pioneeratsea

self bailing hull

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Wondering what you think about leaving a boat without a self bailing hull in the water as opposed to keeping it on a trailer. If it has an auto bilge pump, does that take care of it?  I know pumps fail and batteries run down.  Would keeping the battery on the charger give you more peace of mind?  There are some great shallow water hulls out there that don't have the self bailing feature. 

Thanks for thinking about this !!!!

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It's been done for sure, everybody did it when I was young.

Are you thinking a dock, or mooring?

Will you be nearby? 

 

If you have a dock with power, put in a battery charger.

Or, if you can, put a mooring cover on it.

In any event, be close enough to check it after every rain. 

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My old Formula had a pump under the floor with a switch, worked as long as the kids put the cover on when done using it at the mooring.  If they didn't put the cover on and it rained?  The battery would go dead.  couldn't blame the pump, it was the kids fault.

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Actually, other than saltwater marina's,  you will find 90% of the boats that sit in slips year-round in lakes/rivers across the country do not have self bailing cockpits.. auto bilge pumps and covers keep the water out.. as mentioned, if you are not going to be nearby, or visiting frequently you will need to keep the batteries charged somehow.. I've kept my non-bailing  tin boats slipped for years without issue.. I've used the rule electronic sensing pumps for a while now.. they come on every few minutes,  and if there is water present it pumps till it's gone.. keeping up with water as it accumulates.. since it never has to run for very long its pretty easy on the battery... fwiw I like having 2 pumps in all my boats..they're cheap enough.. the auto, plus a manual switched one for emergencies..  

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Some marinas also do a daily check on boats.

 

I have a aluminum Deep V 16ft rowboat and never cover it.   Free bilge Rinse!

 

I got one auto bilge and one manual for a 16 gal drum baitwell.   I also purchased a solar cell for this season.

 

How infrequent are you gonna visit this boat?

 

I'm there twice a week usually.  My little 20hp outboard only cranks out 6 amps too.  Never a problen with night lights, fishing finder, and a small bait aereator.    When the stripers are really nutty late april / early march, I do swap out batteries after an all nighter.  Might be out for hours, but only use the outboard maybe 5 miles of travel.

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Your best option, imo, is if you are in a slip and have electricity, put a smart charger on board.

 

I have a two bank 15 amp charger (10/5) on the mako.

 

I have two bilge pumps.  They can run wide open forever in theory as the charger should keep them powered.

 

A side benefit is that your batteries will last MUCH longer when kept properly topped off.

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My last boat was not self bailing and whenever it rained or I was away for a week or so it was in the back of my mind. I also had the electronic bilge pump and the boat accumulated small amounts of water so it wasn't just cycling on and off.  I connected a trickle charger to the battery when rain was forecast I would plug to an extension cord. Leaving it plugged would lead to electrolysis issues so I avoided that.  At the end of season two the pump would run without water and needed to be replaced which was a real pita. So Dan I think trailer is the better option (imho) as far as the pump is concerned and it gives you mobility to fish other areas. 

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I was thinking of getting a small skiff and selling he center console, but I think I’ll just keep what I have and sacrifice the additional few inches of draft. My trailering every trip is over;  I prefer jumping in and going whenever I choose. 

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Self bailing hull is great.  but I also have a bilge pump ( Auto 3 min. )  comes on and shuts off .  you should have a bilge pump in your boat , just in case.  leak ? seal? packing.

You could be taking on water in the bilge and not even know it.  The light on the dash will light up?  nice to have.  I wouldn't be without one.

Friends boat sank in the locks, was taking on water and he didn't know it  One of the packing nuts let go.  So when he stopped in the locks the water started pouring in. 

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For any hull, including self-bailing hulls, you want two pumps and a battery charger plugged into shore power if possible.

 

Pumps fail, or clog with debris, so depending on just one will eventually get you into trouble.  Batteries go dead, so depending on one without a charger is a mistake.  Battery charges break down due to the humid environement (ask me how I learned this), so relying on the charger to do its job is a questionale strategy.  Covers can get blown loose in strong winds, or the supports can weaken and cause water to pool up on top, and perhaps cause the cover to fail, so depending on them to work is a mistake.  And self-bailing hulls, regardless of various scupper flappers, ball valves, etc., can become self-filling hulls if weight from pooled water, etc. weight down the stern enough to push the scuppers beneath the surface.

 

So you get the two batteries and charger, plug the charger in, and then go down to the boat to check after work if it rained, and during the rain if it hasn't stopped, and in the morning before work if it rained at night.  Because the best precautions can and probably will fail over time.

 

After being around boats of various sorts and setups for sity years, I learned that lesson well.

 

My current boat has a self-bailing cockpit, five pumps and four batteries, a charger and shore power.  I still go down to the marina whenever it rains.

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On 3/25/2020 at 9:24 AM, CWitek said:

For any hull, including self-bailing hulls, you want two pumps and a battery charger plugged into shore power if possible.

 

Pumps fail, or clog with debris, so depending on just one will eventually get you into trouble.  Batteries go dead, so depending on one without a charger is a mistake.  Battery charges break down due to the humid environement (ask me how I learned this), so relying on the charger to do its job is a questionale strategy.  Covers can get blown loose in strong winds, or the supports can weaken and cause water to pool up on top, and perhaps cause the cover to fail, so depending on them to work is a mistake.  And self-bailing hulls, regardless of various scupper flappers, ball valves, etc., can become self-filling hulls if weight from pooled water, etc. weight down the stern enough to push the scuppers beneath the surface.

 

So you get the two batteries and charger, plug the charger in, and then go down to the boat to check after work if it rained, and during the rain if it hasn't stopped, and in the morning before work if it rained at night.  Because the best precautions can and probably will fail over time.

 

After being around boats of various sorts and setups for sity years, I learned that lesson well.

 

My current boat has a self-bailing cockpit, five pumps and four batteries, a charger and shore power.  I still go down to the marina whenever it rains.

Having had a self-filling/ self bailing boat; I can testify that things can just screw up. Just wondering is there some kind of sensor that would hook up to your cell phone the way home monitoring systems do for your house.

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Don’t know about cell phone apps, but I put two high water alarm sensors in my current boat last year, after a bad ground wire—just installed by an electronics tech—kept my pumps from going on after the typical sloshing water while drifting for sharks began to fill my bilge.

 

Which is also why I keep manual pumps on board.

 

Redundancy is good.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I had a small boat with a 25 horse and bench seats , kept it docked , not self bailing, Had a bilge and float set up that worked well as long as you keep the gas line off the float. Came down one day after a really heavy rain to find the water inside boat over the battery. Happy my new one has scuppers and is self bailing along with bilge and float.

Edited by Flybyme

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12 hours ago, Shag said:

Having had a self-filling/ self bailing boat; I can testify that things can just screw up. Just wondering is there some kind of sensor that would hook up to your cell phone the way home monitoring systems do for your house.

They do, but as part of a larger security system for the boat I believe.  Either way, xtremely pricey

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