JerseyMike609

Conservation conversation from Fishing reports for December 2019

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39 mins ago, DragonsLax48 said:

Beat it kook. Drop a complaint or a dink pic and sit tight.

 

There is only room for one fishless in the reports thread and his name ain't Joe!

Edited by PhilCVG

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1 hour ago, DragonsLax48 said:

Beat it kook, this is the Striped Bass population complaints box. Drop a complaint or a dink pic and sit tight.

 

Hilarious. 

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My 2 cents....2012 Sandy event had the greatest impact.

  • 378,000+ gallons of diesel fuel into the Authur Kill
  • 1 billion gallons of raw sewerage into Raritan Bay
  • significant loss of aqautic habitat and forage species
  • heigth of striped bass, bunker, peanut bunker, sand eel and bluefish migration
  • substantial change to coastal basin
  • impact to the 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012 striper hatch

Lowest LBI Classic surf catch per angler from 2012 to present of striped bass and bluefish...% catch rate per angler was significantly higher for both species in years prior to Sandy from 1993 to 2011

Perhaps a spring mortatorium would help the spawning classes to do so without pressure fortifying the surviving hatch classes post Sandy.

 

Sandy impact on coastal environment assessment

https://www.nrc.gov/docs/ML1409/ML14094A367.pdf

 

 

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2 hours ago, DragonsLax48 said:

All too often the great citizens of this country become FIXATED on TREATING their problems. These problems are consistently reoccurring and this is true for all topics. Lets take hospitals/medicine for example. Mr Senior Citizen has bad back pain so Mr doctor prescribes pain killers and therapy. Those PK solve his problems right? now he can go dance right? WRONG, hes just putting a bandage on the wound. That is how you short sighted kooks problem solve...

 

Size regulations are no different than the pain killers in my example. Its a short term solution to save a few fish and save face. MD is a damn mess and a huge culprit in the lack on Striped Bass along our coast. But you have to ask why? My answer is the polluted Chesapeake Bay watershed. These fish are spawning in toxic water thanks to farm runoff and storm waster water.

 

Adress the problems at the source and devise a plan that anticipates heavy rains, high winds, and etc that cause the run off to drain into the bay. This is bigger than MD... this is MD, VA, PA, NY, and DE that feed into the CB. The same can be said about other spawning tributaries.

The conservancy for Chesapeake Bay has been trying to institute tmdls total maximum daily limits of pollutants throughout watershed. Think about the political obstacles they encounter from places so far upstream. 
 

I know someone lives on Chesapeake he had horrible year fishing. Only place he could find stripers was under duck blinds with spot. Bay heats up in summer creates dead zones in lower cooler waters and fish have less places to survive let alone thrive. NJ got no leg to stand on with conditions of both Delaware and barnegat bay.

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6 mins ago, Potato Caboose said:

The conservancy for Chesapeake Bay has been trying to institute tmdls total maximum daily limits of pollutants throughout watershed. Think about the political obstacles they encounter from places so far upstream. 
 

I know someone lives on Chesapeake he had horrible year fishing. Only place he could find stripers was under duck blinds with spot. Bay heats up in summer creates dead zones in lower cooler waters and fish have less places to survive let alone thrive. NJ got no leg to stand on with conditions of both Delaware and barnegat bay.

Im very aware of the political obstacles that the EPA and CBP encounter. I had the great pleasure of having a professor that helped start many of programs that worked with the CBP. He was pivotal in establishing the TMDLs. But the people of the CBP are fighting a good fight alone. They do not have the support from the states or other organizations. It would be in the Striped Bass fisherman's best interest to help spread the word that the polution in the headwaters creates a down stream destruction of habitats along the intercoastal waterways.

 

My understanding is that the Bass spawn and their eggs drift with the current into shallow back drafted waters to hatch. If that is true, then they are hatching in TOXIC water. Water that you would not let your children swim in.

 

Things are better now than it was in the 90s so im not so sure this explains the entire downfall of the SB stock, however I think that little is known about the long term effects of the juvy SB growing in a harsh environment. 

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Its imperative to understand the full picture. We cant point fingers at one problem and expect the whole thing to change. We need to work alongside groups such as the CBP and Barnegat Bay Partnership so that they are aware of our needs. These programs are constantly setting goals and incrementally reviewing their progress towards these goals. They need to be aware that SB stocks are in trouble and that we need to reduce mortality by X, increase stocks by Y, and that our benchmark YOY goal is 20.... You get it..

