The Fisherman

Farmington River Truttasaurus

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25 posts in this topic

2 hours ago, Kima said:

So far so good here. Are you doing any business now?  Our club postponed fishing until further notice.

Some clubs are placing markers 30 or so feet apart around their ponds and  only where members can fish to maintain social distancing. So have had some stockings without postponement. Been extremely busy with private pond owners. People want a few fish in their ponds to keep the kids occupied.

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That's a real nice fish. I bet there were some little fish in that pot belly. I've never fished the Farmington what is "a survivor strain brown" are they bred to hold over better? 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

8 hours ago, The Fisherman said:

Thanks everyone for the kind words. Tight lines and be safe and well!

 

Steve Culton

Great to see you're out there enjoying the Farm Steve. Perfect environment for social distancing. The river looks healthy and temps should be higher than last spring without snow melt runoff. 

Edited by SlackTideBri

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6 hours ago, Mountain Brookies said:

That's a real nice fish. I bet there were some little fish in that pot belly. I've never fished the Farmington what is "a survivor strain brown" are they bred to hold over better? 

The state goes out and shocks the river. They collect fish that are supposedly wild born in the river (good luck with that, in a river that heavily stocked).  The fish are brought back to the Burlington hatchery and spawned. They raise them for a year or two then bring them back to the Farmington TMA.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

13 hours ago, Mountain Brookies said:

That's a real nice fish. I bet there were some little fish in that pot belly. I've never fished the Farmington what is "a survivor strain brown" are they bred to hold over better? 

Cliff's Notes version: The Survivor Stain program began about 25 years ago when they noticed that many stocked browns (Cortland, Rome, and Bitterroot strains) were holding over in the Farmington. The theory was that these fish have the genetic right stuff to survive and procreate, so let's make more of them. So every September they draw down the dam release and collect fish, ideally around 100. They look for potential genetic elasticity: big, medium, small, wild and even previous generations of Survivor Strain (it's not that difficult to ID a wild or feral Farmington brown, and it's even easier to ID a Survivor Strain). Fish are taken to the hatchery and spawned. You might have a large wild hen mated with a small Survivor buck. Medium wild hen with large wild buck. Etc. Once spawned, the broodstock are returned to the river and IDed as Survivor strain: the adipose fin is clipped and a sometimes a colored elastomer is added to the left eye (there's a chart somewhere that matches colors to years, i.e. red = 2019) 

 

Survivor Strain: no adipose

AprilTruttasaurus.jpeg.6e4b96601ec9d56bba47b542941a99b4.jpeg

 

Wild: perfect fin edges and rays (not shown) and full adipose.

 

HugeFarmyBrown copy.jpeg

 

The young Survivor Strain browns are returned to the river usually after a year, and also have their adipose fins clipped; sometimes the elastomer is added, but to the right eye.

 

Hope that helps. For more information, do a search for an article I wrote called "Survivor: Farmington. Browns Built to Last."

 

Steve Culton

Edited by The Fisherman

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Thanks for filling me in Kima and Steve. I read your article Steve. It sounds like a good idea. I wish my states Fish and Game dept. would take note. 

Edited by Mountain Brookies

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It's an outstanding program. In any given year, DEEP sampling crews are finding from 30%-40+% wild browns in the Farmington. That river is an amazing resource.

 

Survivor Strain trout are stocked in other CT rivers, too, most notably the Housatonic.Thanks for reading!

 

Steve

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