BrianBM

Tesla's pickup

121 posts in this topic

Was put on display today ... the windows breaking was funny, but the use of sheet steel as an exoskeleton intrigues me.  Is there really no chassis under that sheet metal?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I work in rich neighborhoods and almost get run down by idiots in those ugly-azz SUVs everyday. That's more or less irrelevant to the topic. Man I must say that thing is hideous. The answer is apparently not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 mins ago, Slowwwride said:

I work in rich neighborhoods and almost get run down by idiots in those ugly-azz SUVs everyday. That's more or less irrelevant to the topic. Man I must say that thing is hideous. The answer is apparently not.

the more you look at it the cooler looking it gets, for 50grand you get more than anything else out there looks aside. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ugliest truck I ever saw! I really thought it was a prank and that the actual truck was going to roll out after the laughter stopped. I still think it may be a publicity stunt and that is not the real truck. At least the share holders of Tesla stock should hope that is the case because if that hideous looking "Mad Max" movie truck is for real then they better dump that stock immediately!  

Edited by Flip n Dip

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe.  Yet Tesla has sold a good many electric vehicles, so I'll give Musk the benefit of the doubt. Let's see some on the road, and off the road, please.

 

In theory, electric motors should be ideal for off-road use; maximum torque available the instant you supply power to the motors. The most powerful vehicle is supposed to have a range of 400 miles, I think?  That's 400 highway miles. If I take it on the beach (after tire deflation, of course) at Smith Point, do I have enough amps remaining to get home to Chez Mully and plug it back in?

 

The ideal place for an electric motor in a vehicle is inside the hub. AFAIK neither Tesla nor Rivian is doing that, but I'd really like to see a schematic.

 

Now that we have the fashion votes out of the way, my opening questions remain. Is there a chassis of any kind under that stainless monocoque body, and is the monocoque body a design first? Such designs go back to WW II in fighter aircraft, but I don't know if such a design has ever been used in a vehicle intended for a mass market. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's the major problem with electric vehicles, the battery technology is just not here yet. Tesla does not even manufacture their own batteries. The batteries they use are the very same ones that are used in laptop computers. It's just a whole lot of them stacked together. They will only last at the most 5 years. That is a major expense to replace. Also, if anyone thinks this would make a great beach vehicle, consider driving across the sand with the weight of all those batteries. The truth is, electric vehicles suck. They are only good as small cars used for city driving short distances.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you're wrong on part of this ... Tesla has what was, and may still be, the largest battery factory (a "gigafactory") in the world, in Arizona. 

 

The power density of batteries, the oomph and mph and torque you get from electric batteries, has been improving steadily. The cost for an ampere of oomph has been falling. Li-Ion batteries, such as Tesla uses, are becoming safer, too. Japan has just launched the second of two submarines, diesel-electric units, in which the traditional lead-acid batteries are replaced by Li-ion units. The Li-ion batteries provide 10X the power of the older batteries. South Korea is near the launch of their first Li-ion unit too. Getting to this point required lots of R&D to mitigate the fire hazards of earlier Li-ion battery technology.

 

I can't open an Aviation Week magazine (online edition only) and not read about this-or-that electric airplane project. Right now, they're still halfway between laboratory novelty and prototype stage, yet they are already edging into viability in specialty niches, like "pseudosatellites," capable of spending months aloft, solar cells keeping them airborne during the day while also charging batteries for the night.

 

Going back to the Tesla-mobiles, if you bought one today and needed to replace the battery pack in five years, yes, that's expensive. OTOH so is five year's worth of gas and oil and fluid changes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.