VitaminDee

Fishing Waikiki, recommendations?

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If you can take a day , fly over to Molokai, quick flight and fish with Capt. Clayton Ching on the Hallelujah Ho. He has a flats skiff and the bonefishing there is world class with minimal pressure, some true LARGE are possible. He also has a 25 foot cat that he uses for ulua popping , they call is whipping. Have done really with him , great captain and a blast to fish with. Also peacock bass in Kaneohe.

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4 hours ago, VitaminDee said:

Just watched some slide baiting videos...what a weird technique, Basically casting a heavy sinker to anchor and sliding on bait after.. What # test do you think most of these guys are using? All the fish seem to be only about palm size. Hopefully the gear i bring will handle all types of fishing on the island. 

First, I want to correct my first post. The ulua slide-baiting is done with mono, 60-80 lb. test, NOT braid. I wrote the exact opposite of what I meant to say. Go figure. The islands are lumps of lava and the bottom is one sharp edge after another. Mono is cheaper to replace when it's cut up.

 

I had a 24-hr. surf trip with a guide for slide baiting on Maui, years ago; David Cohen, a transplanted Texan, doing business at the time as Off-Road Shore Fishing Adventures. We had one runoff that didn't turn into a fish. He grills a mean steak on the beach, fish or not, it was a lot of fun.

 

Small trevally are called papio, which the locals pronounce puh-PEE-oh, not PAY-pee-oh, as the dictionary markings indicate.They get caught in all kinds of ways.

They're good eating, unusual in the jack family (the trevallys are jacks) and they aren't often released.

 

I wouldn't discourage anyone from bringing their choice of toys, but slide baiting requires local knowledge as well as specialized tackle. A spinning rod with a very fast-retrieve reel is very popular, and the retrieve of choice is usually fast, faster, or superfast. Locals joke that haole can't fish because small fish are super line-shy and insist on very small baits with very, very small hooks.  We tourists bring what we're used to.

 

Along with that spinning outfit, I would bring lots of fluorocarbon.

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another thing to keep in mind is that a lot of the reef fish are vegetarians, so fish based lures aren't going to work. The fact that you see a lot of fish doesn't mean you can catch them. If you get really frustrated you can fish a frozen pea on a number 1/0 hook and maybe get bit. Of the vegetarians I think parrot fish put up the best fight.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

23 hours ago, MakoMike said:

another thing to keep in mind is that a lot of the reef fish are vegetarians, so fish based lures aren't going to work. The fact that you see a lot of fish doesn't mean you can catch them. If you get really frustrated you can fish a frozen pea on a number 1/0 hook and maybe get bit. Of the vegetarians I think parrot fish put up the best fight.

What are some tips when targeting fish that are vegan? 1/0- 4/0 hooks with vegetation on it?

Would kastmasters and slim profile diamond jigs be effective?

Edited by VitaminDee

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15 mins ago, VitaminDee said:

What are some tips when targeting fish that are vegan? 1/0- 4/0 hooks with vegetation on it?

Would kastmasters and slim profile diamond jigs be effective?

Small hooks, most of them have small mouths, 1/0 should probably be the biggest hook. Frozen peas work and are readily available. 

 

Cast masters and low profile diamonds will catch fish, but not the vegan ones. You can get a lot of small flashy tins, in 1/4 and 1/8 and 1/2 once in Walmart in the Ala Moana plaza. You'll need lots, the lava eats lures like you wouldn't believe.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I've only been to Maui, but from personal experience and research, Hawaii shore based fishing isn't great. Except for a few species of jacks, and maybe a cuda, the nearshore species mostly consists of herbivores. I fished some spots that I went snorkeling at that were filled with life, but they had no interest in any of my offerings. I had a lot more fun in the water than I did fishing, and it was still my favorite destination I've ever visited.

