jjdbike

Chicken Stock from scratch suggestions please

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Hey folks,

 

I want to make a big batch of killer, super rich and flavorful chicken stock for an upcoming paella and winter soups.

I've not done this before.

We don't have any bones or veggies in freezer and generally do not eat a lot of chicken.

This is what I was thinking:

1st I was considering asking my local butcher shop for skin, bone, and chicken odds and ends. I'd also see if any chicken w/ bone & skin on was on sale, I'd add that to the pot too. I was considering adding some turkey necks. Is this a viable option? Any cautions or suggestions here?

2nd Then I was going to buy a bunch of whole veggies and herbs, e.g. carrots, celery (including greens / tops), onions and garlic including skins and  bell peppers.

3rd roasting it all to brown them in oven at 400 for an hour or so.

4th then adding some rosemary, thyme, sage, sage, parsley, bay leaves, black pepper corns to the roasted veggies and poultry parts and top off with water in large stock pot (I have a big one), for 24 hours or so, skimming off fat, scum and froth regularly.

5th freezing it in small portions. 

Does this sound about right?

Any other suggestions or cautions? 

Thanks in advance, 

JD

P.S. What do you think Steve (SIM)? I know you make a killer chicken soup as Imy wife & I have been lucky enough to enjoy it!

Edited by jjdbike

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I made a killer gravy at Thanksgiving and I think it turned out so good because I made my own fresh turkey stock. I sauteed onions, celery, and carrots in butter and oil until soft. chopped up the gizzards and added it to the pot along with fresh herbs. I used Thyme, sage, and Rosemary. Also salt and pepper of course. cook for a few minutes, then add garlic and all of the excess skin and fat I trimmed off.  let the fat render down a bit, add a good splash of white wine. Let that cook down for a few minutes. Then add the neck and fill with water to cover the neck by an inch or so. Let that simmer for a good hour. Strain and refrigerate so the fat rises to the top and can be skimmed off.

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The turkey stuff is fine. I keep all poultry parts......wing tips, necks, any bones I may remove if de-boning a chicken, gizzards, kidneys, livers (although they can make the stock cloudy), skin, etc. You can roast the parts for a bit on a sheet pan if you want.

 

Lose the bell peppers. Celery, carrots, onions, leeks, garlic, stems from things like kale, collards, swiss chard, etc, including all the trimmings. I don't roast them, I saute them in olive oil until soft (not browned). (Not the onion/garlic peels, they go in the pot as is.)

 

Hint: put your poultry parts in the pot and add the water, and bring that to a simmer for a bit FIRST (before adding the vegetables.) any blood in the poultry will come ofs as scum on the top. It is much easier to skim this off BEFORE you add the vegetables (since some of them float). Once you have gotten most of that skimmed off, then add the rest of the stuff.

 

No need to go 24 hours, 2-3 is plenty long enough for poultry stock. And never let it come to a rolling boil, just a light simmer. Using tongs, remove the large bones and stuff to a colander over a large bowl. let drain, even squeeze the veggies a bit with a meat mallet or back of a large spoon to extract the juices. Do this in batches, returning the liquid to the pot. When you get the large stuff out, pour the entire thing thru the colander to remove the small pieces. Then put the liquid back in the pot and simmer to reduce by about 1/3.

 

Let it cool in the pot, and then put it in the fridge in the pot overnight. The fat will come to the top and congeal, making it easy to take it off (leave a bit, you need some left in the stock.) The stock itself at this point should be like jello. Reheat it to "melt", and then strain it thru a fine sieve to remove any leftover scum.

 

I freeze mine in quart and pint plastic containers (saved from yogurt, cottage cheese, deli items.)

 

Edited by Steve in Mass

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You could take a cue from the late and snarky Anthony Bourdain. In his most popular book "Kitchen Confidential," he tells the story of hiding bullion power in his uniform at cooking school and sneaking it into stocks he was being evaluated on. The cooking teachers would be amazed at how much good flavor he was able to extract from the ingredients of his stocks. In the same vein I keep a number of "better than bouillon" soup bases in the fridge to augment soups and sauces and whatever else. They can make a huge difference, beef flavor becomes beefier chicken intensifies. It's good to add a little at a time until you hit something extra good. Heresy I know :devl:.

