Steve in Mass

"Wild" Atlantic Salmon?

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My wife and I eat a lot of salmon. We both like it on the rare side, with my wife  closer to raw. 

When consumed like that, we find wild v farm raised to be indistinguishable.

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13 hours ago, robc22 said:

The same folks that own omega protein.......My biggest angst with farmed fish is they decimate other fisheries to produce fish food for the salmon and trout they grow I/E the south american sardine fishery......https://www.pfeg.noaa.gov/research/climatemarine/cmffish/cmffishery4.html

I recently discovered this as well. I have to believe that the majority of our population has absolutely no clue about this. 

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So I recently watched a film on farm-raised fishing. It was pretty shocking to say the least, but was def worth the watch.

 

 

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On 2/9/2020 at 8:26 AM, Roccus7 said:

Farmed salmon has more fat & oils in it

This is so on the mark, as is your entire reply, including ....

 

On 2/9/2020 at 8:26 AM, Roccus7 said:

if it isn't of Canadian, Scandinavian, Icelandic or North Seaish origin, it ain't the real thing.

that, as far as answering Steve's question, the thread could have simply been closed, but then we would have missed some extra info, some laughs and I'd not get to share this gem.

 

After looking at the specials board announcing 'Baked Fresh Cod' at a well-known central Ohio seafood restaurant 55 miles east of Columbus on I-80, I asked "How fresh is fresh?" and was informed "Very very fresh. All of the cod we serve is farm raised."  

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43 mins ago, Shhh....Now said:

After looking at the specials board announcing 'Baked Fresh Cod' at a well-known central Ohio seafood restaurant 55 miles east of Columbus on I-80, I asked "How fresh is fresh?" and was informed "Very very fresh. All of the cod we serve is farm raised."  

I'll see your Midwest Cod Anecdote with another Midwest Saltwater Fish Market FAIL of my own.  I lived in a Northern Illinois suburb for far too many years and one time while perusing the fish at the fish counter of a now-defunct supermarket that shares my name, I happened to see a few mackerel that had almost expired for even crab bait, the bellies turning red, eyes sunken totally into their skulls, etc. 

 

The sign said "Fresh Mackerel" and I excoriated the person behind the counter,

 

"HOW can you call this mackerel FRESH?"

 

"It's fresh because it's never been frozen."

 

"Freezing it 3 weeks ago when it came out of the ocean would have been better than this!!!"

 

Every once in a while they would offer pleasant seafood surprises, like the time they had live, in the shell scungilli.  Grabbed those suckers right away as I was running out of cans of LaMonica...

 

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1 hour ago, RyanJ_88 said:

So I recently watched a film on farm-raised fishing. It was pretty shocking to say the least, but was def worth the watch.

 

 

Second that. Was surprised to learn even the Pacific “wild salmon” are largely raised  in hatcheries (number escapes me but more than 100) and released as fingerlings. Something like 95% of these wild fish started in a hatchery. This because many of the rivers these fish swim up are dammed for water needs. The good news was a few examples that when man butts out, the fish generally seem to come back on their own. Worthwhile watch. 

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On 2/9/2020 at 8:48 AM, Steve in Mass said:

Well, nevermind, I called them and it is indeed a typo. They have signs at the seafood counter saying so.

 

As to fat, funny, I always found wild especially sockeye, to be much "fattier" than farm raised (which fattier is to my liking.) And from what I have read, the "fats" in farm raised are not very good for you....aside from all the other drawbacks of farm raised fin fish.

Wild Pacific salmon eat a lot of shrimp,it's what makes the meat red.The store-bought salmon is eating the bunker meal from the E coast that was meant to feed stripers and such.Their meat is dyed to make it the color it is since not eating shrimp makes for pale flesh.

Sockeye,bcz it eats nothing but shrimp,macroplankton and euphasids is "shrimpy" in taste but has a low fat content so the meat tends to be dry.

Coho is my favorite day-to-day as it has good fat content,thusly,good taste,and isn't price prohibitive,like king salmon.

King salmon is awesome,almost greasy bcz there's so much fat but it's super-tasty.

Pink is kinda dry but good when it's right out of the river,once frozen it tends to get "fishy".

Sockeye is just OK,they use it to feed sled dogs,hence the moniker "dog salmon".The least oily/tasty of all the salmon,it has a "chickeny" taste.Meh.Often sold stateside as "silverbright".

There used to be a species of shrimp in the Great Lakes known as Diporeia.It was extirpated if not made extinct w/ the introduction of various invasives into the lake chain.The stocked salmonids ate them w/ gusto and their meat was very red and very good eating.I wouldn't feed it to my cat these days (she probably wouldn't eat it) as it is pale pink to white in color and very fishy/musty tasting bcz of their current diet which is heavy on alewives.Some folks still eat it by smoking it but hey,you could smoke the insole from a pr of Chuck Taylors and have something similar and the same ppl would say,"well,it's good if you smoke it".

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Posted (edited) · Report post

2 hours ago, Roccus7 said:

"It's fresh because it's never been frozen."

Strange as it might seem, when it comes to any food, that IS the legal definition of "fresh" in the US.

Scary, huh. 
What I find even scarier is.... Ohio is a swing state. ...

Edited by Shhh....Now

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4 hours ago, JTR said:

I recently discovered this as well. I have to believe that the majority of our population has absolutely no clue about this. 

Be a good use for all that by-catch that's tossed over the side everyday............

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3 mins ago, robc22 said:

Be a good use for all that by-catch that's tossed over the side everyday............

Possible use for Asian carp.

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37 mins ago, bob_G said:

Possible use for Asian carp.

That idea was put forth but the powers that be nixed the proposal. They think that using asian carp would introduce disease into our local ecosystem. Think it BS myself.........How many farmed salmon racks from all over the world have been used for lobster bait over the last 30 plus years????

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1 min ago, Wenz said:

Base on the current coronavirus situation in China, do not eat wild animals. It may be better that they are farm raised! :rav:

Do not eat wild animals, like venison, even if it were harvested in the United States, or just from China?

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1 min ago, bob_G said:

Do not eat wild animals, like venison, even if it were harvested in the United States, or just from China?

I think that those in the States should be safer. However, wild animals migrates. Especially, bats and birds, who may carry the virus to other places, I guess. 

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Did an Alaskan cruise about 15 yrs ago.  Did a fishing trip on one of the stops.  Basically just trolled a bay at the mouth of a small river, there was a hatchery that dumped out a little up that river.  It was akin to taking your kids to a pay lake.  

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