fishweewee

*New coronavirus - it's pretty bad.

Rate this topic

18,000 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, Sandflee said:

Captain MicroChip is getting pissed

 

Bill Gates: America Offers The Most Worthless COVID-19 Test Results In The World

 

Does he followup to say what is worthless? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Surf Hunter said:

 

Does he followup to say what is worthless? 

It's about excessive turnaround times for testing. From The Hill


...Microsoft founder Bill Gates on Sunday lamented the U.S.'s coronavirus "testing insanity," which he said had caused the country to fall behind the rest of the world, much of which has begun reopening after flattening infection growth.

“A variety of early missteps by the U.S. and then the political atmosphere meant that we didn’t get our testing going,” Gates said Sunday on CNN’s “Fareed Zakaria GPS.” “It’s nonsense that any sort of travel ban we did was at all beneficial. That doesn’t pass the common sense test ... and now we’ve executed our lockdowns nationwide with less fidelity than other countries.”

ADVERTISING

Commercial labs, he said, have left customers struggling with long waits, while “very wealthy people have access to these quick-turnaround tests.”

“It’s mind-blowing that you can’t get the government to improve the testing because they just want to say how great it is,” he continued. “I’ve said to them, look, have a [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] website that prioritizes who gets tested. Don’t reimburse any test where the result goes back after three days. You’re paying billions of dollars in this very inequitable way to get the most worthless testing results in the world.”

“No other country has the testing insanity because they won’t talk about fixing it, because they think they need to just keep acting like they’ve done a competent job,” he added.

Without sufficiently rapid testing, Gates continued, people with the virus may not be able to self-isolate in time to contain the infection. He added that he believes a vaccine will likely be developed by the end of 2020 or within the first half of 2021....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lab Corp is offering free antibody testing using Roche's Elecsys diagnostic.

 

This is a test you can get at Walgreens, I think.  This test is 99.8% accurate - if you have antibodies to detect.

 

https://ir.labcorp.com/news-releases/news-release-details/labcorp-will-perform-antibody-test-no-charge-accelerate-covid-19

 

LabCorp Will Perform Antibody Test at No Charge to Accelerate COVID-19 Blood Plasma Donation

No Charge Program Uses High-Affinity Test to Detect SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies

 

BURLINGTON, N.C.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Aug. 11, 2020-- LabCorp (NYSE: LH), a leading global life sciences company that is deeply integrated in guiding patient care, today announced details of a no charge antibody testing program in response to federal health authorities’ request to increase donations of COVID-19 blood plasma. Plasma with COVID-19 antibodies may be helpful when treating patients with an active COVID-19 infection and is being evaluated as a possible treatment.

 

Beginning today for the next three months, LabCorp will perform the high-affinity antibody test at no charge to patients, insurance companies, or the government. When patients are receiving other medically necessary blood tests as part of a medically necessary exam or treatment, this program allows providers to add the SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies Test to the same order at no charge. The no-charge high-affinity antibody testing program will use only the Roche Elecsys® Anti-SARS-CoV-2 and does not apply to other COVID-19 antibody tests, such as the IgG test.

 

Patients will be able to access their results through the LabCorp Patient™ portal and through their doctor. Result data from the antibody testing program will also be reported to the CDC and state public health agencies to further support COVID-19 surveillance and response efforts.

 

Individuals who have tested positive for COVID-19 and have not experienced symptoms for at least two weeks, or who have been confirmed to have antibodies to the virus are likely candidates for plasma donation. Many people who have had COVID-19 do not experience symptoms and may be unaware they have antibodies that can help other patients. The antibody test performed by LabCorp can help determine if an individual has been exposed to the virus by detecting antibodies in the blood. Antibodies comprise part of the immune response to the virus.

 

Patients who test positive for COVID-19 antibodies are encouraged to donate their blood plasma. Donating plasma does not affect the donor’s immunity, as their body will continue to produce antibodies. More information can be found about plasma donation at TheFightIsInUs.org.

 

Adam Schechter, chairman and CEO of LabCorp, said: “Many people have antibodies and are unaware that they could potentially use them to help save lives. LabCorp is offering antibody tests at no charge through a patient’s doctor to make it easier for more people to know if they should consider giving plasma. If you have antibodies and donate your plasma, you are helping the fight against the pandemic.”

 

For more information on antibody tests and LabCorp’s diagnostic COVID-19 testing options, as well as information on how to get involved, go to our website. Patients interested in donating plasma should visit TheFightIsInUs.org. The website can help check eligibility criteria and connect patients directly to plasma and blood donation centers nearby.