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Simple version is 2lbs of chicken parts per 2 qts of water.  Wings, backs, necks especially but wings with whatever is cheap.  Couple carrots, celery stalks, onions.  Thyme, parsley bay if you want it seasoned. Throw it all in and simmer, never boil, about 3 hours.  Should be about 1 qt yield.  

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Instead of buying chicken all parted out, buy 4-5 whole chickens. Butcher out the breasts, wings, thighs, legs and double Ziploc freezer bag them up or separate the parts by type and freeze to eat at later date. Take the 4-5 carcasses you amassed and make your rich stock. Note do not use the liver as this can make the stock cloudy and well, livery tasting, but neck, gizzards, hearts, can all go in the stock pot. Cut up some root vegies, carrots, onion, potato, celery, etc. and add these and the chicken carcasses to a roasting pan and roast in over at 350 degrees for 1 hour, remove all the veggies and carcasses from oven and scrap into large stock pot. Fill the pot with water and then season to taste, salt & pepper. Get the pot almost to a rolling boil, but not quite there, and then reduce the heat to low simmer covered for 2-3 hours (not boiling the stock to a roiling boil helps keep the stock clear in color and not all cloudy and foamy), strain all the veggies and chicken carcasses out and then run through a fine mesh sieve to remove any flotsam. You can pick all the cooked chicken meat off the carcasses to be reserved for chicken soup later or chicken tacos, etc. Also save the wish bones from the chicken carcasses, then right before you serve something you made with the stock with loved ones you can have two guest pull on each end of the wish bones for fun and to bless the meal! Enjoy your stock and hope it is rich with goodness!   

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Lots of good recommendations above. Remember that this cooking, not chemistry,,,or baking.  By that I mean the ratios aren't super critical.  I make my stock from scratch for my homemade chicken soup and other dishes.  As few quick thoughts

1) you can get bags of leg quarter pretty cheap- $.69/lb by me. I add these to the other bones/carcasses I accumulate in my freezer after parting out whole chicken.  The dark meat tends to have good flavor.  

2) Roasting does add some godo flavor but it's not critical. I have browned off the chicken in the pot before boiling with just a bit of oil.  Quicker , maybe not quite as good but still good

3) The wing tips (the part you trim off ) have lots of collagen and cartridge that when boiled down gives what the experts call good mouth feel.  It means the stock has lots of gelatin- you can see it as it sets up in the fridge. While I haven't' tried them, chicken feet supposedly also make good stock.

4) Cheesecloth in a strainer works well for getting out all the little bits

5) Don't freak out if the stock does boil- It wont' end up quite so clear, but it will still be good

6)  How much you reduce the stock will make a difference in the flavor- more reduction = more concentrated flavor.

7) Yes, bouillon may be heresy but I too sometimes supplement.  I dont' add any other salt than what is in a good concentrate- Better than Boulllion low salt is pretty good.  My BIL the chef recommended RC Fine foods- you can get it off Amazon- their vege base adds a bit more depth to homemade stock

 

No matter what you do, it should be better than Swansons….

 

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4 hours ago, sbcbmx112 said:

As SiM said, blanch the bones first to get rid of scum.  The way I do it is blanch the bones, discard the water, roast them in oven, then make the stock.

I would never throw away that water. That is where all the flavor is............

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1 hour ago, Steve in Mass said:

I would never throw away that water. That is where all the flavor is............

That what I thought the first time I was told to do this but somehow you still get a great stock :shrug:

 

Its just a quick blanch in a small amount of water.

Edited by sbcbmx112

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47 mins ago, sbcbmx112 said:

in a small amount of water.

Well, when I make stock there ain't no "small amount of water" that is gonna cover all the bones and parts I have. We are talking at least a gallon and a half if not more. ;)

 

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My newest vibe is from a pro chef.  There is no giant magic in it, but it takes up way less time.

Per half gallon water.

2 chicken carcass

OR

1 chicken carcass and 1 lb of chicken FEET (Chinese Market) for super rich stock.  All I use anymore.

 

8pm

Put the stuff in the the pot.  Whatever you like to use, just remember use the above ratio.

NO salt to start.  Salt it when you use it, whatever recipe you use it in.

 

Bring almost to boil.  Cover pot, put in oven at 200 degrees.  All night.  Strain it in the morning.  Jar it up.

 

Plenty good, and its just plain easy.

 

 

Beef ratio is 2 lb of bones per half gallon.  Roasting bones makes stock darker color, but you can do that with Maggi Sauce.  Same thing

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