 

They should be aware of our regulations and the impact of those regulations. Im afraid this partnership has not developed. The scientists and grantors are somewhat aware but they do not have a hand in the circle.

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2 hours ago, DragonsLax48 said:

All too often the great citizens of this country become FIXATED on TREATING their problems. These problems are consistently reoccurring and this is true for all topics. Lets take hospitals/medicine for example. Mr Senior Citizen has bad back pain so Mr doctor prescribes pain killers and therapy. Those PK solve his problems right? now he can go dance right? WRONG, hes just putting a bandage on the wound. That is how you short sighted kooks problem solve...

 

Size regulations are no different than the pain killers in my example. Its a short term solution to save a few fish and save face. MD is a damn mess and a huge culprit in the lack on Striped Bass along our coast. But you have to ask why? My answer is the polluted Chesapeake Bay watershed. These fish are spawning in toxic water thanks to farm runoff and storm waster water.

 

Adress the problems at the source and devise a plan that anticipates heavy rains, high winds, and etc that cause the run off to drain into the bay. This is bigger than MD... this is MD, VA, PA, NY, and DE that feed into the CB. The same can be said about other spawning tributaries.

I think the rivers they spawn in now compared to back when there was a moratorium are way less toxic. They def still polluted and not the cleanest water, but we could see after the moratorium once the bass were protected and spawning at a healthier stock size that the Chesapeake can put out huge numbers of fish. It doesn’t help but I think nowadays the water is significantly less toxic. 

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36 mins ago, Potato Caboose said:

The conservancy for Chesapeake Bay has been trying to institute tmdls total maximum daily limits of pollutants throughout watershed. Think about the political obstacles they encounter from places so far upstream. 
 

I know someone lives on Chesapeake he had horrible year fishing. Only place he could find stripers was under duck blinds with spot. Bay heats up in summer creates dead zones in lower cooler waters and fish have less places to survive let alone thrive. NJ got no leg to stand on with conditions of both Delaware and barnegat bay.

The dead zones are definitely bad. However there are quite a few places for them to hide. The dead zones are less of a factor further south. From the choptank River north the dead zones begin shallower then where there is higher salinity. I also have a theory the past 2 years have been bad dead zone wise because of all the rain we had down here. Less rain more salinity the dead zones are much deeper. 

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4 mins ago, DragonsLax48 said:

Its imperative to understand the full picture. We cant point fingers at one problem and expect the whole thing to change. We need to work alongside groups such as the CBP and Barnegat Bay Partnership so that they are aware of our needs. These programs are constantly setting goals and incrementally reviewing their progress towards these goals. They need to be aware that SB stocks are in trouble and that we need to reduce mortality by X, increase stocks by Y, and that our benchmark YOY goal is 20.... You get it..

 

They should be aware of our regulations and the impact of those regulations. Im afraid this partnership has not developed. The scientists and grantors are somewhat aware but they do not have a hand in the circle.

Chesapeake Bay Foundation was vocal about the menhaden issues in VA but I’m not sure if they would step into the cluster eff of the striped bass fishery in the bay. Virginia has it right, MD not so much. 

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1 min ago, linesiderdemdnj said:

I think the rivers they spawn in now compared to back when there was a moratorium are way less toxic. They def still polluted and not the cleanest water, but we could see after the moratorium once the bass were protected and spawning at a healthier stock size that the Chesapeake can put out huge numbers of fish. It doesn’t help but I think nowadays the water is significantly less toxic. 

It is certainly less toxic and the program is very proud of their achievements but it was explained to me that the concentrated areas are still incredibly toxic. I was told that my way of picturing the polluted waters was a good one. Picture a bottle with half oil (imagine the oil as nutrients from "runoff") and half water... it seperates with oil on top. Add in the clean water act, the clean air act, TMDL implementation, etc... and you start to take out some of that oil and replace it with clean water. You are eliminating the oil thats closest to the bottom but theres still oil on top.

 

The top of the water symbolizes the shallow areas with low to no current within the bay. As you know the bay is Very shallow. So yes, the mouth, the channels, and the rivers are doing better but the areas where SB spawn and other creatures intend on inhabitate are still as toxic as ever.

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12 mins ago, DragonsLax48 said:

It is certainly less toxic and the program is very proud of their achievements but it was explained to me that the concentrated areas are still incredibly toxic. I was told that my way of picturing the polluted waters was a good one. Picture a bottle with half oil (imagine the oil as nutrients from "runoff") and half water... it seperates with oil on top. Add in the clean water act, the clean air act, TMDL implementation, etc... and you start to take out some of that oil and replace it with clean water. You are eliminating the oil thats closest to the bottom but theres still oil on top.

