Steve in Mass

"Wild" Atlantic Salmon?

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The Market Basket ad for this week shows Wild Atlantic Salmon of $8.99/lb.

 

Salmon.png.2c8529b70e3096f9da15c9a6cc7f8ee6.png

 

In attempting to find the flavor profile compared to the various Pacific types, I also found that Wild Atlantic Salmon is hardly EVER retailed due to over-fishing, and that 99% of Atlantic Salmon sold is farm raised and most of that from Chile.

 

Now, I am pretty sure Market Basket wouldn't purposely lie, but what is your take on this?

 

Also, because of the above, I could't get an answer to my flavor question as all the comparisons were based on the farm raised version of the Atlantic salmon. So any input on that? Is is closer to Coho, Sockeye, or King?

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Would be interesting to know exactly where this comes from.  Virtually all of the large-scale wild harvest occurs off of Greenland, so if it isn't of Canadian, Scandinavian, Icelandic or North Seaish origin, it ain't the real thing.  

 

As far as flavor, it's a matter of fat IMO.  Farmed salmon has more fat & oils in it, which I find appealing, the wild fish from Alaska or what I used to catch in the Great Lakes has less fat.  I like the extra fat from a cooking perspective as its more forgiving.  If you slightly overcook farmed salmon, it's still OK.  If you slightly overcook wild salmon, might as well eat fishy cardboard. 

 

I haven't eaten enough wild salmon to be able to discern the flavor differences between species.  Some folks can tell you what species and what river, but I can only say "salmon"...

Edited by Roccus7

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12 mins ago, JTR said:

I would bet my savings that that is a mis print. I’d ask to see the packaging it comes it.

Well, nevermind, I called them and it is indeed a typo. They have signs at the seafood counter saying so.

 

As to fat, funny, I always found wild especially sockeye, to be much "fattier" than farm raised (which fattier is to my liking.) And from what I have read, the "fats" in farm raised are not very good for you....aside from all the other drawbacks of farm raised fin fish.

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On 2/9/2020 at 5:26 AM, Roccus7 said:

Would be interesting to know exactly where this comes from.  Virtually all of the large-scale wild harvest occurs off of Greenland, so if it isn't of Canadian, Scandinavian, Icelandic or North Seaish origin, it ain't the real thing.  

 

As far as flavor, it's a matter of fat IMO.  Farmed salmon has more fat & oils in it, which I find appealing, the wild fish from Alaska or what I used to catch in the Great Lakes has less fat.  I like the extra fat from a cooking perspective as its more forgiving.  If you slightly overcook farmed salmon, it's still OK.  If you slightly overcook wild salmon, might as well eat fishy cardboard. 

 

I haven't eaten enough wild salmon to be able to discern the flavor differences between species.  Some folks can tell you what species and what river, but I can only say "salmon"...

The chances that the ad was "an error or a lie" were overwhelming! So no surprise they call it an error.

 

This stuff above shows good knowledge of the subject and yes, like great beef, it is the fat in fish that gives it the rich taste that people who "know what they are looking for" find. The Copper River and Yukon Rivers produce the highest fat content kings in May/early June when they are making ready to swim upstream to spawn. They need those fat reserves because those two rivers climb the highest and longest over the course of the run before the fish get to their "final destination" (literally). 

The mention of large scale harvest of wild Atlantic salmon off Greenland is on target as well but I don't know if there is a real targeted fishery or they are simply being caught as bycatch to other fisheries.

There is a writer on the site that was running a federal Atlantic salmon hatchery and he told me the reason the program was/is a failure is they found that close to 98% of the salmon they released were being killed by nets off Greenland resulting in "less than 2% returns". I wonder if the poor netters will be able to make a living now that we aren't spawning fish for them to kill.

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A small local Latino market here has porgy marked "farmed"!  I think most of these "origin stories" need to be taken with a grain of salt. My MiL lives in Southern Oregon and always raves about the fresh wild salmon she gets year round. She's proud of never having farmed. The year round thing made me dubious, salmon has seasons. When we tasted it I knew it was farmed and she was getting scammed, but my wife wouldn't let me say it.  The place she was getting it closed and she just couldn't find the same!! LOL.

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Their is a guy here that goes by Alaskan Steve. He came to a Ditch Fling one year, and brought a fair amount of Sockeye and maybe another type that he had caught mere days before. That sockeye was by far the best salmon I ever had, both broiled and turned into gravlox.

 

Right now, previously frozen wild sockeye is available at a couple different places for $10/lb.

 

Jason, do you know the height of the sockeye season....I know at a certain time of year you can get it fresh never frozen for a short time. Since Steve brought it to me in September, I am thinking it is late summer, but maybe it depends on the area....

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If they got rid of the "Wild" description the rest could be true. Cooke Aquaculture raises salmon in Maine. After spending their first 18 months in an inland hatchery, their final 18 months are spent in ocean pens like this:

 

Cooke1-720x480.jpg

 

Still a farmed product obviously. 

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3 hours ago, Steve in Mass said:

Their is a guy here that goes by Alaskan Steve. He came to a Ditch Fling one year, and brought a fair amount of Sockeye and maybe another type that he had caught mere days before. That sockeye was by far the best salmon I ever had, both broiled and turned into gravlox.

 

Right now, previously frozen wild sockeye is available at a couple different places for $10/lb.

 

Jason, do you know the height of the sockeye season....I know at a certain time of year you can get it fresh never frozen for a short time. Since Steve brought it to me in September, I am thinking it is late summer, but maybe it depends on the area....

It's all location dependent in AK. For example, the Kenai/Russian River sockeye run is actually two runs, first in May to early June and the 2nd in mid to late July. Those caught in the open ocean from boats may have somewhat different timing. 

 

Not sure when the Bristol Bay runs happen, but the timing could very well be different. 

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I know Steve has a boat. The reason he was here was for traps, I think shrimp traps, as I remember him posting pictures of his shrimp catch. The timing was such that he could make the side trip to the Ditch Fling.

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3 hours ago, Eagles Dare said:

If they got rid of the "Wild" description the rest could be true. Cooke Aquaculture raises salmon in Maine. After spending their first 18 months in an inland hatchery, their final 18 months are spent in ocean pens like this:

 

Cooke1-720x480.jpg

 

Still a farmed product obviously. 

The same folks that own omega protein.......My biggest angst with farmed fish is they decimate other fisheries to produce fish food for the salmon and trout they grow I/E the south american sardine fishery......https://www.pfeg.noaa.gov/research/climatemarine/cmffish/cmffishery4.html

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4 hours ago, Steve in Mass said:

 

 

Jason, do you know the height of the sockeye season....I know at a certain time of year you can get it fresh never frozen for a short time. Since Steve brought it to me in September, I am thinking it is late summer, but maybe it depends on the area....

I know little about sockeyes other than I have never had "the good stuff". There must be something to it though.

It looks like downing has a handle on things here in the sockeye dept....

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