For Healthcare Providers

 

Under this program, providers can order the high-affinity antibody test that is based on an in-solution double-antigen sandwich format and can detect antibodies to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The test will be performed at no charge for the next three months. Antibodies could signal whether a person has already been infected and potentially developed immunity to the virus. LabCorp’s antibody test uses the Roche Elecsys® Anti-SARS-CoV-2 platform, has 99.8 percent specificity and shows no cross-reactivity to the common cold, HIV and other coronaviruses. This means it can lower the chance of false positives due to the detection of similar antibodies that may be present in an individual. The Anti-SARS-CoV-2 test detected antibodies with 100% sensitivity in samples taken 14 days after a PCR-confirmed infection. Please note, the no-charge antibody testing program includes the Roche Elecsys® Anti-SARS-CoV-2 and does not apply to specific antibody tests, such as the IgG test.

 

Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) Status

 

The Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 test has not been FDA cleared or approved. It has been authorized by FDA under an EUA for use by authorized laboratories. This test has been authorized only for detecting the presence of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, not for any other viruses or pathogens. It is only authorized for the duration of the declaration that circumstances exist justifying the authorization of emergency use of in vitro diagnostics for detection and/or diagnosis of COVID-19 under Section 564(b)(1) of the Act, 21 U.S.C. § 360bbb-3(b)(1), unless the authorization is terminated or revoked sooner.

 

*

Edited by TimS
removed the 'about' stuff with URLs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some fresh commentary from a prominent former government official.  Like, really really fresh.

 

-The COVID-19 pandemic has woken up the biowarfare community in the US.  While SARS-CoV-2 is most likely naturally occurring, it has provided bioterrorist wannabes a template on how to be an asymmetric threat.  

 

-Political considerations.  The federal gov't response to COVID-19 has been criticized, but this criticism can't all be leveled at the US gov't; this is in part due to our federal system.

 

-Americans don't like being told what to do.

 

-Conservative politicians at the federal level have given leeway to states to manage this crisis.

 

-You can't compare Europe and the United States; the level of interstate travel here in the US is far freer than the EU.

 

-Trump won't invoke DPA to force the drug manufacturers to manufacture therapeutic antibodies

 

-Officially, the FDA is looking for 50% vaccine efficacy (it has to be 50% effective in preventing severe disease).  This number was put out there to take political pressure off of the FDA.

 

-Unofficially, if a vaccine is really safe, 40% efficacy could be acceptable.  Last year's flu shot was well below 50% effective.

 

-Initial vaccine availability this fall (if trials are successful) will likely be distributed to select groups: for example, frontline healthcare workers, first responders, and elderly.

 

-The rest of the country gets the vaccine after January 1.  

 

-This could change - Astra Zeneca is working on AZD1222 in conjunction with Oxford University; in the UK approval could come as early as September, which would put a great deal of pressure on FDA to provide Emergency Use Authorization for the three leading vaccine candidates (BNT162b, mRNA-1273, AZD1222) a little earlier.

Edited by fishweewee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My parents just got over the covid. Their main symptoms were tiredness, low grade fever, and a cough. Dad's 70, mom's in her mid-60s, and both of them have had health problems in the past few years.

 

On the other hand, one of dad's friends is hospitalized with double pneumonia and the wu-flu. He has a bout of pneumonia every couple of years, and I think the virus just compounded a bad situation.

 

It's an interesting virus 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So we've known there's innate immunity in the population since the Diamond Princess debacle. Two people in the same room, One gets it and one is negative. If we go with the 2 million dead theory, that's impossible.

 

Quote

Why does COVID-19 strike some and not others? Fauci sees an answer in new study

By Belleville News-Democrat

 

Should you get tested for coronavirus antibodies? A doctor weighs in.

Health care professionals say antibody tests, or serological tests, are still unreliable, and might give you a false sense of security. A medical professional weighs in on the pros and cons of getting the test.

Up Next

Watch as Columbus educator learns he won national LifeChanger of the Year award

Health care professionals say antibody tests, or serological tests, are still unreliable, and might give you a false sense of security. A medical professional weighs in on the pros and cons of getting the test. By Belleville News-Democrat

WASHINGTON

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert, said a new study could explain the extraordinary range that people experience with the novel coronavirus, from having no symptoms at all or a mild case to hospitalization or death.

The discovery, which found potential signs of immunity in people who had previously been exposed to other types of coronavirus, could also expand the hunt for a long-lasting COVID-19 vaccine.

Fauci and other scientists said the study published in Science this month held promising findings for understanding why some individuals exposed to COVID-19 for the first time have a modest reaction to the virus.

The study found that the immune systems of roughly half of its subjects appeared to remember past exposure to other, prevalent coronaviruses, including variants of the common cold, equipping them to respond more quickly to a COVID-19 infection once it appeared.

The findings also offer new insights that could help in developing a vaccine by looking at T cells which help fight the virus.

