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FRONT LINE FIRST RESPONDERS LEVEL 

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Truck Drivers make it to FRONT LINE FIRST RESPONDER'S LEVEL  

 

Truck drivers make it possible for everyone else to work from home

by Salena Zito:  April 07, 2020 12:00 AM

 

SHIPPENSBURG, Pennsylvania — Chet Eby is making sure you are going to get all of the bacon you need for breakfast, or maple-glazed ham for that now-modified family Easter dinner you are going to make, or that thinly sliced prosciutto and provolone sandwich you’ve been craving. It is a Wednesday afternoon, and the 31-year-old has his young sons, Austin and Evan, with him hauling a load of piglets from Cumberland County to Iowa, one of millions of road warriors behind the wheel of a truck traveling across the country every hour of every day making sure the food and necessities you need and enjoy are available at your local grocers.

 

“I am hauling baby pigs from where they're born in Pennsylvania to the farms where they fatten them out in Iowa,” he said from his starting point. He is heading out to Iowa with his truck filled with 20-pound pigs. “So on our end of it with farmers, every eight weeks, a new litter of pigs is born, and we have to get the little ones out of the barn, the barn needs to be empty so the next batch can come.”

 

“If we don’t transport freight, the country comes to a standstill,” Eby says matter-of-factly.

 

Pigs have to go somewhere to fatten. From there, they are processed and delivered to grocery stores and butcher shops in refrigerated trucks all over the country. That is where KLLM Transport Services out of Jackson, Mississippi, comes in, whose core business is in refrigerated transportation.

 

“We have about 4,000 tractor-trailers nationwide with about 25 locations across the country,” said Jim Richards, CEO of KLLM.

 

And they haven’t stopped moving.

 

There are over 3.5 million professional truck drivers in the United States, according to the American Trucking Associations, which deliver billions of tons of freight from one place to the other every year.

 

In the weeks since the coronavirus has spread across the country, KLLM truckers are the men and women who are making sure perishable foods and pharmaceuticals are delivered across the lower 48 states and Mexico, never stopping or slowing down your ability to get what you need — despite all of the barriers, restrictions, and complications of the coronavirus.

 

Richards was hired by the company straight out of college for its management training program, which included him getting a commercial driver's license and driving across the country with a load. As a future manager, he deeply understood what the life of trucking and hauling meant. Now, he says the biggest change is people not working in the office.

 

“We've never been one that allowed very many of our employees to work remotely. And so, thank goodness that we are a very technology forward-thinking company. And that's really what has saved us,” he said. Each truck has satellite two-way communication, Richards explained. “The technology that we employ, both from a communications perspective on the trucks, as well as location, and also safety has really been a benefit for us during this time,” he said.

 

 “Obviously, we'd never foresee anything like that. But it enabled us to continue to operate. And our nondriving staff, which have never been allowed to work remotely, for the most part, we've got about 95% of them all working from home,” Richards explained.

 

Truckers have become a new wave of front-line responders in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic — starting with Eby, who gets the piglet to the farm to be fattened, and the next driver who gets the fattened pig to the butcher, and the next one who gets the refrigerated meat to the store.

 

Before the realities of this pandemic, trucks were often ignored. Their impact on our daily lives was considered an annoyance, as they chugged slowly up the winding hills of our back roads on the way to that grocery store, hospital, department store, or Amazon distribution center.

 

Never mind that they are filled with those essential things we have to have or nonessential things we thought we had to have. Too often, people mindlessly assume what they buy at Target or Walmart or Whole Foods comes from the back room, not from a farm upstate, or a factory four states away.

 

“I'm glad that our industry is finally getting a little bit of a positive spin,” said Richards. “So many times, you run up and down the highways, and all you see is plaintiff attorneys advertising, wanting to sue truckers.”

 

Richards said if you get into an accident on the highway, usually there's a truck driver who's one of the first ones there with the fire extinguisher or trying to help paramedics or first responders. “And that's just the type of people they are," Richards said. "And I think a lot of times, quite frankly, the industry can be portrayed as a bunch of outlaws or kind of a rough group of people. And I understand where some of that comes from, but at the same time, they for the most part, they've got be hard. And times like this, it really shows up.”

 

He said they are doing everything they can to keep their team safe. Richards said:

 

We've taken precautions when they are going into some of these locations and have asked the receivers not to ask the driver to get out of the cab of the truck. So basically, they pull in, back up to the doors and to the receiver, and then the receivers unload the freight. Which they've always done before. So, we're doing everything we can to keep our drivers from being exposed and putting them in dangerous situations.

The Vicksburg, Mississippi, native said that he has been astounded by the way his team has stepped up.

 

“But I will tell you this, it's been surprising to me. We measure our number of drivers on time off every day. So we know how many of them are working versus at home on time off. And our time off numbers have run lower, actually, than they did prior to the virus. I think a lot of drivers are very independent, but you won't find a group of people that loves to step up to the plate and answer the call in times of need that you will from truck drivers,” Richards explained.

 

“Every time we have a hurricane or natural disaster, it's amazing how many of our drivers are calling me wanting to know how they can go help. Can we donate product? Can they go deliver? Can we allow people to use our trailers? Or just whatever they can do to try to help out people in need. They really are a very caring group of people. They're independent, but they love helping people.” End

 

i SPENT 30 YEARS IN THE TRUCKING BUSINESS.  It's nice to see the industry recognized as our lifeline!

These Knight's of the Road will have a big hand in kicking our Economy up to Speed!   RK

Edited by RJ

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Your trailer drivers,the truck drivers the UPS, FedEx drivers ,the mechanics,engineers and the supporting staff are true professionals and without them we would be a stagnated country.