 

The top of the water symbolizes the shallow areas with low to no current within the bay. As you know the bay is Very shallow. So yes, the mouth, the channels, and the rivers are doing better but the areas where SB spawn and other creatures intend on inhabitate are still as toxic as ever.

No doubt. You are right. But here is a curveball - if we had a robust spawning stock of bass that come to this bay and were protected, I think they would be just fine. The dirty water and toxicity in no way can be positive and doesn’t help anything. But if we had a robust population of fish all spawning I think it would be fine. A lot of that toxicity that sticks around is because there is less than 1% of the natural population of oysters in the bay. Those things are fished hard and will probably be gone soon. I fished areas with my dad when I was little and you could see huge areas of oyster beds and we would get snagged on them. An area I wade fish at used to have big oyster beds. They’re gone. Most of the oysters are gone. Maybe with some menhaden restrictions/moratorium on them there will be fractionally better water. Maybe maybe not. 

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26 mins ago, linesiderdemdnj said:

No doubt. You are right. But here is a curveball - if we had a robust spawning stock of bass that come to this bay and were protected, I think they would be just fine. The dirty water and toxicity in no way can be positive and doesn’t help anything. But if we had a robust population of fish all spawning I think it would be fine. A lot of that toxicity that sticks around is because there is less than 1% of the natural population of oysters in the bay. Those things are fished hard and will probably be gone soon. I fished areas with my dad when I was little and you could see huge areas of oyster beds and we would get snagged on them. An area I wade fish at used to have big oyster beds. They’re gone. Most of the oysters are gone. Maybe with some menhaden restrictions/moratorium on them there will be fractionally better water. Maybe maybe not. 

A solid point. This is a much more dynamic issue than most can even fathom. Oysters and mussels are filter feeders and filter the bottom so that other vegetation can grow and absorb CO2 and create O for the fish in these low oxygenated areas

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excuse me everyone. Looking for some advice or direction.  My  apologies if i am not allowed to post this here. I just looked at the forum page and I couldnt find a location to post it and figured this is probably the best way to find out is to reach out to fisherman who a lot own boats even though this is the surf fishing report section.  This season around august a family friend allowed me to leave my boat at their unused dock in monmouth beach after only being able to get out once last year and wasting 2k on dock fee.  My father and I got a chance to go out which was a full moon and when we came back we read the tides wrong and were in 1.5-2ft of water with the motor pulled up as high as i could. I couldnt not turn around I had to just go for it due to the channel being that deep too where the we were in the river.  really terrible that they dont maintain channels but thats for another time lol.  I finally got to the dock but bc it was only a foot and a half i had to go up to it with throttle instead of coaster or we wouldnt have made it. Looking back I should have put it in neutral and just walked to the dock but I panicked bc of the stress i felt and how pissed off i was.  as soon as we got to the dock I slammed it into reverse to avoid hitting bulk head and tied the boat up and went home.  that week we had those extremely cold temps so we came back to pull the boat out of the water and when i got in the boat i started it and it started right up. There was ice on everything but ran great.  cut the lines and put it in reverse. it back out of the slip and then i went to put it in forward and the boat would only stay in reverse and accelerate in reverse.  I had to have it towed to the dock to get it out before a high wind storm. Ive talked to a few people some say check the throttle cable and throttle on the engine itself.  When we were waiting for the tow to come we were at the dock and i pulled the cover  and the throttle did not want to move all the way until we oiled it up than it moved freely but still couldnt drive it.  Some say it is the whole lower end and some say its the shifter  shaft. Does anyone have any suggestions or know and honest marine mechanics mobile or with a shop? My motor is a 2000 yamaha 150hp with about 40 hrs. barely used. Thank you and my apologies if I am not allowed to post this here. Feel free to Pm Me. Thank you guys appreciate it.

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On 12/1/2019 at 10:25 PM, JerseyMike609 said:

Half the people complaining about shorts wouldnt take a keeper home anyway,Last week in Monmouth County fish were hitting ever cast but people still complain! The last few months all I've heard is how decimated the stock is but for some reason people still seem surprised theres not a fall run like there used to be! I havent had any amazing days fishing this fall but I have had 2-3 pretty good ones and until all the States start taking this fishery seriously what do you expect?

the stocks are worn out and the ppl are still beatin on 'em till they're worn out and dead....ya'll are eatin' your seed corn,in it for the moment,not the long run

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