JerseyMike609

Conservation conversation from Fishing reports for December 2019

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The last two strong reproductive years for stripers in the Chesapeake were 2011 and 2015 (2016 was dreadful, 2017 and 2018 about average). Those 2011 fish should be in the low 30-inch range about now. Where did they go? The 2015 class is roughly 21 to 23 inches. We have no shortage of that size. The question is, will those 2015 stripers still be around when they're 30 or more inches, or will they go the way of the 2011 class?

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3 mins ago, stranded1 said:

The last two strong reproductive years for stripers in the Chesapeake were 2011 and 2015 (2016 was dreadful, 2017 and 2018 about average). Those 2011 fish should be in the low 30-inch range about now. Where did they go? The 2015 class is roughly 21 to 23 inches. We have no shortage of that size. The question is, will those 2015 stripers still be around when they're 30 or more inches, or will they go the way of the 2011 class?

That’s what the slot is for. Destroying the 2015 class. 
Can’t make this up. 

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9 mins ago, stranded1 said:

The last two strong reproductive years for stripers in the Chesapeake were 2011 and 2015 (2016 was dreadful, 2017 and 2018 about average). Those 2011 fish should be in the low 30-inch range about now. Where did they go? The 2015 class is roughly 21 to 23 inches. We have no shortage of that size. The question is, will those 2015 stripers still be around when they're 30 or more inches, or will they go the way of the 2011 class?

2011’s were wiped out by Maryland.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Not to be the bearer of bad news but if you go to N J fishingdotcom you will get a good idea of why the size of stripers being caught on the beaches are few and far between. Lots of fish being harvested by fisherman because they pay $$ to be put on the fishing grounds.You do that day in and day out with multiple boats and sometimes 2-3 trips a day just for 1 boat and there goes your striper population. Look at the size of some of these fish,some well over 20-30 lbs.Sometimes the captain's tell them a smaller fish would be more beneficial but ultimately it's up to the customer.Bottom line people will continue to fish for stripers, I'm not against party boat fishing or anything like that but to blame guys for poor fish handling from surf fisherman is kind of a stretch to me.Thats just my opinion, enough said.:niffty:

Edited by Still_pluggin91911

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1 hour ago, Still_pluggin91911 said:

Not to be the bearer of bad news but if you go to N J fishingdotcom you will get a good idea of why the size of stripers being caught on the beaches are few and far between. Lots of fish being harvested by fisherman because they pay $$ to be put on the fishing grounds.You do that day in and day out with multiple boats and sometimes 2-3 trips a day just for 1 boat and there goes your striper population. Look at the size of some of these fish,some well over 20-30 lbs.Sometimes the captain's tell them a smaller fish would be more beneficial but ultimately it's up to the customer.Bottom line people will continue to fish for stripers, I'm not against party boat fishing or anything like that but to blame guys for poor fish handling from surf fisherman is kind of a stretch to me.Thats just my opinion, enough said.:niffty:

It’s everyone. It isn’t just Maryland like the guy above says. To say that is simply uneducated. These fish travel from MD to Maine and everywhere in between. If I am counting my fingers correctly and have a basic elementary knowledge of a map of the USA , I can count 9 states that all play a part in fish depletion. It isn’t one state, it isn’t the boats, it isn’t comms, it is everyone who throws a line or net in the water for striped bass. Lots of fisherman, lots of poaching, lots of keeping fish, lots of mortality equals lots of dead fish. It’s really that simple 

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7 mins ago, linesiderdemdnj said:

It’s everyone. It isn’t just Maryland like the guy above says. To say that is simply uneducated. These fish travel from MD to Maine and everywhere in between. If I am counting my fingers correctly and have a basic elementary knowledge of a map of the USA , I can count 9 states that all play a part in fish depletion. It isn’t one state, it isn’t the boats, it isn’t comms, it is everyone who throws a line or net in the water for striped bass. Lots of fisherman, lots of poaching, lots of keeping fish, lots of mortality equals lots of dead fish. It’s really that simple 

If you’re referring to me, “the guy”, I can assure you I’m educated.  The impact MD imposed on the 2011 class was substantial and disproportionate to other states.  Notes from the Feb 2018 meeting:

 

Late in 2016, the Board was presented with an assessment update that evaluated state and coastal performance of Addendum IV management measures in 2015.

