gellfex

Anyone use a "track saw" adapter system?

Rate this topic

22 posts in this topic

I've always just set up a sawhorse table and used a nice clean & straight 8' piece of 1x6 FJ as a cutting guide for ripping stuff on the job site. I have a table saw in my home shop that I use for jobs that can be prepped in advance, but don't want to shlep it around, especially to a 4th floor walkup!  So I'm looking at the various track systems for sale. I see the Kreg KMA3700 ACCU-Cut XL For $150, and the better reviewed True Trac 105TPC Universal Track Saw Guide for nearly twice that. I can't justify the fancier systems like Festool and such, and I have 2 circular saws already, one a classic and immortal 30 year old Milwaukee.

 

So, anyone have one of these systems or another, or any comments?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

Take about a foot off the edge of a piece of 1/4 luan, or better yet, tempered Masonite. Take a very straight 8 foot length of 1X3  screw it 2 or three inches from the edge from underneath with a lot of glue too.  Now run your Skilsaw along it using the 1X3 as a guide.

 

When you need to make a straight cut, use a couple of cheap C clamps to attach the jig to your stock, lining the edge up with your intended cut and slide the saw down it. I use a shorter version for bottom o' door cuts

 

Because the Masonite is so stable, this will stay straight as an arrow until you get sick of it

Edited by Stewie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Stewie That's not a hellava lot different from what I'm already doing, I was looking to up my game! Cutting up sheets is easy, the trickiest moves are what really should be done on the table saw, like taking 1/4" off a 1x3, except that sometimes that needs a taper. The jigging for that can get elaborate, requiring screwing the board down to my worktable since it's too small to clamp a guide to. Working on century+ old houses can get insane, everything needs to be trimmed or scribed into place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

2 hours ago, gellfex said:

@Stewie That's not a hellava lot different from what I'm already doing, I was looking to up my game! Cutting up sheets is easy, the trickiest moves are what really should be done on the table saw, like taking 1/4" off a 1x3, except that sometimes that needs a taper. The jigging for that can get elaborate, requiring screwing the board down to my worktable since it's too small to clamp a guide to. Working on century+ old houses can get insane, everything needs to be trimmed or scribed into place.

Trust me, Stewie knows what you are talking about , as do I.

I use 1/4" BC or AC plywood and 3/4"  MDO w/glue and 1/2" screws countersunk. 

I have three each 8' , 4' , 3' ( for doors ) , for the three different circ. saws I use, and have easily three times that many made for the three routers I use, with different bases, and bits.

It's a frickin pile of jigs that makes me money.

Edited by Ben Lippen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just looked at the Kreg that you mentioned, and it looks good. 

But the thing with them is, once you mount the saw, and use it... cut the edge strip... yer stuck with that. That sled has to live on that saw. If you take it off, you'll be buggered to get it back again where it once was. Accuracy and any splinter cover gone.

One thing I see about that one is that you could run left or right saws.. But only once or forever. 

That's why I like making my own to fit each tool. Waaaaay cheaper and set just as they need be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

17 mins ago, Ben Lippen said:

Trust me, Stewie knows what you are talking about , as do I.

I use 1/4" BC or AC plywood and 3/4"  MDO w/glue and 1/2" screws countersunk. 

I have three each 8' , 4' , 3' ( for doors ) , for the three different circ. saws I use, and have easily three times that many made for the three routers I use, with different bases.

It's a frickin pile of jigs that makes me money.

OK, so you're saying don't waste my money. But other than not getting marks from sliding the saw base on the wood being cut, admittedly important if it's already finished, what's the advantage of the jig over just clamping a straight 1x6 onto the work as I've been doing for both rips and door trimming?

 

EDIT, just read your 2nd post and the advantage is the splinter cover, right?

Edited by gellfex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

So Ben, if you had to rip 1/4" off a 1x3x80 using your jig, how would you hold it? Screw it to the jig plate? A cool thing about that extruded track is the blind clamping underneath.

Edited by gellfex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ya could screw it to the board. Either way, ya should just lay it on a bench and clamp down. 

I carry horses and a bench top.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

21 mins ago, gellfex said:

EDIT, just read your 2nd post and the advantage is the splinter cover, right?

Yeah. Yer married to any track jig that doesn't have it's own saw for $500.00 more.

You could make a set like mine for  under $200.00. 

Edited by Ben Lippen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

12 mins ago, Ben Lippen said:

Ya could screw it to the board. Either way, ya should just lay it on a bench and clamp down. 

I carry horses and a bench top.

 

I have horses and some old hollow slab doors I pulled from a set of bypass closets that I use for site worktables. They're light to carry up 3 flights! Most of the work like this revolves around doors and casings so the length works.

Edited by gellfex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 mins ago, gellfex said:

I have horses and some old hollow slab doors I pulled from a set of bypass closets that I use for site worktables. They're light to carry up 3 flights! Most of the work like this revolves around doors and casings.

That's all ya need. Well and a jig or two/three for what needs doin'.  Money well spent , rather than wasted on a tool that ya really dont need.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, that would be some money now freed up for another tool jones, the Makita 18ga Brad nailer. Being able to do little maintenance stuff without schlepping around the pancake compressor would be sweet! 

 

I'm really not much of a tool junkie compared to some people I know. I've just learned the hard way that sometimes having the exact right tool is a really worth it vs muddling through. One friend is all in for Festool. If he has clearance on his credit card, he is buying stuff! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ben, I use a grandfather Rockwell saw, the one with the huge baseplate and a Porter-Cable Sawboss(the little lefty) my long guide boards are cut with one side for each saw (handy for cutting siding to allow for wider window trim)

 

Although a pain the ..., I do taper cuts on a table saw and true up with a hand planer, But Gell is trying to avoid transporting  table saw up stairs et. c.

 

Unless we are talking stain grade work, it might make sense to attach a thin board to the jig with sheet rock screws, I can't think of an easy way to clamp it

 

Gell, look into the DeWalt table saw, the one that will only cut up to 16" wide. It is very easy to carry, and has the best fence ever on a portable saw, hooks up nicely to a shop vac with a 2 inch hose. Once in a while you can bag one for 200 with the stand at Homeys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My son has gone all battery powered nail guns. The framers are slow and heavy, but the finish guns he has are sweet. Perfect for punch list or small jobs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Stewie said:

My son has gone all battery powered nail guns. The framers are slow and heavy, but the finish guns he has are sweet. Perfect for punch list or small jobs

That's my impression, I maintain 13 apartments, so most of my work isn't major reno. My table saw isn't big, its the cult classic Ryobi BT3000 that's only 75 lb, but still more than I want to shlep. I'm a believer in getting light tools, I bought a little Ryobi 7.25 miter saw just for those little jobs, not to have to drag my 10" or 12" around. Sadly, it was badly made like too many Ryobi tools, the 2 sides of the one piece fence weren't parallel! I had to clamp the fence in my milling machine and face it. Then some scumbag stole it from the hallway where I was putting down toe molding. My current project is improving security in that building with a new exterior door and cell phone based video intercom.

 

Ryobi is strange, when their tools aren't flawed, they're truly great like the BT3000. One of my favorite and most used power tools is a tiny 4v drill/driver my wife accidentally got me because it came with the active noise reduction hearing protectors she got me as a gift. The muffs were lame, but the little 2 speed drill with a driving clutch I use all the time for small machine screws and the like. Saves the old wrists!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.