is a perfect example, the lure "5 inch baby squid"

Silver sides, squid, peanut bunker, all 5 inch:)  What makes your list of a cross over lure??

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Edited by codfish

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2 hours ago, ASrod said:

*bucktail*

Got to agree with you there, depending on how its tied and what trailers are used a bucktails can represent most baitfish patterns, squid, crabs, basically anything a striper might want.

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How many chartreuse or hot pink fish have you ever caught in the wild?  Probably none, because these colors are UV reactive, most fish are UV reflective because it is camouflage.  Yet, there is something in the fish brain that says eat chartreuse. 

I am just about convinced if I painted a plastic sandwich bag chartreuse and put it treble hook on it I would catch fish.  In Florida, people jig pieces of straws to catch Spanish mackerel.  There is nothing in the water there with yellow and red horizontal stripes. Were those mackerel looking for a Coca Cola?

A lot of what we do to attract fish is a bit unnatural to begin with.  

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You could also throw a minnow type bait in the hat for multiple species imitator. Could obviously be larger bait like bunker/herring, but could also imitate a sandeel or squid. 

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At times, I've caught Stripers on plastic baits such as lizards. I can't tell you what they may have looked like to the Stripers. Eels perhaps in an abstract way? I don't know. I've used many ribbontail worms, and always felt they imitated eels very well. 

 

IMO, we put too much stock in the appearance of a lure, or a fly. We can't possibly know what the fish see when they see these contraptions. We make presumptions based on what we see & believe they may represent. It only matters that the fish grab them.

 

In another discussion, the idea of selective & opportunistic feeding was mentioned. I read in a discussion on another site recently, it was mentioned about impulse reactions, nothing more than instinct,causing some fish at times to strike a fly or lure, even when they're not necessarily actively feeding. IMO, that idea has a lot of merit. 

 

It's often brought up about colors, because it's what we see and relate to. Shape, and profile, and certainly movements play as much of a roll in why fish strike anything we toss at them. Yet, we think more in term of the color.

 

I feel that "matching" is a good way to select what we use, but not sure about how far we have to go with it on any given day. As fishhappy has said above, a chartreuse sandwich bag would likely catch plenty of fish. I know for a fact that will work. A friend of mine, Capt, Norm Bartlett in MD, tied flies & jig versions of what he called "TB's", which stood for "trash bag". I had also read of a bass angler using strips of various plastic bags as lures, way back in the 70's. What do they represent? Who know,s but they have form, color & movement and they can be made very large, yet still light enough to cast.

 

What do spoons or tins imitate? Possibly many things, baitfish primarily, but we can't be 100% sure they aren't taken as something else, like a squid. Spoons are made in many sizes & shapes, and each has a different action. Some are shiny metal, some are painted, yet they still attract strikes. I've used spoons with nothing on the hook, dressed with hair or feathers and even dressed with rubber or silicone skirts. They don't change the spoon, but they do change the overall appearance, and action. 

 

Bucktails, the same question? We presume them to be baitfish, but is that really why these fish strike them?  I agree they can imitate a variety of things and only the fish know for sure what they see.

 

For a very long time, I've tried to tie flies that are generic and may imitate multiple prey, rather than trying to go specific, because IMO, it improves my chances for tossing something they will strike at, rather than constantly trying different flies to figure it out. That's certainly a good way to treat lures too. 

 

In a discussion on another site about eyes on flies or lures, a guide who said he has done a lot of diving and viewed various fish species from below the surface, said that these fish act differently when they're being selective than when they're just being opportunistic, He said that a more realistic imitation was warranted when they were being selective. I don't necessarily agree, but it does make some sense. That may also depend on the conditions and fish species. A Striper possibly reacts to the same lure or fly, differently than an Albacore might, when the conditions are the same. 

 

I know from my own fishing, that "generic" works well most of the time, as does the idea of "matching", multiple prey. Did I miss out at times, because my offerings were not specific enough? I can't answer that. If I did, so be it. 

 

I like having variety to fit as many possible scenarios as I can, but there's always going to be times/places & fish that nothing you throw will get a positive response. 

 

I like flukes & sluggos, and worms for plastics, but will also throw the various swimbaits. I also like spoons & jigs, and not always just a bucktail. Hardbaits, plugs, who knows what they might look like to these fish. If you don't use them, you may be missing out. There's really too many possibilities, but these are always a good bet to imitate something.

Edited by Jim H

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4 hours ago, fishhappy said:

How many chartreuse or hot pink fish have you ever caught in the wild?  Probably none, because these colors are UV reactive, most fish are UV reflective because it is camouflage.  Yet, there is something in the fish brain that says eat chartreuse. 

I am just about convinced if I painted a plastic sandwich bag chartreuse and put it treble hook on it I would catch fish.  In Florida, people jig pieces of straws to catch Spanish mackerel.  There is nothing in the water there with yellow and red horizontal stripes. Were those mackerel looking for a Coca Cola?

A lot of what we do to attract fish is a bit unnatural to begin with.  

Have you watched the straw as it goes through the water? Imitates rain bait pretty well. It comes down to shades in the water more than color, and reaction vs hungry. 

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