While every coastal state achieved a harvest reduction that was either close to or much greater than the required 25%, Maryland didn’t come close to achieving its required 20.5% reduction. In fact, its recreational landings increased dramatically, and were 50% higherthan they were in 2012, rather than being 20.5% less.

There were a few reasons for this, the biggest one being that the 2011 year-class of striped bass was very large, and Chesapeake Bay anglers were encountering A LOT of them when they fished.

While some of those 2011s were 20” and over, in 2015, most were still too small for anglers to keep. Such an abundance of undersized bass resulted in a high catch rate, but also in a large number of small bass that were discarded dead.

Maryland admitted that the estimated number of fish caught and kept, plus dead discards, was high in the Bay, but the state also argued that it did keep its fishing mortality rate below the target, which was one of the main goals of Addendum IV.

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I refuse to blame the fishermen. Blame regulations and poachers, but can't blame law abiding folks. I don't have to agree with someone's decision to harvest a 30 lb bass every week, but I refuse to let myself get too worked up

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18 mins ago, cartopper said:

If you’re referring to me, “the guy”, I can assure you I’m educated.  The impact MD imposed on the 2011 class was substantial and disproportionate to other states.  Notes from the Feb 2018 meeting:

 

Late in 2016, the Board was presented with an assessment update that evaluated state and coastal performance of Addendum IV management measures in 2015.

While every coastal state achieved a harvest reduction that was either close to or much greater than the required 25%, Maryland didn’t come close to achieving its required 20.5% reduction. In fact, its recreational landings increased dramatically, and were 50% higherthan they were in 2012, rather than being 20.5% less.

There were a few reasons for this, the biggest one being that the 2011 year-class of striped bass was very large, and Chesapeake Bay anglers were encountering A LOT of them when they fished.

While some of those 2011s were 20” and over, in 2015, most were still too small for anglers to keep. Such an abundance of undersized bass resulted in a high catch rate, but also in a large number of small bass that were discarded dead.

Maryland admitted that the estimated number of fish caught and kept, plus dead discards, was high in the Bay, but the state also argued that it did keep its fishing mortality rate below the target, which was one of the main goals of Addendum IV.

Chesapeake Bay Journal has a story this month about mycobacterium and its potential impact on striper populations. They think 90% of Chesapeake stripers have bacteria by age five which could be leading to reduction of population in conjunction with overfishing or in lieu of it

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54 mins ago, cartopper said:

If you’re referring to me, “the guy”, I can assure you I’m educated.  The impact MD imposed on the 2011 class was substantial and disproportionate to other states.  Notes from the Feb 2018 meeting:

 

Late in 2016, the Board was presented with an assessment update that evaluated state and coastal performance of Addendum IV management measures in 2015.

While every coastal state achieved a harvest reduction that was either close to or much greater than the required 25%, Maryland didn’t come close to achieving its required 20.5% reduction. In fact, its recreational landings increased dramatically, and were 50% higherthan they were in 2012, rather than being 20.5% less.

There were a few reasons for this, the biggest one being that the 2011 year-class of striped bass was very large, and Chesapeake Bay anglers were encountering A LOT of them when they fished.

While some of those 2011s were 20” and over, in 2015, most were still too small for anglers to keep. Such an abundance of undersized bass resulted in a high catch rate, but also in a large number of small bass that were discarded dead.

Maryland admitted that the estimated number of fish caught and kept, plus dead discards, was high in the Bay, but the state also argued that it did keep its fishing mortality rate below the target, which was one of the main goals of Addendum IV.

So Maryland is the only one to blame? That is silly. You can think whatever you want tho dude. 

