Steve in Mass

"Wild" Atlantic Salmon?

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94 posts in this topic

8 mins ago, Steve in Mass said:

The sauce isn't at all overpowering. 

 

Came out really good.

I think its hard to overpower a strong tasting fish like salmon, either wild or farm. Even topping it with curry, the taste still comes through for me. Of course, just plain old baked salmon without extras is equally good. 

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For "cooked" salmon (I usually eat it raw), I have a very simple/fast sauce that works very well with fatty fish in general:

For each serving mix two tablespoons of sour cream (or good Greek yoghurt) with one level teaspoon of dill weed. That and some salt and you are all good!

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The only salmon I've eaten since 1976 was a from afresh caught 11 1/2 lb. female coho caught along the west bar of Barnstable Harbor by my son on our broken down little skiff as we awaited a tow from a friend.  He was casting into the outgoing tide and we thought initially he had a bluefish until getting a better look at it. 

We shared it with a neighbor and both of us declared it tasty. Prior to that I ate no salmon, having been biased by the horrible salmon served in our school in the 40's.  I know I'm missing out on some good eats but other than that fresh caught exception,  I can still taste that school lunch salmon whenever I think about trying some new.   

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On 2/11/2020 at 1:18 PM, MakoMike said:

Careful with that stuff Bob, both farmed and wild salmon carry lot of parasites that can be transmitted to humans.

 

It's clear you're not HACCP trained .. because your statement is incorrect, and in a number of notable ways. 
While wild salmon, most from the NW, may carry a parasite, it's not the parasite itself which is the potential hazard but a bacteria the parasite may carry. 
Farmed salmon, though listed as having the potential of carrying parasites, are specifically footnoted by the FDA 

Species that normally have a parasite hazard as a result of consuming infected prey apparently do not have the same parasite hazard when raised only on pelleted feed in an aquaculture operation.
 

On 2/11/2020 at 1:18 PM, MakoMike said:
  On 2/10/2020 at 11:28 PM, bob_G said:

My wife and I eat a lot of salmon. We both like it on the rare side, with my wife  closer to raw. 

When consumed like that, we find wild v farm raised to be indistinguishable.

Chow down on farm raised :)

 

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11 mins ago, Shhh....Now said:
 

It's clear you're not HACCP trained .. because your statement is incorrect, and in a number of notable ways. 
While wild salmon, most from the NW, may carry a parasite, it's not the parasite itself which is the potential hazard but a bacteria the parasite may carry. 
Farmed salmon, though listed as having the potential of carrying parasites, are specifically footnoted by the FDA 

Species that normally have a parasite hazard as a result of consuming infected prey apparently do not have the same parasite hazard when raised only on pelleted feed in an aquaculture operation.
 

Chow down on farm raised :)

 

Tell that to all the people that have to be treated for tapeworms from eating uncooked or poorly cooked wild salmon.

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33 mins ago, MakoMike said:

Tell that to all the people that have to be treated for tapeworms from eating uncooked or poorly cooked wild salmon.

More to the point ... Stop spouting off about things of which you know very little,, and inducing concerns which exist only in your mind.

With 12k posts, your name and thus your views carry an implied veracity, and in this case, a baseless one.
 

Your statement was......"both farmed and wild salmon carry lot of parasites that can be transmitted to humans"  and it is incorrect. 

Show some class and retract your statement.........or........ Present your evidence to the FDA that they can alter and amend their position.

I quoted this "
Species that normally have a parasite hazard as a result of consuming infected prey apparently do not have the same parasite hazard when raised only on pelleted feed in an aquaculture operation. from the FDA's (August, 2019)  Fish and Fishery Products Hazards and Controls Guidance

Edited by Shhh....Now

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17 mins ago, Shhh....Now said:

More to the point ... Stop spouting off about things of which you know very little,, and inducing concerns which exist only in your mind.

With 12k posts, your name and thus your views carry an implied veracity, and in this case, a baseless one.
 

Your statement was......"both farmed and wild salmon carry lot of parasites that can be transmitted to humans"  and it is incorrect. 

Show some class and retract your statement.........or........ Present your evidence to the FDA that they can alter and amend their position.

