slip n slide

help on skagit

Rate this topic

45 posts in this topic

I've got two rods rated for 6wt,a SH 11' switch and a 12/12' spey and I'm looking to get a skagit line for them.Can the same line work for both and what grain wt would be suitable? I've looked around and there is considerable variation in the recommended gr wt for the two in question going from 300- 375 gr.Opinions or experience....?

I'm looking at the RIO, SA and OPST trout spey integrated lines...heard good things about Wulff ambush but that bright line would scare the scales off the fish in some of the clear waters I fish,at best a swing or two before every fish in the pool was on alert.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Slip n Slide,

  Where are you located?  The final grain will be dependent on your casting skill and terminal tackle.  I would not be surprised if the 12 1/2' spey took a heavier line than the switch.  If you are looking at a skagit head with a non integrated running line you might want to ring up Steve Godshell.  He most likely knows what line to use for both rods. He can build you a custom head for about the same money as the off the shelf stuff

Finally I would not worry about the line color.  Fish don't care.  They can easily see mono so any color of fly line will be seen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on whether that 6wt switch rod is rated for single hand lines or two hand lines.  A typical 12' to 12'6"  spey rod correctly rated for spey is going to want ~420g plus tips.  My guess is that the switch rod needs 300g to 350g.  That's not completely  insignificant. 

Edited by Killiefish

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Slip

 

The spec you give for the 12 foot rod is unclear to me.

 

As Killie has asked is the line rating for the 6 wt a single hand line or a two hand line. Very different.

 

So called Skagit casting which is really water anchored casting is easier to learn that airborne anchors or spicy cast.

 

Air borne or touch and go make a lot less noise on the water than rooster tail,skagit.

 

Single spey is hard but a great cast once you have it down.

 

When I do get over to,fish  steel  with you I aim to useboth  two hand and single.

 

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Killiefish said:

Depends on whether that 6wt switch rod is rated for single hand lines or two hand lines.  A typical 12' to 12'6"  spey rod correctly rated for spey is going to want ~420g plus tips.  My guess is that the switch rod needs 300g to 350g.  That's not completely  insignificant. 

the 11' switch casts OH w/ a 300-350 well as does the 12 1/2' rod although the latter seems to have a broader grain window,the spey is a very light rod and casts an actual 6wt line well while the switch bounces all over when under-lined

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Mike Oliver said:

Slip

 

The spec you give for the 12 foot rod is unclear to me.

 

As Killie has asked is the line rating for the 6 wt a single hand line or a two hand line. Very different.

 

So called Skagit casting which is really water anchored casting is easier to learn that airborne anchors or spicy cast.

 

Air borne or touch and go make a lot less noise on the water than rooster tail,skagit.

 

Single spey is hard but a great cast once you have it down.

 

When I do get over to,fish  steel  with you I aim to useboth  two hand and single.

 

Mike

It's a Sage Z-axis 6126 and the blank says "6wt",very senstive rod for a spey,you don't lose any of the lively feel of a fish on the end of your line like w/ heavier rods I have that dampen the feel of the fight.I was looking at the Trout and Lite Spey lines for this rod.

I'm gonna be pickin your brain and bugging you for instruction next I see you.Ideally,we'll hit tribs in at least NY,Ohio and Michigan so your arsenal will see duty on numerous venues and types from spring creek to freestone,swinging to nymphing.

I've actually got three 12 1/2'er's,a 7 and 8 in addition to the "6wt" that have seen action primarily as rollcasting rods using long-belly lines for steelhead indi fishing,I think those are XP's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, chicky said:

Why does it have to be Skagit?

looks fun,something new to learn...look it up on YT

Herb put me on it and I was, like,well,would ya lookit that...?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 mins ago, slip n slide said:

looks fun,something new to learn...look it up on YT

Herb put me on it and I was, like,well,would ya lookit that...?

You may want an integrated line or scandi as other options. If you are thinking steelhead and heavy tips than Skagit will do ya. There are many variables you need to consider and play with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I fish an Echo TR 6126 12' 6" spey rod that's rated for 6 wt line, 420-540 grains. I line it with the Rio Switch Chucker 7 wt. It's an integrated line and it works great for me. I mostly swing weighted streamers on the Lake Erie tribs. I don't need great distance on those streams and this line turns over weighted flies quite well. I'm no expert caster and I'm quite happy with this rod/line combination.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Over on the other website that has pages and talks about spey the Z axis 12'6" 6wt has some die hard fans but even they would say that the tip is overly flexible and thin.  That makes it more responsive with a light(er) load.  But it can also throw heavier because the blank bends well into the mid-section.  It's not a great overhead rod though because the tip is too flexible.  I think that's why you are finding that it is o.k. with lines that are essentially lower than the rod's rating, even though it can handle a bit more grainage.  In contrast the Echo TR 12'6" rod is more of a brute force rod that really performs when you load it up toward the heavier side of it's rating.  More of 6/7 spey rod IMO.  (540 grains is often ~7/8 rating). Very good all around rod, albeit heavier than the Z axis by quite a bit.  The Echo rods are also very very tough.  You don't hear about them breaking much.

 

My preference is for stiffer tipped spey rods that can see double duty as overhead rods with heavier lines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi SnS,

personally I cast the old Z-Axis #6 (I love it) with a 375 grains Scandi Short when air borne casting styles or a 400 grains Skagit Compact when water anchored-snap T casts, always plus a 10 feet tip in this case (in various densities from float to sink 7 depending on fishing situations). I use both heads types not integrated but connected loop to loop to a thin as possible monofilament running line and I never cast overhead with two hands rods, even if short, all the time.

Apart from my personal preferences I think you'll be fine with the same weights window also with the 11' rated #6 rod.

 

Have a lot of fun!

david

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, slip n slide said:

looks fun,something new to learn...look it up on YT

Herb put me on it and I was, like,well,would ya lookit that...?

Slip n slide.

 

Skagit to most guys means water anchored casting for calibration purposes.

These are easier casts to learn than single spey but they make more disturbance on the water and if you have spooky fish and clear water that could be an issue. If you want to cast fast sinking tips and heavy flies skagit will get the job done. It used to be just a floating skagit head followed by a looped on tip of your choice but now you can get multi density heads and tips.

Your rods should be fine for small to medium width rivers.

I am hazarding a guess that your two rods will cast the same weight line.

 

If you go to RIO’s web site you can find the AAFTM two hand line scale and you can get the grain weights.

Mostly you are not going to be wanting to cast over head with your TH rods on the rivers.

Whilst I can teach you a overhead cast I would be last person to show you spey, skagit etc. I am trying to learn these casts myself.

Proper teacher is the way to go.

 

mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.