Currently, all major candidates for a coronavirus vaccine undergoing clinical trials focus on harnessing a single antibody protein that can neutralize the virus.

‘ONE-TWO PUNCH’

Since the coronavirus outbreak began, scientists including Fauci have struggled with the question of why the novel coronavirus hits some people so hard and leaves others unscathed.

“One of the things that I don’t think has been emphasized very much at all during the attempt to address, scientifically, the COVID-19 outbreak, and vaccine development and testing, is that we’ve been focusing very exclusively on the antibody test,” Fauci told McClatchy in a recent interview. “There’s another equally important component of the immune system.”

The study, funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases which Fauci heads, is one of the first to identify T cell “cross reactivity” in individuals who have previously been exposed to one of the four endemic coronavirus strains, SARS or MERS.

Cells known as “T cells,” which originate in the thymus, serve as a secondary line of defense in the immune system once antibodies have failed or faded away.

“If you look at it metaphorically as an army with different levels of defense, the antibodies prevent the virus from getting in. So that’s kind of like the first line of defense,” Fauci explained. “For those viruses that do escape and infect some cells, the T cells come in and kill the cells that are infected or block them.”

The T cells of individuals who took part in the study recognized the novel coronavirus when it was introduced to their immune systems for the first time.

Angela Rasmussen, a virologist at Columbia University, also explained the immune system in military terms, likening antibodies to infantry and T cells to cavalry.

“None of our soldiers have been trained before this,” Rasmussen said. “But the T cell finding suggests that, maybe the cavalry actually is prepared for this virus. Maybe they already know a little bit about how to fight it. And maybe that’s helping the overall army stave off the invading virus.”

Rasmussen cautioned against overstating the findings of the study, noting that the level of protection among those with T cell memory from other coronaviruses remains unknown. But she nevertheless celebrated the findings.

“It’s a piece of good news, scientifically, because otherwise we’re completely naive to this virus and it’s completely brand new,” Rasmussen said. “If there’s anything that can give us an edge in fighting it, even within our own bodies and immune systems, that to me is great news and is very promising.”

Fauci noted that, while T cells last much longer than antibodies, they do not last forever. The more recently an individual was infected with another type of coronavirus, the greater likelihood of some protection from COVID-19.

It may explain the vast differences within older age groups, where scientists have tracked both asymptomatic cases as well as deaths in large numbers.

While one elderly individual might have been exposed to a common coronavirus within the past few years, another may not have had that exposure for decades – and not have the T cell memory that might otherwise provide protection.

“It’s sort of like a one-two punch,” Fauci said. “It’s conceivable that the T cells that you’ve made in response a couple of years ago — three, four, five years ago — when you were exposed to a relatively benign coronavirus that causes the common cold, could actually hang around, and when you’re exposed to the SARS-Coronavirus-2, could have some degree of protection,” he said, referring to the novel coronavirus.

GLOBAL LESSONS

Dr. Shane Crotty, a virologist at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology and senior author on the Science study, said in an interview that the findings could mean that individuals with T cell memory from common colds are having less severe responses to COVID-19 exposure, with their immune systems responding to the new infection more quickly.

“At least part of that immune memory is from people’s immune systems seeing common cold coronaviruses before,” Crotty said. “Most people have had those four common cold coronaviruses some time in their life, and about half of people have immune memory that cross-reacts between those common cold coronaviruses and this new coronavirus.”

The initial findings on T cell memory are already helping global leaders in public health better understand why some regions of the world have been hit harder by the COVID-19 pandemic than others.

Bill Gates, co-founder of Microsoft and of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, told CNN over the weekend that “related coronavirus exposure” has begun to explain the regional discrepancies.

“Within a few months we’ll really understand this,” Gates said. He pointed out that, in Southeast Asia, the prevalence of coronavirus-carrying bats might have increased T cell immunity among the human population. “They probably had this cross protection that meant the spread of the disease was not as strong there,” he said.

But the overall impact of these findings still requires greater research, Crotty said.

“There’s no direct evidence of an effect of these cells on disease severity,” Crotty said, “but we’ve taken the critical steps along the way to test that – showing that these cells exist, and now showing that these cells are not all the same in people, and that, definitely, some of these have memories from exposure to the common cold.”

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Coronaviruses, including the newest one, are named for the spikes that cover their outer surface like a crown, or corona in Latin. Using those club-shaped spikes, the virus latches on to the outer wall of a human cell, invades it and replicates, creating viruses to hijack more cells. (NIAID-RML via AP) AP

 

Edited by metaliczombi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, metaliczombi said:

So we've known there's innate immunity in the population since the Diamond Princess debacle. Two people in the same room, One gets it and one is negative. If we go with the 2 million dead theory, that's impossible.