Parasites (in the larval stage) consumed in uncooked or undercooked seafood can present
a human health hazard. Among parasites, the nematodes or roundworms (
Anisakis spp., Pseudoterranova spp., Eustrongylides spp., andGnathostoma spp.), cestodes or tapeworms (Diphyllobothrium spp.), and trematodes or flukes (Chlonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis), Opisthorchis spp., Heterophyes spp., Metagonimus spp., Nanophyetes salmincola, and Paragonimus spp.) are of most concern in seafood. Most of these parasites cause mild-to-moderate illness, but severe symptoms can occur. Roundworms may embed in the intestinal wall and cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and severe abdominal pain and sometimes may penetrate the intestine. Tapeworms can cause abdominal swelling and abdominal cramps and may lead to weight loss and anemia. Intestinal flukes (Heterophyes spp., Metagonimus spp., and Nanophyetes salmincola) may cause abdominal discomfort and diarrhea. Some intestinal flukes may also migrate to and damage the heart and central nervous system. Liver flukes (C. sinensis and Opisthorchis spp.) and lung flukes (Paragonimus spp.) may migrate to the liver and lung and sometimes cause serious problems in other vital organs.

Some products that have been implicated in human parasite infection are the following: ceviche (fish and spices marinated in lime juice); lomi lomi (salmon marinated in lemon juice, onion, and tomato); poisson cru (fish marinated in citrus juice, onion, tomato, and coconut milk); herring roe; sashimi (slices of raw fish); sushi (pieces of raw fish with rice

 

and other ingredients); green herring (lightly brined herring); drunken crabs (crabs marinated in wine and pepper); cold-smoked fish; and, undercooked grilled fish. A survey of U.S. gastroenterologists confirmed that seafood-borne parasitic infections occur in the United States with sufficient frequency to recommend preventive controls during the processing of parasite-containing species of fish that are intended for raw consumption.

• Controlling parasites

The process of heating raw fish sufficiently
to kill bacterial pathogens is also sufficient to
kill parasites. Guidance concerning cooking
and pasteurizing to kill bacterial pathogens is provided in Chapters 13 (hot smoking) and
16 (cooking and pasteurization). Regulatory requirements for retorting (i.e., thermal processing of low acid canned foods) are contained in the Thermally Processed Low-Acid Foods Packaged
in Hermetically Sealed Containers regulation,
21 CFR 113 (hereinafter, the Low-Acid Canned Foods (LACF) Regulation). This guidance does not provide further information on retorting.

The effectiveness of freezing to kill parasites depends on several factors, including the temperature of the freezing process, the length of time needed to freeze the fish tissue, the length of time the fish is held frozen, the species and source of the fish, and the type of parasite present. The temperature of the freezing process, the length

of time the fish is held frozen, and the type of parasite appear to be the most important factors. For example, tapeworms are more susceptible to freezing than are roundworms. Flukes appear to be more resistant to freezing than roundworms.

 

You can read all about it here: https://www.fda.gov/media/80777/download

 

You may or may not be aware that various species of worms and flukes are not only acquired by piscene hosts through the ingestion of prey.

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1 hour ago, Shhh....Now said:
 

It's clear you're not HACCP trained .. because your statement is incorrect, and in a number of notable ways. 
While wild salmon, most from the NW, may carry a parasite, it's not the parasite itself which is the potential hazard but a bacteria the parasite may carry. 
Farmed salmon, though listed as having the potential of carrying parasites, are specifically footnoted by the FDA 

Species that normally have a parasite hazard as a result of consuming infected prey apparently do not have the same parasite hazard when raised only on pelleted feed in an aquaculture operation.
 

Chow down on farm raised :)

 

please tell us about PCB's in farmed salmon

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I quoted relevant text, concise and on point, regarding the FDA's position on the lack of presence of parasites in farmed salmon.

You quote volumes of off-topic procedure in dealing with the presence of parasites (which the FDA asserts Does Not Exist. in farmed salmon)

 

You're not HACCP trained and you're not fooling anyone with all the smoke.   

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4 mins ago, Shhh....Now said:

I quoted relevant text, concise and on point, regarding the FDA's position on the lack of presence of parasites in farmed salmon.

You quote volumes of off-topic procedure in dealing with the presence of parasites (which the FDA asserts Does Not Exist. in farmed salmon)

 

You're not HACCP trained and you're not fooling anyone with all the smoke.   

nor are you, you sound like a shill for farmed salmon.

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8 mins ago, FizzyFish said:

nor are you, you sound like a shill for farmed salmon.

Wrong 

I am HACCP trained. More than that, I've been certified to write HACCP plans for seafood handling facilities and you can check that with the office there in RI

 

.. And other than eating salmon, farmed salmon, I have no ties with any aquaculture activity, nor have I ever.

But we all know what segment of commercial fishing MakoMike shills for. 

Edited by Shhh....Now

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