derekh

Two piece 9'6" or 10 foot fly rods

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There are still some manufacturers making two piece rods.  St Croix as mentioned, but also TFO still has the TFR model in 8wt, 10wt, no rod tube, that are built as two piece for strength/durability and lower cost.  TFO also still sells the signature II rod in two piece, in line weights from 2 to 6wt ($125, no tube).  Douglas makes a two piece model called the LRS - in 10' lengths with two butt caps, one longer one shorter (6 through 10wt, $150).  The Douglas rods are $189 and come with a rod sleeve but no tube.  So from 2wt to 10wt, you can still find two piece rods.  Advantage: lower cost and in some cases better durability (e.g., fewer ferrules to slip around, split or crack).  Disadvantages:  generally lower quality pre-peg materials, harder to transport and store.  I still have several two piece rods.  They get used as loaner rods, local use, in dodgy situations, or as inexpensive backups.

 

Most manufacturers are phasing out two piece rods though.  And there are very good lower cost 4 piece rods available that outperform most older 2 piece rods with some noted exceptions.  One of the best 2 piece rods I've cast was an older 5wt Sage XP.  A 9wt Sage Z axis is my buddy's go to steelhead rod, and he fishes constantly and can afford newer gear.  I learned to cast on an original series  Fenwick HMG two piece graphite 5wt.  Great short rod.  Miss it.  I own a prototype TFO TFR 8wt (from Lefty's personal rod collection) and will never sell it.

Edited by Killiefish

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Just picked up the 9'6" CTS Affinity-MX that Herb made for the Casting for Recovery foundation. It's a 8 wt, 4 piece - haven't used it yet but it feels great & looks beautiful.

Thanks Herb & SOL ...

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20 hours ago, Killiefish said:

There are still some manufacturers making two piece rods.  St Croix as mentioned, but also TFO still has the TFR model in 8wt, 10wt, no rod tube, that are built as two piece for strength/durability and lower cost.  TFO also still sells the signature II rod in two piece, in line weights from 2 to 6wt ($125, no tube).  Douglas makes a two piece model called the LRS - in 10' lengths with two butt caps, one longer one shorter (6 through 10wt, $150).  The Douglas rods are $189 and come with a rod sleeve but no tube.  So from 2wt to 10wt, you can still find two piece rods.  Advantage: lower cost and in some cases better durability (e.g., fewer ferrules to slip around, split or crack).  Disadvantages:  generally lower quality pre-peg materials, harder to transport and store.  I still have several two piece rods.  They get used as loaner rods, local use, in dodgy situations, or as inexpensive backups.

 

Most manufacturers are phasing out two piece rods though.  And there are very good lower cost 4 piece rods available that outperform most older 2 piece rods with some noted exceptions.  One of the best 2 piece rods I've cast was an older 5wt Sage XP.  A 9wt Sage Z axis is my buddy's go to steelhead rod, and he fishes constantly and can afford newer gear.  I learned to cast on an original series  Fenwick HMG two piece graphite 5wt.  Great short rod.  Miss it.  I own a prototype TFO TFR 8wt (from Lefty's personal rod collection) and will never sell it.

I fish a LOT of steelhead and it has never crossed my mind to go as heavy as a 9 wt.Is that a SH or TH?

 

In regards to the OP,Pac-Bay and Rainshadow have 2pc blanks,IM6 so it's got an old school feel you might like,not at all like today's fast action graphite.Pac-bay's Sporstmans Series has some nice blanks for what they are in 10' 8 and 9 wt.

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3 hours ago, slip n slide said:

I fish a LOT of steelhead and it has never crossed my mind to go as heavy as a 9 wt.Is that a SH or TH?

 

In regards to the OP,Pac-Bay and Rainshadow have 2pc blanks,IM6 so it's got an old school feel you might like,not at all like today's fast action graphite.Pac-bay's Sporstmans Series has some nice blanks for what they are in 10' 8 and 9 wt.

Pacific NW fiishery... He fishes wild winter steelhead but also has to be prepared for the occasional chinook salmon.  It's a single handed rod.  A nine weight here is a very typical winter steelhead rod.   A nine weight, depending on brand may also be undergunned.  You want a rod that can quickly subdue and release the fish if they are wild, non-hatchery origin fish.  Of course you could also use an 8wt if it's a beefy rod (I have a Colton 8wt that is fine for this application).  One decent backup rod I own is a 2 piece 9wt Redington RS-4, picked up for around $90.  That rod is less powerful than my Colton 8wt and barely adequate for large winter steel here.  Rod weight designations are all over the place... 

 

Our two handers on the left coast typically range from 6wt to 9wt, also depending on location, and fish species targeted or encountered.   A six weight two hander is about the minimum and doubles as a large trout spey.  A chinook spey rod is typically 9/10w.

 

I assume you fish Great Lakes primarily.

Edited by Killiefish

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3 hours ago, slip n slide said:

I fish a LOT of steelhead and it has never crossed my mind to go as heavy as a 9 wt.Is that a SH or TH?

 

In regards to the OP,Pac-Bay and Rainshadow have 2pc blanks,IM6 so it's got an old school feel you might like,not at all like today's fast action graphite.Pac-bay's Sporstmans Series has some nice blanks for what they are in 10' 8 and 9 wt.

Yep

still use lots of the 2 pc..

10’. 8wt

use use all different weights..

nice, fun

F8A2070A-ACB2-4FBC-906B-94D04F996B2A.jpeg

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1 hour ago, Killiefish said:

Pacific NW fiishery... He fishes wild winter steelhead but also has to be prepared for the occasional chinook salmon.  It's a single handed rod.  A nine weight here is a very typical winter steelhead rod.   A nine weight, depending on brand may also be undergunned.  You want a rod that can quickly subdue and release the fish if they are wild, non-hatchery origin fish.  Of course you could also use an 8wt if it's a beefy rod (I have a Colton 8wt that is fine for this application).  One decent backup rod I own is a 2 piece 9wt Redington RS-4, picked up for around $90.  That rod is less powerful than my Colton 8wt and barely adequate for large winter steel here.  Rod weight designations are all over the place... 

 

Our two handers on the left coast typically range from 6wt to 9wt, also depending on location, and fish species targeted or encountered.   A six weight two hander is about the minimum and doubles as a large trout spey.  A chinook spey rod is typically 9/10w.

 

I assume you fish Great Lakes primarily.

yep,GL...def smaller fish,although my best steelhead was close to 20lbs in  a Georgian Bay trib it was an aberration and not the norm

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