 

I talked to a local about slide baiting, he certainly had a few big Ulua to his name, but he also said he skunks more often than not. I'm sure there are some hot spots around, and maybe there is better shore based fishing on the other islands.

Edited by C.Robin

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I’m taking and a trip to Hawaii this summer and have been doing some research into fishing there. It doesn’t look very great. Mostly small fish and some strange local fishing techniques. There are peacock bass in some of the lakes which could be fun. It seems like that is by guide only though.  I’ve watched a few youtube videos where people will fish all day on a remote beach for a couple tiny fish. I’m debating on whether I should even bring gear with me. 

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1 hour ago, z-man said:

I’m taking and a trip to Hawaii this summer and have been doing some research into fishing there. It doesn’t look very great. Mostly small fish and some strange local fishing techniques. There are peacock bass in some of the lakes which could be fun. It seems like that is by guide only though.  I’ve watched a few youtube videos where people will fish all day on a remote beach for a couple tiny fish. I’m debating on whether I should even bring gear with me. 

As of right now im on the same boat. Watching countless videos on youtube, talking to you guys and on Facebook groups and they all give the same info. Might just bite the bullet and go on a Shared Charter.

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1 hour ago, z-man said:

I’m taking and a trip to Hawaii this summer and have been doing some research into fishing there. It doesn’t look very great. Mostly small fish and some strange local fishing techniques. There are peacock bass in some of the lakes which could be fun. It seems like that is by guide only though.  I’ve watched a few youtube videos where people will fish all day on a remote beach for a couple tiny fish. I’m debating on whether I should even bring gear with me. 

shared charter if you want to just get out, but other than that if it was me and I live here, I would just leave my stuff at home!

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10 mins ago, quan808 said:

shared charter if you want to just get out, but other than that if it was me and I live here, I would just leave my stuff at home!

Do you have any recommendations on which charters to look at? I was thinking of going on the Whipsaw.

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If you have Korkers, or other studded footwear, bring them, but don't wade, at all, ever, under any circumstance, on the windward side of the islands. The Honolulu ME's office processes a crop of tourists every winter who think they're Duke Kamanahoa (?) and swim or surf on the north and west sides of Oahu.

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3 hours ago, VitaminDee said:

What are some tips when targeting fish that are vegan? 1/0- 4/0 hooks with vegetation on it?

Would kastmasters and slim profile diamond jigs be effective?

Vegans are very insistent on local produce and hate anything not GMO-free. Only GMO-free baits are acceptable. Avoid not only meat baits but dairy and eggs as well.

 

Quan808, what about Gulp! and similar synthetic scented baits? Any use on the islands?

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2 hours ago, BrianBM said:

Vegans are very insistent on local produce and hate anything not GMO-free. Only GMO-free baits are acceptable. Avoid not only meat baits but dairy and eggs as well.

 

Quan808, what about Gulp! and similar synthetic scented baits? Any use on the islands?

I do use Gulp when I fish in Texas, but never even tried it here. Use small spoons and curly tails in 1/4 to 1/2 oz for barracuda, papio(small jacks less than 10lbs), stickfish. Those lures have been dry for like 10 years now, rather put my time in where I can catch a lot of fish!

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2 hours ago, BrianBM said:

If you have Korkers, or other studded footwear, bring them, but don't wade, at all, ever, under any circumstance, on the windward side of the islands. The Honolulu ME's office processes a crop of tourists every winter who think they're Duke Kamanahoa (?) and swim or surf on the north and west sides of Oahu.

What’s the reason? Sharp rocks or big waves?

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2 hours ago, BrianBM said:

Vegans are very insistent on local produce and hate anything not GMO-free. Only GMO-free baits are acceptable. Avoid not only meat baits but dairy and eggs as well.

 

Quan808, what about Gulp! and similar synthetic scented baits? Any use on the islands?

Vegan fish?  Are there any other fish on the islands with dietary restrictions?  Any gluten free fish or paleo diet fish?

:point:

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