DragonsLax48

Lets Talk Chunkin

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2 hours ago, Stewie said:

No cartilage left in my right shoulder. 5 or 6 casts a day is all I got. Was getting old for standing on wet rocks all night anyhoo. I even have a white rod that I'll eventually break out

I have seen a few gentlemen that does a backward cast. Don't know what is it call.  Your back is facing the water, Rod butt between your leg. both hands on the rod, casting out by pulling both hands toward your body over one of your shoulder.   Quite odd and elegant at the same time. 

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14 mins ago, DragonsLax48 said:

Question to the contributors... How important is it to chunk an area that was recently full of bait, is still full of bait, or was recently terrorized by Stripers and Yellow Eyed Demons (RIP)?? Or is spot selection the main driving point where you can expenct a shmorgesbord of baitfish to be swimming around

 

Patterning fish can be hard for 99.9% of us that have family committments, long drives, work, etc. These may be excuses but its reality. My question is regarding those nights where you're going into the soak somewhat blind.

Proof of life is actually easier with chunking than plugging.  Your long lines are in the water all the way from top to bottom, vs a small section of line in the water column when plugging.   Ticking of baitfish school moving through your line can be easily felt.  More bait school means more likely you'll get hit.   That begs the question, why chunk when you can live line when you are going for bigguns. 

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29 mins ago, DragonsLax48 said:

Can you describe a scenario that you posted here?

The rip creates a sluice way. The water rushes in and the water

rushes out. It could be an undertow on the way out. You place

yourself in a position far away from the sluice. Cast over the bar.

The current rushing toward the sluice pushes you up against the

bar. All is forced in that direction and on the way there they feed.

They can be ambushing prey or just enjoying rushing water through

there gills as they're taking a free ride. Oxygen enriched and cooler

waters. I find this to be very productive in the heat of the summer. ;)

 

Very few people can cast that far with 8 ounces and 1/4 chunk

of an adult bunker. I need a good tail wind, possibly 15 to 20 mph.

Edited by SandSpike1

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5 hours ago, EricDice said:

One tip I would have for noobs trying to chunk is To use stiffer leader material for your rigs. Soft mono gets coiled up or tangled around itself. For plugging leader material, I would commonly use from 30 to 50 pound test leader and often it’s standard old fashioned monofilament from the small spools people use for running main line. But with bait, whether fluorocarbon or mono, I would only use the stuff Specifically designed as leader material. 

 

@hurricane1091 try J hooks versus circle hooks and see if that increases your hook up rate. Try high low rigs versus fishfinder. If fishfinder, use a very short leader at the business end of your rig, and don’t use a Sputnik sinker. Must avoid tangles at all cost. 

I only use pyramids and usually use a fish finder rig but my leader is long. I have used mono and fluro this year but prefer mono leaders honestly. I haven't had a bad hookup rate with circles. I have bait runner reels so I don't tend to mind them but I do keep Js with me in case I lose confidence.

 

I read the rest of the post. I'm in zero position to disagree with anyone given my track record, but I do use 10-11 rods that are heavy. I have a tica and an okuma with Penn fierce 6000 bait runners. I do use surf rods and I do use circles hooks. I have a hard time arguing with someone who has a lot of experience who does the exact opposite of me but I hope what I'm doing is OK. I set the bait runner drag as low as possible and I have my doubts that a bass could pick it up without me seeing the rod bend - except for when it's very windy and very rough and the rod has some play in it just sitting on the rod holder. I'm not comfortable using anything but spinning from the surf and I do fish South Jersey and can simply cast further with a spinning rod.

 

I'm always playing with sinker weight and leader length and definitely haven't dialed it in yet. I do have something interesting to add though. I was catching bass this spring on blood worms when bunker was present in the surf. Snagging or chunking bunker wouldn't result in a hookup for some reason but bloodworms back out there would. I can't make much sense of it. I must have been doing something wrong is all I can imagine.

Edited by hurricane1091

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We called it chunking but we used clam bellies instead of bunker. 