 

 

 

A co-worker's daughter tested positive, her husband negative.

Talking to a lady who,works in shop rite, she tested positive but the rest of her family never had so much as a sniffle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, mwhitt80 said:

My parents just got over the covid. Their main symptoms were tiredness, low grade fever, and a cough. Dad's 70, mom's in her mid-60s, and both of them have had health problems in the past few years.

 

On the other hand, one of dad's friends is hospitalized with double pneumonia and the wu-flu. He has a bout of pneumonia every couple of years, and I think the virus just compounded a bad situation.

 

It's an interesting virus 

Glad they're on the mend!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I guess it's official now.

 

So, just a reminder that 1918 Spanish Flu was really China flu..

 

https://www.upi.com/Health_News/2020/08/13/COVID-19-deaths-in-NYC-comparable-to-1918-1919-flu-pandemic/8261597325123/

 

COVID-19 deaths in NYC 'comparable' to 1918-1919 flu pandemic


ByBrian P. Dunleavy

 

Aug. 13 (UPI) -- Deaths from COVID-19 in New York City during the first two months of the outbreak were "remarkably comparable" to those seen in the city at the height of the 1918-1919 flu pandemic, according to an analysis published Thursday by JAMA Network Open.

 

"Excess deaths" in the city in the first two months of the new coronavirus outbreak were about 70% as high as those recorded during the peak of the 1918-1919 flu pandemic, likely because of population growth, the researchers said.

 

While some have suggested the 1918-1919 flu pandemic was far worse than the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, researchers said that deaths for the two are comparable. But without modern medicine, the new coronavirus likely would be killing far more people.

 

The city reported more than 33,000 total deaths from all causes between March 11 and May 11 -- for a death rate of 202 deaths per 100,000 people in the general population.

 

The death rate for New York City during the height of the 1918-1919 flu pandemic -- October and November of 1918 -- was 287 deaths per 100,000 people in the general population, researchers said.

 

"These crises caused death rates along the same order of magnitude," study co-author Dr. Jeremy Faust told UPI.

 

"They were remarkably comparable in their effects on death rates in New York City in the time periods we assessed," said Faust, an emergency medicine physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. "I only hope what we had in March and April [with COVID-19] was the worst of it."

 

New York City has an estimated 8.28 million residents in 2020, compared with population of 5.5 million in 1918, Faust and his colleagues said.

 

Through Thursday, the city reported more than 225,000 cases of COVID-19, with more than 22,000 deaths linked to the virus, according to New York City's health department. That makes it the hardest-hit community in the country in terms of total deaths.

 

More than 5.2 million Americans have been infected with the virus, and nearly 170,000 have died, according to the latest figures from Johns Hopkins University.

 

An estimated 675,000 Americans died in the 1918-1919 flu pandemic, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

However, "excess deaths" -- the number of deaths reported during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with a "normal" year -- could provide a more accurate picture of the virus' impact, researchers have suggested.

 

For their analysis, Faust and his colleagues analyzed CDC death statistics for both pandemics, comparing them to population and death figures from the U.S. Census Bureau.

 

The researchers then compared figures from March 11 through May 11 of this year -- the first 61 days of the COVID-19 outbreak in New York City -- to the worst 61 days of the 1918-1919 flu pandemic in New York, October and November 1918.

 

New York City reported 33,465 deaths between March 11 and May 11 of this year, compared to 31,589 deaths in October and November 1918, the researchers said.

 

The death rate for the city in the years before the 1918-1919 pandemic was roughly 100 per 100,000 people, the researchers said.

 

New York City's death rate in March through May of this year -- 202 deaths per 100,000 people -- exceeded the "normal" death rate for the same period in 2018 and 2019 by roughly 150 deaths per 100,000.

 

In 2018 and 2019, the death rate for that same two-month period was 50 deaths per 100,000 people, they said.

 

The 1918 flu death rate of 287 deaths per 100,000 exceeded the normal death rate at that time by 187 deaths per 100,000, the researchers said.

 

The city's higher population in 2020 accounts for the lower rate of deaths from COVID-19, they said.

 

In addition, enhancements in medical care -- including intensive care units, mechanical ventilators and drugs like steroids -- "gives us advantages that our predecessors did not have," Faust said.

 

"We can also save lives caused by secondary bacterial infections that respond to antibiotics that they did not have 100 years ago," he said. "If it were not for that, it could be that COVID-19 is a more lethal virus than 1918 was."

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, MikeMc said:

 

A co-worker's daughter tested positive, her husband negative.

Talking to a lady who,works in shop rite, she tested positive but the rest of her family never had so much as a sniffle.

A co-worker has had 3 people close to him test positive on 3 different occasions and he's tested negative each time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.