Southcoastphil

Max amount of line out with hooked striper? I want the TRUTH.

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i would estimate that the most line taken off my spool after cast was about 50 or so yds.a few years ago i had several bass that i couldn't stop fishing in the canal they all broke me off on rocks long before the spool emtied. i landed many many fish over 30lbs a few over 40 and one over 50 and none took more than 30 or so yards.i had 3 fish in the mind 30lb range that took about 50 yds,all 3 were hooked in the tail right before the fin,when they stopped they came in like a garbage bag.from the beach,i don't think more then 25 yards the big fish i have caught on the beach have gone down the beach ,not out so i could follow them,i hope that some day a bass will spool me

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2 hours ago, Southcoastphil said:

How much line was that?  How much more would you have needed?

I fill my spool with 300yds of Fireline. If that didn’t do it that fish just wasn’t coming in.

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2 hours ago, Southcoastphil said:

is that 50-75 plus cast?

Negative. VERY rarely do I ever hook up on the tail end of a cast. Always within 50-70 yards.

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2 hours ago, Southcoastphil said:

Are these figures for your total line out or should we add my assumed 80 yards for a typical cast?

Definitely totally line out.  Never seen much more than a 40 yard run.....a couple different ones sure but there’s line gained in between 

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2 hours ago, Southcoastphil said:

100 feet or yards?

Feet, give or take a couple. These are not tuna or mackerel species. If you know your equipment and fight that fish like it is going to be released green it doesn’t take much to control one. Majority of fish are caught within 30-50’ of you. 

 

You’ll get to know distance if you’ve ever fly fished. Its no different than a fly line fish, once you’ve that backing out of the reel it’s a favor to the fish. Keep them short lined and your chances of landing increases significantly. A fly line is roughly 100 feet, prior to backing. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Everyone is aware of the length of 100 yards, (actual 120 yds,  in feet wise 360’). it’s almost the length of a football field. The width is better than 150’. That gives perspective. 

 

Stand there and tell anyone here the actual length that fish ran. If you have that much line out that fish will either break off from drag generated and not from the reel but from water resistance or come in dead once retrieval is done with. 

Edited by saltfisherman

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17 hours ago, Southcoastphil said:

Does trolling count?

 

:)   It is a fishing site, so when I saw this opportunity to unspool a good yarn I had to take it.  

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17 hours ago, Southcoastphil said:

Call it 150 yards?

Phil, yeah call it 130- 150 yards out, when that happened the fish  were  eating at the end of a long cast. 

 

On the fly I have seen people get completely screwed. 

 

I have tried to spool so many ways but i never get the line capacity to match what they say online. 

 

granted, light rods that i toss small stuff with, fish breaking away from the flats and into heavy current of the channel. plus navigating around obstacles and boats when this happened with a light drag. 

 

 

Edited by fvgourami3

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50 mins ago, MaxKatt said:

 

:)   It is a fishing site, so when I saw this opportunity to unspool a good yarn I had to take it.  

And ya dunn good widd it!

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On 2/14/2020 at 5:33 PM, Southcoastphil said:

For those of us whose Google maps lack a marker for the first pillar pole, would you kindly give us that distance?

Measurements from google maps tells me its 0.3miles 

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Once you get spooled your thinking changes. I had about a hundred yards of 40lb PP out deep drifting a bucktail into an incoming moon tide. I never thought I would have 300 yds of line in the water and was not careful about my line to backing knot. I stopped that fish once and got about 20 yds back, then it took off for parts unknown. Was it a bass, I'll never know. To top it off it was my birthday, August 22nd.

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Phil,the real truth is that many many guys don't know how to fight a fish,they are afraid of losing that so called fish of a life time.many guys fish with gear that is too light to get a fish in quick,or fish with a light drag. i cant tell you how many times i have fished next to guys and landed 2 fish to there one hooking up at the same time. also saying you almost got spooled is like a badge of honor to some,to me it would be just the opposite.just remember this fishing and we all know fishermen are really good at steching the truth and story telling

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2 mins ago, l.i.fish.in.vt said:

Phil,the real truth is that many many guys don't know how to fight a fish,they are afraid of losing that so called fish of a life time.many guys fish with gear that is too light to get a fish in quick,or fish with a light drag. i cant tell you how many times i have fished next to guys and landed 2 fish to there one hooking up at the same time. also saying you almost got spooled is like a badge of honor to some,to me it would be just the opposite.just remember this fishing and we all know fishermen are really good at steching the truth and story telling

Good morning, John!

 

How are things with you in VT?  I trust you're getting lots of good skiing.

 

Although I have yet to tally the results we'e seen here, I'll estimate that the average for total amount of line out w/bass on will be 100 yards or less.  

 

I completely agree with you about gear and drags that are too light, ESPECIALLY in the ditch. 

 

One example will always stick out in my mind:  in 2017 I was fishing the ditch pretty regularly with a "crew" of 5-8 guys, always at the same spot, always at pre-dawn.  I had such a blast fishing with them because we could defend our shoreline (all 10-15 yards of it) from ditch-wits, and in the tens of thousands of casts we made I think we might have crossed lines while casting 50 times in total.  Not once did anyone lose a fish because of crossed line or bad rotation.  (Remember how we were all bailing fish that season?  We'd hook "yet another damned little one" in the mid-20# class and flip our bails open in an attempt to have the plug shaken off so we could get back to the 30s and larger.)