I worked in sales at a clam company down here in Cape May County and they hand shucked all their surf clams. One of the by-products was the belly sack of the clam. This golf ball size sack held all the organs and dark matter that you didn't want to see in your chowder. People didn't want to eat it but the fish sure did. It was the soft part of the clam that had all the flavor. I found that out as a kid fishing with my father for kingfish. We would anchor in our favorite spot and dropped the chum pot down. He would use live mussels for bait and kill the kings but I couldn't hook a live mussel to save my life so I had to use clam. Found out then that if there wasn't a piece of belly on the hook then I wasn't catching. 

Move up to the early 90's and we figured out how to use the bellies for the stripers. Would take two bags with about thirty pounds of bellies in each. Had a large plastic tote about thirty gallon size and dump a bag of bellies in along with about twenty gallons of bay water then stir. Looked like chocolate milk when we finished then using a cup or scoop we would dump a bunch over the side making sure it was mostly juice and a few bellies to drift away with the current. Did this every minute or two so we had a good scent line for the fish to follow right back to the boat. 

We would use size 7/0 J hooks with an ounce weight and cast it behind the boat and feed out line till it hit bottom. Then slowly lift and drop to keep it moving and to keep the crabs off the bait. Eventually the stripers would cross paths with the scent and pick a belly or two up as they made their way to the source. When it happened all hell would break loose and as long as we chummed and chunked the bellies we had fish. 

Eventually most of the bait wholesalers began purchasing the bellies from the plant and everyone down here was using them. We sold tons of them from the shop and made quite a few shows using them in our back bays. For back here in the skinny water we had stripers up to 44 inches and days where we caught over fifty fish on a tide. Never put a rod in a holder and only fished one rod each. As soon as we had a strike we set the hook and can only remember a hand full of times where we gut hooked them. 

That was back in the striper heyday but we haven't used bellies in about four years now. Mostly schoolies down here when they are around and interest is fading plus I got tired of bagging them up. Bag up 2,000 pounds of them a few times a week and you get tired of them after a few years.

They worked because stripers are swimming seagulls and they have a large sack they want filled with food. If they can fit it in their mouth and digest it then they will eat it. As long as we kept the scent train going and had one person dedicates to dumping the bellies and juice then we had as many stripers as we wanted. tossing out mostly juice and a few bellies worked great because when we ran low on the juice we just added more water and mixed. Those were the days. 

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Interesting topic especially in light of bob the garbage man lol I enjoyed reading and picking a few tips up. 

 

I don’t have any good advise since I only caught one chunking from the shore, plenty from the boat but that’s a little different. 

 

Funny thing is that chunking is how I started stripper fishing! I grew up fishing the rivers and freshwater with my father... But I moved to the shore when I was in college. When I was in my young 20 my old man bought me a surf rod setup and gave me all these frozen herring. He used to catch them, freeze them and use them for bait for strippers in the Chesapeake bay. Anyways, I had a freezer full! And I would truck down to my fav surfing jetty, which was tall and easy to get on at any tide- and walk out on the end and toss some chunks. I spent a lot of time out there, with my big white rod... cooler and even the old style thermos filled with coffee! Didn’t catch a thing! Lol I think I lost a lot of bait, but I didn’t know what I was doing and was probably down there in the wrong season even.  Eventually I got one! I soon realize that I had a problem with landing the fish, it was too big to get up on the jetty so I somehow walked it back to the beach. I was hooked...

Anyways- soon thereafter when I wasn’t out fishing chunk -a blitz occurred (unbeknownst to me) and all these guys showed up and were catching fish left and right! I walked down and watched... then noticed one of the guys was a surfing buddy, Johnny G who quickly introduced me to the proper lures and how to tie a leader... thankful he showed me those few things! Thanks Johnny! 

Edited by Mr.Belmar

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Id rather not discuss over the internet, but I will say chunks take my largest fish every single year.  If you spike your rod, you aren't chunking.

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9 mins ago, Hammerz said:

Id rather not discuss over the internet, but I will say chunks take my largest fish every single year.  If you spike your rod, you aren't chunking.

You're definitely better at this than me, but I have to know why spiking is bad. I'm not sure I'll "miss the bite" by spiking, so I'm assuming the risk is not of missing the bite visually but missing the hook set? I don't seem to have an issue seeing bites with my rods, but I can't say I don't miss hookups 

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25 mins ago, hurricane1091 said:

You're definitely better at this than me, but I have to know why spiking is bad. I'm not sure I'll "miss the bite" by spiking, so I'm assuming the risk is not of missing the bite visually but missing the hook set? I don't seem to have an issue seeing bites with my rods, but I can't say I don't miss hookups 

When you see that bite, the fish could of been sniffing around for 10 minutes, you'd know if you were holding your rod.  Also  the fish most likely will feel something odd and drop bait if you have it spiked, or worse swallow your hook.

