Thumb-Burner

Kayak specific rods? Yes or no?

34 posts in this topic

I've seen some kayak-specific rods advertised but never held one.  I'm freshwater lake fishing for largemouth and spotted bass and on rare occasion a striper or hybrid.

 

What makes these "specialty rods" better for kayak.

 

I only fished three times this summer in my new kayak so while I'm a very experienced fisherman the kayak game is new to me.

 

It's winter, I just had foot surgery and and am currently overanalyzing everything about my gear.  Help me.

 

Might get one or two rods specific for kayak IF that really means anything or makes a difference.

 

Currently using STD 7' lmb rods.

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I’ve made custom rods specifically tailored to my kayak before. I think really the most important things you are looking for are one versatility. Kayaks are very cramped so I like rods that can throw a wide range of baits. And I think the second most important thing is length. The rod needs to be long enough to swing around the bow but not too long because that makes it harder to land fish. That last one obviously Varys a lot person to person. I think you’d be better off shopping around and finding rods that suit your fishing style rather than buying somthing kayak specific.

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22 mins ago, Bigred78 said:

I’ve made custom rods specifically tailored to my kayak before. I think really the most important things you are looking for are one versatility. Kayaks are very cramped so I like rods that can throw a wide range of baits. And I think the second most important thing is length. The rod needs to be long enough to swing around the bow but not too long because that makes it harder to land fish. That last one obviously Varys a lot person to person. I think you’d be better off shopping around and finding rods that suit your fishing style rather than buying somthing kayak specific.

So I don't get to make a purchase just because I am stuck inside and bored?

 

Thanks.  The versatility comment makes a lot of sense.  I've been taking four rods but would like to go with two

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13 mins ago, richie c said:

1st season on a kayak for me and the one thing I found is the butt end can get in the way.

I did notice this with one of my customs.  Had it built with a longer than normal handle for casting distance.  It's a pain in the kayak.

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Berkeley Cherrywood MH1 (single pc 7' long medium-heavy).

 

Only rod I use for many years now.

 

About $20 on Amazon or Walmart.

 

Small SS insert-free guides last forever.

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7 mins ago, Thumb-Burner said:

Thanks.  The versatility comment makes a lot of sense.  I've been taking four rods but would like to go with two

 

@Bigred78 is exactly right, versatility is key if you want to pack light. I've found the most versatile rods are ones with a softer than usual tip for its power rating. Loomis' "mag bass" series are built on that principle, but there are a few special rods sprinkled throughout various brands/lineups that also fit the bill. 

 

Daiwa Cronos 7'1ML is one such spinning rod. It has a lure rating of 1/8 - 3/4, and it's not entirely BS. Very lively tip section that you can use to flick out light lures, yet transitions smoothly into a true Medium powered backbone, so you can get a proper hook set on medium-wired hooks. You can go from dropshotting to tubing to small jerkbaits/poppers with the same rod. The tip recovery is also outstanding, fast with no rubber band bounce to it at all...definitely a unicorn at the 150ish price point. 

 

Kistler makes a few "light-medium-heavy" rods in all their lineups that purport to function the same way: the "light" refers to a lighter tip, and the "medium heavy" is the rest of the rod. One of those in baitcasting and you can crank jerk spinnerbait TX rig jig...they are designed to be versatile. 

 

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14 mins ago, buddha162 said:

 

@Bigred78 is exactly right, versatility is key if you want to pack light. I've found the most versatile rods are ones with a softer than usual tip for its power rating. Loomis' "mag bass" series are built on that principle, but there are a few special rods sprinkled throughout various brands/lineups that also fit the bill. 

 

Daiwa Cronos 7'1ML is one such spinning rod. It has a lure rating of 1/8 - 3/4, and it's not entirely BS. Very lively tip section that you can use to flick out light lures, yet transitions smoothly into a true Medium powered backbone, so you can get a proper hook set on medium-wired hooks. You can go from dropshotting to tubing to small jerkbaits/poppers with the same rod. The tip recovery is also outstanding, fast with no rubber band bounce to it at all...definitely a unicorn at the 150ish price point. 

 

Kistler makes a few "light-medium-heavy" rods in all their lineups that purport to function the same way: the "light" refers to a lighter tip, and the "medium heavy" is the rest of the rod. One of those in baitcasting and you can crank jerk spinnerbait TX rig jig...they are designed to be versatile. 

 

That chromos sounds similar to my Denali fission med action.  Love that rod.  The kistler is something I'll check out

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20 mins ago, Thumb-Burner said:

That chromos sounds similar to my Denali fission med action.  Love that rod.  The kistler is something I'll check out

 

They are hard to find. There's one on fleabay, model # is CN701MLFS

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  I was given a Okuma kayak specific rod, it is no different than the FW sticks I’ve been using for two decades. A good reel is more important IMHO. Casting distance is not as important on a yak. A kayak acts like a secondary drag, so even a pink ‘Barbie’ rod with a decent reel could probably boat a big fish. Plus if it’s ‘kayak specific’ you won’t be able to use it from the shore! LOL

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2 mins ago, cheech said:

  I was given a Okuma kayak specific rod, it is no different than the FW sticks I’ve been using for two decades. A good reel is more important IMHO. Casting distance is not as important on a yak. A kayak acts like a secondary drag, so even a pink ‘Barbie’ rod with a decent reel could probably boat a big fish. Plus if it’s ‘kayak specific’ you won’t be able to use it from the shore! LOL

Yeah, I never bought an inshore rod because I couldn't use it in freshwater.  It's illegal. Lol

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Kayak specific rods tend to mean shorter butt or added safety loop. 

 

Ive taken standard rods, cut the butt down and glue a new cap on. 

 

You can buy rod handle shrink wrap. Drill a hole up off the bottom through the blank, tie a loop and glue it in place. Add the shrink wrap and your done. 

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Just now, saltfisherman said:

Kayak specific rods tend to mean shorter butt or added safety loop. 

 

Ive taken standard rods, cut the butt down and glue a new cap on. 

 

You can buy rod handle shrink wrap. Drill a hole up off the bottom through the blank, tie a loop and glue it in place. Add the shrink wrap and your done. 

That makes sense

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Kencor a rod manufacturer used to be in business. They made panga/kayak rods. 4’10” short butt and based on the model either soft or stiff blanks. 

 

Here are three i have. The green blank is a stiff blank the others almost parabolic, very soft. 

 

I bought these off eBay years ago. 

14DCBE53-D5BC-4E58-8D7B-2420DD593C8C.jpeg

E9C3C6B0-5049-4E2F-A966-4FC39210AD1D.jpeg

F71C3347-083D-4C61-899A-FD4A299D3AA4.jpeg

Edited by saltfisherman

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2 hours ago, cheech said:

  I was given a Okuma kayak specific rod, it is no different than the FW sticks I’ve been using for two decades. A good reel is more important IMHO. Casting distance is not as important on a yak. A kayak acts like a secondary drag, so even a pink ‘Barbie’ rod with a decent reel could probably boat a big fish. Plus if it’s ‘kayak specific’ you won’t be able to use it from the shore! LOL

Salem last year, the Barbie rod division was won by an upper 40s Striper

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