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56 mins ago, cartopper said:

If you’re referring to me, “the guy”, I can assure you I’m educated.  The impact MD imposed on the 2011 class was substantial and disproportionate to other states.  Notes from the Feb 2018 meeting:

 

Late in 2016, the Board was presented with an assessment update that evaluated state and coastal performance of Addendum IV management measures in 2015.

While every coastal state achieved a harvest reduction that was either close to or much greater than the required 25%, Maryland didn’t come close to achieving its required 20.5% reduction. In fact, its recreational landings increased dramatically, and were 50% higherthan they were in 2012, rather than being 20.5% less.

There were a few reasons for this, the biggest one being that the 2011 year-class of striped bass was very large, and Chesapeake Bay anglers were encountering A LOT of them when they fished.

While some of those 2011s were 20” and over, in 2015, most were still too small for anglers to keep. Such an abundance of undersized bass resulted in a high catch rate, but also in a large number of small bass that were discarded dead.

Maryland admitted that the estimated number of fish caught and kept, plus dead discards, was high in the Bay, but the state also argued that it did keep its fishing mortality rate below the target, which was one of the main goals of Addendum IV.

Also in 2016 those fish would have been higher chance than not migrating out of the bay. We were catching 2011s in 2015 and 2016. It isn’t just MD. 

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49 mins ago, hurricane1091 said:

I refuse to blame the fishermen. Blame regulations and poachers, but can't blame law abiding folks. I don't have to agree with someone's decision to harvest a 30 lb bass every week, but I refuse to let myself get too worked up

You refusing to blame fisherman for keeping fish does not add up. It’s fisherman, it’s poachers, it’s charters, it’s comms, it is everyone who fishes for striped bass by any means.

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4 mins ago, linesiderdemdnj said:

So Maryland is the only one to blame? That is silly. You can think whatever you want tho dude. 

Dude . . . Let’s put it this way.  Had MD not had such a major mortality impact on the 2011 class, we’d still be seeing those fish and not complaining about all the sub 28” fish.

 

Facts may not fit your narrative, but they are the facts.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I agree totally that it is multiple states contributing to the factor of striped bass population. I was just stating what we see here in our state. I'm sure we have poachers here in jersey but sooner or later it catches up to them whether it's a fellow fisherman calling it in or a random check. I still say the boats out in the atlantic or bays contribute to striper depletion more then surf fisherman. The guys on the boats have a huge network of how they can get on the fish quickly and be in and out and ready for there next trip. And again I'm not bashing them, that's there gig,  just saying it is what it is at this point. We need to accept the card we have been dealt with majority of our fish being schoolie fish. I suppose it could be worse and not catch anything, atleast to most of us, it's a hobby and not a business.

Edited by Still_pluggin91911

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From what I see on the net, a few bigger/larger fish other then what most of us been catching are off south shore of long island, assuming the fish pass our jersey beaches maybe we will see some bigger fish? I'm no expert, all we can do is keep trying and see if it gets any better before the fall run is done with this year.

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5 mins ago, cartopper said:

Dude . . . Let’s put it this way.  Had MD not had such a major mortality impact on the 2011 class, we’d still be seeing those fish and not complaining about all the sub 28” fish.

 

Facts may not fit your narrative, but they are the facts.

My narrative.... haha. Funny how jersey guys think they know exactly what the deal is down here. It don’t matter what the size limit would be because 2011s would have fit into 18”, 19” or 20” minimum which has been the changing limit since 2011. The Chesapeake bay has such small limits because fish are around all the time when they are young enough so to have a 28” minimum, as an example, would be extremely hard for the economy of the state (I am 100% not sticking up for MD at all, that is the reality of the fishery down here) so no matter what those fish would have been targeted. Jersey doesn’t even see only Chesapeake fish anyway. Delaware fish and I would guess Hudson fish show up on your beaches. So let’s see since you’re so knowledgeable about the situation down here in MD I guess our MD fisherman depleted some Hudson fish and Delaware river fish too?  I know that doesn’t fit your narrative either, but those are facts as well. 

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