 

 

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Just now, Surf bomber said:

Your trailer drivers,the truck drivers the UPS, FedEx drivers ,the mechanics,engineers and the supporting staff are true professionals and without them we would be a stagnated country.

 

 

Virtually everything that you purchase got to you via an over the road truck.

 

Think about that.......

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Not to diminish the importance of truckers in any way, but is it really an accurate comparison to equate truckers to doctors, nurses, firemen or police?

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9 mins ago, JoeyZac said:

Not to diminish the importance of truckers in any way, but is it really an accurate comparison to equate truckers to doctors, nurses, firemen or police?

Can't eat Doctors, Nurses, firemen or police. You want to see real panic, wait until there is no food.

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1 min ago, PCstriper said:

Can't eat Doctors, Nurses, firemen or police. You want to see real panic, wait until there is no food.

 

As I said, not trying to diminish the importance of truckers in any way, just looking to question what I feel is a false equivalency.

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Just now, JoeyZac said:

Not to diminish the importance of truckers in any way, but is it really an accurate comparison to equate truckers to doctors, nurses, firemen or police?

They are delivering the products to all the sites that are belly button deep in areas loaded with Carriers of C-19 Virus. with out their dedication and willingness to work long hours in all Weather Condition put them in that category.

 

The level of those drivers is above and beyond the rest of the drivers hauling goods to unaffected delivery areas.  Joey I hope you don't think every Trucker in the nation is being look at as FIRST RESPONDER'S!

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9 mins ago, RJ said:

They are delivering the products to all the sites that are belly button deep in areas loaded with Carriers of C-19 Virus. with out their dedication and willingness to work long hours in all Weather Condition put them in that category.

 

The level of those drivers is above and beyond the rest of the drivers hauling goods to unaffected delivery areas.  Joey I hope you don't think every Trucker in the nation is being look at as FIRST RESPONDER'S!

 

Skimmed the article quick, to me it looked like they were talking about truckers in general.

 

And again, there is a difference between someone shipping goods, even if they are critically needed goods, and someone who is a "first responder."

 

I could see saying they are taking risks by going into bad area could maybe qualify them for hazard pay, but again, that's not a "first responder."

 

I work in a hospital.  I'm in  IT.  We have COVID patients in our medical wings.  I work every day on computers in those wings.  I am in areas where nurses, doctors, therapists and patients have tested positive.  I think it could be argued that my keeping the computers and medical equipment working is an "essential" task, but I am by no means a "first responder."

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I get what you are saying Joey, Doctors, Nurses and Paramedics,  EMT's are on their own level when it comes to this virus. The next level would be the Police and Firefighters still doing their jobs trying to keep law and order and public safety.  Right below them are the essential workers who are putting themselves into situations they never signed up for, unlike all those First responders above them. I give a lot of credit to all of those who are working in stores as cashiers and stock people. They are keeping things as normal as possible for all of us and putting themselves in danger of catching the virus. 

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3 mins ago, PCstriper said:

I get what you are saying Joey, Doctors, Nurses and Paramedics,  EMT's are on their own level when it comes to this virus. The next level would be the Police and Firefighters still doing their jobs trying to keep law and order and public safety.  Right below them are the essential workers who are putting themselves into situations they never signed up for, unlike all those First responders above them. I give a lot of credit to all of those who are working in stores as cashiers and stock people. They are keeping things as normal as possible for all of us and putting themselves in danger of catching the virus. 

 

Yep, we all think about doctors and nurses, and for good reason, but yeah, all the people working in the super markets, exposed to hundreds of people every day.

 

It's easy to forget about people who are exposed to this mess, but don't really seem to be in the line of fire.............. unless you think about it.

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1 min ago, JoeyZac said:

 

Yep, we all think about doctors and nurses, and for good reason, but yeah, all the people working in the super markets, exposed to hundreds of people every day.

 

It's easy to forget about people who are exposed to this mess, but don't really seem to be in the line of fire.............. unless you think about it.

That's just it, those of us who work in Hospitals or as EMT's, Cops or Firefighters know the dangers we can come across when we took our jobs, and we still do them. Those store workers never thought something like this would happen to them also the truck drivers making all those deliveries. 

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6 mins ago, PCstriper said:

That's just it, those of us who work in Hospitals or as EMT's, Cops or Firefighters know the dangers we can come across when we took our jobs, and we still do them. Those store workers never thought something like this would happen to them also the truck drivers making all those deliveries. 

 

At this point I'd rather be a truck driver than a stock boy or cashier.  Hands down.

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9 hours ago, Gotcow? said:

Virtually everything that you purchase got to you via an over the road truck.

 

Think about that.......

And many of those trucks are delivered via train where they are distributed locally, van trains (truck boxes with or without a chassis under them) are typically 10000 feet long and many are double stacked without wheels carrying twice as many.These trains can run across the country in a much shorter time than an individual truck can. Not to mention that a regular freight car can hold much more than a 53 ft trailer. 

 

Truck drivers ARE important as train track don't go everywhere trucks can, but if you want to cripple  Americas needs the rail system failing would do it quickly. 

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Try doing everything you have done for 6 weeks without electricity.

 

Without indoor plumping.

 

The powerplant maintenance tech is the most important guy on the planet.

 

Linemen.  You try fixing the busted powerline yourself.

 

Trucks cant travel without roads.  Tilcon FTW!

 

The gas station attendant in NJ is a first responder.  Meets EVERY customer iwthin 4 feet, and without gas you are SOL... even truckers.

 

 

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