 

I keep my reel in freespool, very lightly feathering the line with my thumb and sometimes fish feel me if I have too much pressure applied.  

 

You also need to feel which bites to ignore.  

Edited by Hammerz

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13 hours ago, hurricane1091 said:

You're definitely better at this than me, but I have to know why spiking is bad. I'm not sure I'll "miss the bite" by spiking, so I'm assuming the risk is not of missing the bite visually but missing the hook set? I don't seem to have an issue seeing bites with my rods, but I can't say I don't miss hookups 

 

I promise you're missing bites and hookups.  You're getting some good advice from experienced chunkers.  It sounds like from the reports that you havent been doing so hot with bass this year on bait, catching a few small fish here and there is fine if thats what you want to do.  But if you really figure out chunking you'll find out that a "decent" chunk bite is catching double digit fish that are in the 20lb+ range.  I'm far from an expert, but why not take the advice and give it a shot?  Cant really hurt.

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By doing it over and over again.  Boot on the ground, no two way about it. 

 

If you fish enough bottom contacting lures like a bucktail, you have that feeling that you are about to get a hit over certain area. You can duplicate that over and over again by feel. Can't do it by spiking a rod. 

 

Most don't care anyway, just walk up to any random spot. Cast it out as far as they can. Spiked the rod and playing with their smartphone.

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21 hours ago, Hammerz said:

When you see that bite, the fish could of been sniffing around for 10 minutes, you'd know if you were holding your rod.  Also  the fish most likely will feel something odd and drop bait if you have it spiked, or worse swallow your hook.

 

I keep my reel in freespool, very lightly feathering the line with my thumb and sometimes fish feel me if I have too much pressure applied.  

 

You also need to feel which bites to ignore.  

I'm totally open to advice which is why I ask. I catch junk every time with bait with some stripers mixed in. It's absolutely within the realm of possibility that every time I've gone out I've missed bites. 

 

Basically I've researched this on SOL before. I use bait runners and circle hooks, and guys on SOL who do that as well basically said there's no point in holding it because you take away most of the resistance with setting the secondary drag loose, and there's no burying the hook since it's a circle hook. 

 

I'm conflicted because I've caught a ton of junk fish this year and some very small stripers via the spike. My ego in me tells me that I'm smart enough to see a bite but my results in the big bass department are lacking, and there's no way I can't doubt myself here and start to think I should switch to J hooks and holding the rod.

 

Either way, I've got time on my side. I'll be experimenting for sure. There's pros and cons to each, and that's what makes fishing so awesome - you get so many choices to fish how you'd like. Sand spikes lets me use two different baits or two of the same baits in different areas, which is a huge advantage, but it's also totally possible to miss some bites doing this. Holding one rod limits your variety, but it lets you focus on that rod 100 percent and giving it everything you've got, which is an obvious positive.

 

I'll actually be throwing some bait tomorrow with my brother and I do have J hooks. I'll hold my rod and give it a shot.

 

Edit: I quoted the wrong person and can't fix it

Edited by hurricane1091

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3 hours ago, hobobob said:

By doing it over and over again.  Boot on the ground, no two way about it. 

 

If you fish enough bottom contacting lures like a bucktail, you have that feeling that you are about to get a hit over certain area. You can duplicate that over and over again by feel. Can't do it by spiking a rod. 

 

Most don't care anyway, just walk up to any random spot. Cast it out as far as they can. Spiked the rod and playing with their smartphone.

I like to reel my rods in periodically to find the zone. I always mess with presentation and stuff as well. I think doing nothing is a bad idea but I'm also spiking so that might not be great either? I like spikes though since I can throw out different baits and dial in on the right one but if it's causing me to miss bites I'd have to rethink it.

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Whats more important with weight selection? light weights let you feel the soft bites and the fish dont feel the weight when they run off with your chunk but your rig may roll or slide around. Do you want your conventional rig pinned to the bottom?

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