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Joeny718

Homemade sinkers

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Its very hard to find lead these days to make it worth pouring sinkers. The government put some lead law out there. I looked for awhile before i found some to make it cost efficient to pour and make them myself a friend worked at a scrap metal place and i scored a big load.  Clean lead is up to like 2.00 lb kinda crazy

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They mail pharmaceuticals.

They'll mail this to your house with no issues.

 

The toxic shed. :)

 

Lead ingots - You can check roto metals - 1 pound for $3.00

Let's say the tackle shop sells them .25c an ounce. 4 ounces = $1.00

4 lead at 4 ounces = 1 pound at $4.00 - You save A $1.00

 

amazon has 25 pounds at $77.00

100 lead at 4 ounces = 25 pound at $100.00 - You save $23.00

 

50 pounds factoring the shipping and labor time. Does it make cents? ;)

 

Edited by SandSpike1

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Have any friends who do plumbing? My buddy's a plumber and he gives me 100s of pounds a year.  Old lead bends etc.. 

Also dead car batteries have a fair bit in them, worth more in sinkers than the $5 you get at a junkyard..  Just take care when opening them up there's some acid in there that can be easily washed away once open....

 

Obviously these aren't "clean" lead sources but they work just fine for the thousands of sinkers and jig heads I've poured over the years.

 

I've never actually paid a dime for lead..

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Plumber's are a great source. Walk in showers built in the 50's and 60's used lead sheet to make a waterproof pan. At least 80lbs. Plus per shower. Also the waste lines in homes of that time period were lead.

Wheels weights can be used but, you gotta refine them down to get the steel clip and high slag content out.

Every x-ray room has a wall of lead bricks for the technician to stand behind. Each brick weights around 40lbs. Now, I have a bunch of these but. Me and buddy have yet to do anything with them cause we have yet to get a straight answer how toxic they could be.

For someone who doesn't work in construction. My recommendation would be to find a scrap yard and buy from them.

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Don't forget yard sales. I saw lead hammers at 2 different sales this weekend, about a half dozen of them total.

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Unless you are making some special design, not worth it in my book.

After buying/making mold and poring tools, how much would you save?

Not including burning and toxin risk.

 

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3 hours ago, Dan Tinman said:

Nobody is telling this guy about the hazards involved.

I'll bite! I pour lead as part of a business, just as Dan does. We had a big discussion on SOL awhile back about lead & the potential hazards, and misinformation about lead. A search should find it & many other discussions about pouring lead.

 

 

You folks in the NE, there have been some laws passed restricting the use of lead, but may not affect you if you only fish in the salt. Be sure before you venture into this. 

 

I'm in SC and have no problem finding lead. The more you buy the less you can get it for, but still may not save you much money compared to buying your sinkers. Wheel weight lead used to be easy to get cheap, and is fine for sinkers, but as has been said, government intervention has caused that lead has been mostly phased out for other less "toxic" metals. 

 

You can sometimes get used molds at reasonable prices, and you need some means to melt & pour the lead into the molds. It's an investment in the equipment that you need to make, so do the math before you decide. 

 

Also as Dan indicated, there's more to it than simply watching out for acid if you should want to recycle such lead sources as batteries. That acid is also explosive, and you still need to dispose of the rest of the battery and you most likely can't legally just dump in the trash can. 

 

For other lead sources, such as scrap, there's the potential for being exposed to a higher amount of the dust, lead oxide and that's one of the real potential hazards with handling lead. 

 

It's not generally a big concern if you use common sense with pouring lead, but it's also not something you may want to be doing in some types of houses or apartments. There is also the potential for fire & burn ( your flesh) hazards when pouring, so a lot to think about. 

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