ThrowinPlugs

Electric smoker: Water pan or No water pan?

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So, I've been using my smoker for about 2 years now on and off and have used the water pan every time. Everything always comes out delicious but I cant seem to ever get a good bark or maillard reaction going. It always kinda starts drying up but the rub still stays pretty wet. Would removing the water pan help with this? Any negative effects by removing it?

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Eff all Yalllss. It works. And it works well. i never had any complaints from any of you yams.

And i never will cause youz aint gettin any more any how!   EVER!

Not even Tom is gonna burst my bubble this week!

AAAHAHAHAHAHAAAHH!!!!

 

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I use a Masterbuilt electric smoker from Homies, never had any complaints. The idea of being able to get the temperature correct and not have to worry about it dropping to low is great. My days and nights of staying up to monitor the temp on my smoker are over. Getting to know how your smoker works takes some time, mine cooks fast so I need to keep the temp lower then most, don't ever use water in my smoker but I will spray the meat with a mix of juice and water or broth.

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The first rule of Smoking meat-Low and slow. The water pan does NOT add moisture to the cooking meat, it catches the drippings so that they don't reach to fire and flare up. If you think the water adds moisture do a simple test, boil a fillet mignon in a pot of water at the same time you take a chuck roast and cook it in the oven at 220F. Almost the same temp, one completely surrounded by water (if any is gonna seep in it will. compare results.

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1 min ago, BobT said:

The first rule of Smoking meat-Low and slow. The water pan does NOT add moisture to the cooking meat, it catches the drippings so that they don't reach to fire and flare up. If you think the water adds moisture do a simple test, boil a fillet mignon in a pot of water at the same time you take a chuck roast and cook it in the oven at 220F. Almost the same temp, one completely surrounded by water (if any is gonna seep in it will. compare results.

Plenty of these idiots in here boiling filet and crock potting pork chops.  It's a travesty.  

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Browning, or the Maillard reaction, creates flavor and changes the color of food. Maillard reactions generally only begin to occur above 285°F (140°C). Until the Maillard reaction occurs meat will have less flavor.

 

I will cook ribs and shoulders at about 225-250. I use apple or peach smoke wood, No smoke wood added after 2 hours. I wrap in foil: ribs get another hour, shoulders get another 10 hours (overnight). both get dry rub. Ribs can be unwrapped and finished over an open flame charcoal grill. NVER USE LIGHTER FLUID, get an electric starter. You can learn a lot on the Weber smoker forums, recipes, shortcuts how to videos.

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16 mins ago, PCstriper said:

I use a Masterbuilt electric smoker from Homies, never had any complaints. The idea of being able to get the temperature correct and not have to worry about it dropping to low is great. My days and nights of staying up to monitor the temp on my smoker are over. Getting to know how your smoker works takes some time, mine cooks fast so I need to keep the temp lower then most, don't ever use water in my smoker but I will spray the meat with a mix of juice and water or broth.

This. Plus using their indirect "cold smoke generator" makes it awesome, separate control of smoke and heat.  I hated that little chip pan. I've never put water in the pan except for the few times I've done small 2lb pieces of chuck. Anything I can do to keep it from drying out. Most of the time the electric keeping things moist by not having the convection of a wood fire is an advantage, there's less air moving through.  I don't do pork shoulder or big hunks of brisket so I can't speak to the bark on that, but at 250 for 4 hrs skinless chicken parts or a whole chicken with dry rub have a nice dry "skin" to them. 

 

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Bluefish

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Chuck london broil

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