 

In any case, one day a guy shows up around 7:00 or 7:30 and parks himself about 20 yards upcurrent of us (with another 60+ yards of empty shoreline above him) and starts BOOMING out 120+ yard casts (we'd been slaying fish 20-30 yards out for hours).  He hooks up right off of course and starts bellowing his name and how big that fish has to be.  For whatever reason, he hardly gains any line before the fish is 10 yards from the shoreline, so this fish is about 60 yards downcurrent at this point.  Being the courteous guys that we were, all of us reeled in to let him land this fish.  But it's taking freakin *forever*!  (which meant that we could clearly see every fish he hooked, for way too long)  

 

As soon as we see that we can get back to casting, we do.  To your point about landing fish more quickly, in the time it took him to cover that last 30 yards, most of us cast, hooked and landed a fish, with one or two of my friends getting two.

 

REPEAT

 

REPEAT

 

By the fourth time, we knew where his fish would be, so we didn't hesitate to cast as soon as we knew that we wouldn't get our lines tangled with his.  

 

REPEAT, still with the booming casts, taking forever and bellowing about the size of his fish ("It's another 30-pounder!").  Since his fish were right in front of us for a good while, we could clearly see how big they were.  (To your point point about stretching, it was the only day in my life that mid-30" fish consistently weighed 30#.)

 

After that fifth time, one of us yelled up at him to make a polite suggestion.  "Hey, buddy!  The way you're fishing makes it really tough for anybody within 60 yards downstream of you to fish.  We'd all appreciate it if ya stopped casting for the mainland and started bringing them in more quickly.  Or you can move up another 50 yards.  Just so you know, we're not gonna reel in anymore when you hook up.  Choice is yours, mate."

 

He grumbled before moving away.  I didn't know it at the time, but I learned later that morning that he's a world-class distance caster, with several books/videos on distance casting and striper fishing.  I won't name names, other than to share with you that I heard the best nickname ever just yesterday afternoon.  Ron arrogant.

 

Jeez, I'm *still* laughing about that one!

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Southcoastphil said:

Good morning, John!

 

How are things with you in VT?  I trust you're getting lots of good skiing.

 

Although I have yet to tally the results we'e seen here, I'll estimate that the average for total amount of line out w/bass on will be 100 yards or less.  

 

I completely agree with you about gear and drags that are too light, ESPECIALLY in the ditch. 

 

One example will always stick out in my mind:  in 2017 I was fishing the ditch pretty regularly with a "crew" of 5-8 guys, always at the same spot, always at pre-dawn.  I had such a blast fishing with them because we could defend our shoreline (all 10-15 yards of it) from ditch-wits, and in the tens of thousands of casts we made I think we might have crossed lines while casting 50 times in total.  Not once did anyone lose a fish because of crossed line or bad rotation.  (Remember how we were all bailing fish that season?  We'd hook "yet another damned little one" in the mid-20# class and flip our bails open in an attempt to have the plug shaken off so we could get back to the 30s and larger.)

 

In any case, one day a guy shows up around 7:00 or 7:30 and parks himself about 20 yards upcurrent of us (with another 60+ yards of empty shoreline above him) and starts BOOMING out 120+ yard casts (we'd been slaying fish 20-30 yards out for hours).  He hooks up right off of course and starts bellowing his name and how big that fish has to be.  For whatever reason, he hardly gains any line before the fish is 10 yards from the shoreline, so this fish is about 60 yards downcurrent at this point.  Being the courteous guys that we were, all of us reeled in to let him land this fish.  But it's taking freakin *forever*!  (which meant that we could clearly see every fish he hooked, for way too long)  

 

As soon as we see that we can get back to casting, we do.  To your point about landing fish more quickly, in the time it took him to cover that last 30 yards, most of us cast, hooked and landed a fish, with one or two of my friends getting two.

 

REPEAT

 

REPEAT

 

By the fourth time, we knew where his fish would be, so we didn't hesitate to cast as soon as we knew that we wouldn't get our lines tangled with his.  

 

REPEAT, still with the booming casts, taking forever and bellowing about the size of his fish ("It's another 30-pounder!").  Since his fish were right in front of us for a good while, we could clearly see how big they were.  (To your point point about stretching, it was the only day in my life that mid-30" fish consistently weighed 30#.)

 

After that fifth time, one of us yelled up at him to make a polite suggestion.  "Hey, buddy!  The way you're fishing makes it really tough for anybody within 60 yards downstream of you to fish.  We'd all appreciate it if ya stopped casting for the mainland and started bringing them in more quickly.  Or you can move up another 50 yards.  Just so you know, we're not gonna reel in anymore when you hook up.  Choice is yours, mate."

 

He grumbled before moving away.  I didn't know it at the time, but I learned later that morning that he's a world-class distance caster, with several books/videos on distance casting and striper fishing.  I won't name names, other than to share with you that I heard the best nickname ever just yesterday afternoon.  Ron arrogant.

 

Jeez, I'm *still* laughing about that one!

 

 

 

Must have been a canal sharpie who called that person out !!! I can almost hear the laughter now, almost like I was there. 

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