flydog777

Cape Cod Canal code of conduct

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I've lobstered the canal for well over 50 years.  Most times in water up to my waist, sometimes to the top of my waders. Not once have I ever fallen in, or even come close to going in. 

Common sense time folks. If you see a huge tanker, freighter, or cruise ship coming, exercise some caution, and step back until it passes and the water level returns. :)

 

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Tales of guys getting thrown in the canal, followed by their gear. Fist fights, lines cut.

How about  raising the protocol bar a bit. Simply move on and find another place to fish if there's no room. :idea:

Isn't life too short for this nonsense? After all, it's only a fish.

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8 hours ago, zak-striper said:

The most common response I see is that they keep looking forward, never making eye contact and just keep casting, pretending to not hear you. Once they cast over your line, snagging it, they acknowledge your existence because the two lines need to be untangled.

So they fish just like they drive. Never make eye contact. 

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7 hours ago, b-ware said:

Hmmmmmmmm "Super Tanker" throwing 11' of water...………………..

 It might have been a car carrier. yes the wave of water when it passed came up the water line that far.  Where I was fishing easily would have been over my head.

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Sometimes you see a half a dozen guys casting in rotation when the 7th person wanders over and squeezes in  breaking the rhythm. Things fall apart and everybody is working on a giant knot.

By the same token I have seen a small group of regulars crowd someone already fishing and forcing them to move on. 

If you're not a regular, watch, listen and learn. Even those miserable grumps like Quinn in jaws are not so bad if your cool. They'll share good info and teach you the ways of the ditch but don't jump their claim if it's reasonable size. Y

ou newbies gotta hold your ground the best you can. You need to form a phalanx against the pincer movement OR MOVE TO A LESS POPULAR SPOT WHERE YOU CAN STILL CATCH FISH BUT CAN AVOID THE THEATRICS. 

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4 mins ago, planter said:

Sometimes you see a half a dozen guys casting in rotation when the 7th person wanders over and squeezes in  breaking the rhythm. Things fall apart and everybody is working on a giant knot.

By the same token I have seen a small group of regulars crowd someone already fishing and forcing them to move on. 

If you're not a regular, watch, listen and learn. Even those miserable grumps like Quinn in jaws are not so bad if your cool. They'll share good info and teach you the ways of the ditch but don't jump their claim if it's reasonable size. Y

ou newbies gotta hold your ground the best you can. You need to form a phalanx against the pincer movement OR MOVE TO A LESS POPULAR SPOT WHERE YOU CAN STILL CATCH FISH BUT CAN AVOID THE THEATRICS. 

This makes good conversation. The good, the bad and the ugly. There is always one knucklehead that will try to blend and upset the rotation. A lot of fisherman have this lovely fishery on their bucket list. So there will always be some one "not in the know". Maybe some common sense rules of conduct could lessen the frequency of these occurrences. Just as many newbies that throw a monkey wrench into your day. There are those who know how to put the squeeze on and get their spots. Usually in a group. There is always a learning curve fishing here.

 

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The best scenario when fishing the canal is never go beyond your knees if in waders and if knee boots stay on the rocks, but still be aware of rising water when a ship of size is about to pass. I have seen times at the east end on a turning west current change where I would be standing on the dry ground at low water . A ship of size would enter from Cape Cod bay , literately suck the water away from where I was standing for a few feet and once the ship passed by watching a wall of water coming back higher then I was tall. I was not in the water as i was fishing, more like the beach after the water went down . it sort of leaves you a good impression on the affects of what is going on below the water by the propellers of the ship and that caution is still the best advise by not going into the water itself. Peace

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36 mins ago, Angler #1 said:

……. I have seen times at the east end on a turning west current change where I would be standing on the dry ground at low water . A ship of size would enter from Cape Cod bay , literately suck the water away from where I was standing for a few feet and once the ship passed by watching a wall of water coming back higher then I was tall. ...

 

Had a similar experience, however in my case I was standing on a not too well secured mussel bed.  It was one of those huge clusters of mussels that were loosely attached to the underlying base and felt spongy when walked on.  Spot was just east of the pier and across from the tanks....beautiful rip makes up on the east turn.....but treacherous footing in some places.

 

Wearing hip boots at the time......water was ankle high.  ship came thru....sucked water out....I felt the mussel bed shake...water came back in.....foundation of the mussel bed was torn from its substrate...began to move...threw me off balance…water thigh high at that point....fell to my knees....waders began to fill up.

 

Water quickly receded....I slit my waders at the knees to release the water....hobbled back to the rip rap....fortunately plug bag was strapped over my shoulder and rod never left my hand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.   

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6 mins ago, Joe G said:

 

Had a similar experience, however in my case I was standing on a not too well secured mussel bed.  It was one of those huge clusters of mussels that were loosely attached to the underlying base and felt spongy when walked on.  Spot was just east of the pier and across from the tanks....beautiful rip makes up on the east turn.....but treacherous footing in some places.

 

Wearing hip boots at the time......water was ankle high.  ship came thru....sucked water out....I felt the mussel bed shake...water came back in.....foundation of the mussel bed was torn from its substrate...began to move...threw me off balance…water thigh high at that point....fell to my knees....waders began to fill up.

 

Water quickly receded....I slit my waders at the knees to release the water....hobbled back to the rip rap....fortunately plug bag was strapped over my shoulder and rod never left my hand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I don't understand? 

 

 

 

Your canal adventure began with you wearing hip boots. However after your near tragedy, you were in waders.  

But my question is as follows. When your waders filled with water, rather than cut them open to release the water, why not just remove them? :huh:

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3 mins ago, bob_G said:

I don't understand? 

 

 

 

Your canal adventure began with you wearing hip boots. However after your near tragedy, you were in waders.  

But my question is as follows. When your waders filled with water, rather than cut them open to release the water, why not just remove them? :huh:

I'm using the term hip boots and waders interchangeably. 

If by waders, you mean chest type waders, I was not wearing chest type waders.

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2 mins ago, Joe G said:

I'm using the term hip boots and waders interchangeably. 

If by waders, you mean chest type waders, I was not wearing chest type waders.

That being the case, I'm further confused.

Why slice the hip boots open? Simply remove them, drain the water, and carry on.

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3 mins ago, bob_G said:

That being the case, I'm further confused.

Why slice the hip boots open? Simply remove them, drain the water, and carry on.

Unable to unbuckle the hip boot straps from my belt with one hand...quicker to grab the knife and slice....time was critical.

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Riding my bike once down by Split rock when a huge ship went by, sucked all the water out and when it came back in and the wave pushed me, still on my bike, all the way to Bell Rd.

 

The current was going east at the time...…………….

 

 

PS don't mix drugs and booze...……………...

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6 mins ago, b-ware said:

Riding my bike once down by Split rock when a huge ship went by, sucked all the water out and when it came back in and the wave pushed me, still on my bike, all the way to Bell Rd.

 

The current was going east at the time...…………….

 

 

PS don't mix drugs and booze...……………...

Bernie,

Imagine what might have happened if you were wearing hip boots. :laugh:

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I see now that local knowledge of these obscure situations that prove to be dangerous is important. Being aware of what is coming your way in the canal is just common sense. I got in the zone in search of a bite taking advantage of a low tide and was not paying attention. Lesson learned. Is this problem soley to the west end?

 

 

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